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Encyclopedia > Farnese Hercules
The Farnese Hercules, engraved by Hendrick Goltzius, 1591. Two onlookers give scale.
The Farnese Hercules, engraved by Hendrick Goltzius, 1591. Two onlookers give scale.

The Farnese Hercules is an ancient sculpture, probably an enlarged copy made in the early third century CE by Glykon[1] of an original of Lysippos or one of his circle, of the fourth century BCE.[2], made for the Baths of Caracalla in Rome (dedicated in 216 CE), where it was recovered in 1546[3]. Download high resolution version (450x625, 100 KB)Hendrick Goltzius 1558 - 1617, Farnese Hercules engraving published 1617 (dated) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus... Download high resolution version (450x625, 100 KB)Hendrick Goltzius 1558 - 1617, Farnese Hercules engraving published 1617 (dated) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus... Hendrik Goltzius (1558 - January 1, 1617), Dutch painter and engraver, was born at Millebrecht, in the duchy of Julich. ... Roman copy of Eros Stringing the Bow from the Capitoline Museum. ... The Baths of Caracalla, in 2003 The Baths of Caracalla were Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between 212 and 216 AD, during the reign of the Emperor Caracalla. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban...


It stood for generations in its own room at Palazzo Farnese, Rome, where the hero was surrounded by frescoed depictions of his feats by Federico Zuccari, executed in 1566-1569 (as Vasari noted). The Farnese statue was moved to Naples in 1787 and is now displayed in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale. A mid-18th century engraving of Palazzo Farnese by Giuseppe Vasi Palazzo Farnese, Rome (housing the French Embassy), is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century (Sir Banister Fletcher) (1). ... Federigo Zuccaro, Self-portrait, after 1588 Federigo Zuccaro or Federico Zuccari (c. ... Giorgio Vasaris selfportrait Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari (Arezzo, Tuscany July 3, 1511 - Florence, June 27, 1574) was an Italian painter and architect, mainly known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. ... The Museo Archeologico Nazionale Napoli (National Archaeological Museum) is located in Naples, Italy. ...


The type was well known in Antiquity: a Hellenistic or Roman bronze reduction, found at Foligno is conserved in the Musée du Louvre; a small marble, probably Greek of the Roman period, is to be seen in the Museum of the Ancient Agora, Athens ( illustration). Foligno, (Latin: Fulginiae, Fulginium) an ancient town of Italy, in the province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 233 meters (764 ft) above sea-level, on the Topino river where it leaves the Apennines and enters the wide plain of the Clitunno river system. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 326 × 598 pixel Image in higher resolution (900 × 1652 pixel, file size: 260 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Statuette en marbre de lHéraclès du type dit «Farnèse». Musée de lAgora antique dAthènes. ...


Hercules is one of the most famous sculptures of antiquity, and has fixed the image of the mythic hero in the European imagination. It quickly made its way into the collection of Alessandro Farnese, nephew of Pope Paul III. Alessandro Farnese was well placed to form one of the greatest collections of classical sculpture that has been assembled since Antiquity. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Heracles. ... Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma and Piacenza (1545 - 1592) was the son of Duke Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma and Margaret, the illegitimate daughter of the Habsburg Emperor Charles V. Thus Alessandro was the nephew of Philip II of Spain and of Don John of Austria. ... Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope from 1534 to 1549. ...


The Farnese Hercules is a massive and muscular marble statue, following a lost original cast in bronze through a method called lost wax casting. It depicts a weary Hercules leaning on his club, which has his lion-skin draped over it. He is performing one of the last of The Twelve Labours, which is suggested by the apples of the Hesperides he holds behind his back. This prominently-sited statue was well-liked by the Romans, and copies have been found in Roman palaces and gymnasiums: another, coarser, stood in the courtyard of Palazzo Farnese; one with the feigned ( but probably ancient) inscription "Lykippos" has stood in the court of Palazzo Pitti, Florence, since the sixteenth century. Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... This article is about the manufacturing process. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Heracles. ... Hercules and the Hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours (Greek: dodekathlos) of Heracles (Latin: Hercules) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Early, tinted 20th-century photograph of the Palazzo Pitti, then still known as La Residenza Reale following the residency of King Emmanuel II between 1865–71, when Florence was the capital of Italy. ...

Hellenistic or Roman bronze reduction, found at Foligno (Musée du Louvre).
Hellenistic or Roman bronze reduction, found at Foligno (Musée du Louvre).

The sculpture has been reassembled and restored by degrees. According to a letter of Guglielmo della Porta, the head had been recovered separately, from a well in Trastevere, and was bought for Farnese through the agency of della Porta, whose legs made to complete the figure were so well regarded that when the original legs were recovered from ongoing excavations in the Baths of Caracalla, della Porta's were retained, on Michelangelo's advice, in part to demonstrate that modern sculptors could bear direct comparison with the ancients. The original legs, from the Borghese collection, were not reunited with the sculpture until 1787.[4] Goethe, in his Italian Journey, recounts his differing impressions upon seeing the Hercules with each set of legs, marvelling at the clear superiority of the original ones. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 300 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1445 × 2890 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 300 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1445 × 2890 pixel, file size: 2. ... Foligno, (Latin: Fulginiae, Fulginium) an ancient town of Italy, in the province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 233 meters (764 ft) above sea-level, on the Topino river where it leaves the Apennines and enters the wide plain of the Clitunno river system. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Guglielmo della Porta (ca 1500 — 1577) was an Italian architect and sculptor, a member of a North Italian dynasty of masons, sculptors and architects. ... Logo of the rione A typical narrow alley in Trastevere seen from the lower slopes of the Gianicolo hill Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere at night Trastevere is rione XIII of Rome, on the west bank of the Tiber, south of Vatican City. ... Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475 – February 18, 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, poet and engineer. ... Borghese is the surname of a family of Italian noble and papal background, originating in Siena where they came to prominence in the 13th century holding official offices under the commune. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ...


Hercules is caught in a rare moment of repose. Leaning on his knobby club which is draped with the pelt of the Nemean Lion, he holds the apples of the Hesperides in his right hand, but conceals them behind his back like a pitcher with a knuckleball. Many engravings and woodcuts spread the fame of the Farnese's Hercules. By 1562 the find was already included in the set of engravings for Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae ("Mirror of Rome's Magnificence")[1] and connoisseurs, artists and tourists gaped at the original, which stood in the courtyard of the Palazzo Farnese, protected under the arcade. In 1590-91, during his trip to Rome, Hendrik Goltzius sketched the statue in the palazzo courtyard. Later (in 1591) Goltzius recorded the less common rear view, in a bravura engraving (illustration, right), which emphasizes the already exaggerated muscular form with swelling and tapering lines that flow over the contours.[2] The young Rubens made quick sketches of the Hercules' planes and massing. Before photography, prints were the only way to put the image into many hands. The Nemean Lion (Latin: Leon Nemeus) was a vicious monster in Greek mythology that lived in Nemea. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... A self portrait Hendrik Goltzius (1558 - January 1, 1617), Dutch painter and engraver, was born at Millebrecht, in the duchy of Julich. ... Rubens and Isabella Brant in the Honeysuckle Bower Alte Pinakothek Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was the most popular and prolific Flemish and European painter of the 17th century. ...


The sculpture was admired from the start, reservations about its exaggerated musculature only surfacing in the later eighteenth century.[5]. Napoleon remarked to Antonio Canova that its lack in the museum he accumulated in Paris was the most important gap in the collection, and the sculpture was more than once crated ready for shipment to Paris before the Napoleonic regime fled Naples. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Self-portrait by Canova, 1792. ...


Wealthy collectors could afford one of the numerous bronze replicas in sizes for table-top display. A full-size marble copy that belonged to the Bourbons of Naples is at the National Museum, Naples. Copies of the Farnese Hercules appeared in 17th and 18th century gardens throughout Europe. At Wilhelmshöhe, near Kassel, a colossal version 8.5 m high produced by Johann Jacob Anthoni, 1713-1717, has become the city's mascot. André Le Nôtre placed a full-size gilded version against the skyline at the far end of the main vista at Vaux-le-Vicomte. That at Palace of Versailles is a copy by Jean Cornu, 1684-86. In Scotland, a rare copy in lead, of the first half of the 18th century, overlooks the recently restored Hercules Garden at Blair Castle. A palace near Cassel. ... Kassel (until 1926 officially Cassel) is a city situated along the Fulda River in northern Hessen, Germany, one of the two sources of the Weser river . ... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of King Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... Vaux-le-vicomte was in many ways the most important work built before Louis XIV came to power. ... Hall of Mirrors redirects here. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Blair Castle Blair Castle is a castle in the village of Blair Atholl on Tayside in Scotland. ...


Notes

  1. ^ The sculpture bears the incised signature of Glykon, in Greek. Glykon, whether working in Rome or Athens, is not otherwise known.
  2. ^ Bieber 1961; Robertson 1975.
  3. ^ The chronicler Ulisse Aldrovandi, 1556.
  4. ^ Haskell and Penny 1981 p. 229.
  5. ^ Haskell and Penny.

Ulisse Aldrovandi Ulisse Aldrovandi (11 September 1522 - 10 November 1605) was an Italian naturalist, the moving force behind Bolognas botanical garden, one of the first in Europe. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Hercules Farnese

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ...

References

  • Margarete Bieber, The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age, rev. ed. (New York) 1961.
  • Phyllis Bober and Ruth Rubinstein. Renaissance Artists and Antique Sculpture, 1986.
  • Francis Haskell and Nicholas Penny, Taste and the Antique (New Haven:Yale University Press), 1981. Catalogue no. 46, pp 229-32.
  • Martin Robertson, A History of Greek Art (Cambridge) 1975.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Palazzo Farnese, Rome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (546 words)
Construction began in 1517(1), commissioned by Alessandro Farnese, who had been appointed as a Cardinal in 1493 at age 25 (thanks to his sister, who was Pope Alexander VI Borgia's official mistress) and was living a princely lifestyle.
The Palazzo was inherited from the Farnese by the Bourbon kings of Naples, from whom the French government purchased it in 1874.
Satellite photo- The Palazzo Farnese is the massive, almost square, court-yarded structure in the center of the photo, to the North of the Tiber.
Farnese Atlas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (426 words)
The Farnese Atlas at the Museo Archaeologico Nazionale in Naples, Italy.
The Farnese Atlas is a 2nd-century Roman marble copy of a Hellenistic sculpture of Atlas kneeling with a globe weighing heavily on his shoulders.
The name Farnese Atlas reflects its acquisition by Alessandro Cardinal Farnese in the early 16th century, and its subsequent exhibition in the Villa Farnese.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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