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Encyclopedia > Faramir
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Faramir
Titles
See Names and titles below
Race Men
Culture Dúnedain, House of Húrin
Date of birth T.A. 2983
Date of death F.A. 82
Realm Gondor
Book(s) The Two Towers
The Return of the King

In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, Faramir is a fictional character appearing in The Lord of the Rings. He is first mentioned in The Fellowship of the Ring and appears later in The Two Towers and The Return of the King. In The Fellowship of the Ring Faramir is introduced to the story as the younger brother of Boromir and second son of Denethor II, the Steward of Gondor. The relationships between the three men are revealed over the course of The Two Towers and The Return of the King. This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990-?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but best friends. ... Ondoher is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... This article is about the son of Denethor. ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were a fictional race of Men descended from the Númenóreans that survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. ... In the literary works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Húrin was founded by Húrin of Emyn Arnen, Steward to King Minardil, the twenty-fifth King of Gondor. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... For the city in Ethiopia, see Gondar. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... This article is about the book. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... This article is about the novel. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the son of Denethor II. For the son of Denethor I, see Boromir (Steward). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Denethor II is the twenty-sixth and last Ruling Steward of Gondor. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ...


Faramir's character interacts with many of the major characters in Tolkien's story, and shares dialogue with several of them. He first appears in person in The Two Towers, when meeting Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee in Ithilien. Like Boromir, Faramir is presented with a choice when he discovers that Frodo carries the One Ring. Frodo redirects here. ... Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Appearances

Literature

Faramir is the brother of Boromir and the second child of Denethor II and Finduilas, daughter of Adrahil of Dol Amroth. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Finduilas was the sister of Prince Imrahil of Dol Amroth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Dol Amroth is a fictional place being a princedom which forms part of the kingdom of Gondor. ...


When Faramir was five years old, his mother died. After her death, his father, Denethor, became sombre, cold, and detached from his family. However, the relationship between Faramir and Boromir, who was five years Faramir's elder, only grew closer. Denethor openly favoured Boromir over Faramir, but there was no jealousy or rivalry between the two. Boromir protected Faramir, and Faramir looked up to his older brother.[1]


Tolkien writes that it was Faramir's "love of lore and music"[1] that led him to form a friendship with Gandalf, called "Mithrandir" by the people of Gondor. He learned what he could from Mithrandir's wisdom and mentoring. Denethor did not approve of Faramir becoming the “wizard’s pupil”, for he neither trusted nor liked the Istari (as wizards of Gandalf's order were called).[1] For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ...


Faramir’s leadership, skill-in-arms, and swift but hardy judgement[2] proved invaluable in battle, and earned him Gondor's respect. During the War of the Ring, he was the Captain of the Rangers of Ithilien, which consisted of the Dúnedain of the South belonging to the line of the Lords of Westernesse. Faramir defended Gondor from Sauron on many fronts, but did not enjoy fighting for its own sake.[3] Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of Ithilien, also known as the Rangers of the South and Rangers of Gondor, were an elite group of the Southern Dúnedain warriors who scouted in and guarded Ithilien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were a fictional race of Men descended from the Númenóreans that survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... This article is about a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ...


Early in The Fellowship of the Ring, Faramir had a prophetic dream of a voice speaking the following riddle:

Seek for the Sword that was broken:
In Imladris it dwells;
There shall be counsels taken
Stronger than Morgul-spells.
There shall be shown a token
That Doom is near at hand,
For Isildur's Bane shall waken,
And the Halfling forth shall stand.[4] Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... It has been suggested that BitKinex WebDAV Client be merged into this article or section. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ...

Anke Eißmann's portrayal of Faramir interrogating Frodo.
Anke Eißmann's portrayal of Faramir interrogating Frodo.

The dream came to Faramir twice more and to Boromir once. The brothers told their dream to their father, who told them only that Imladris was the Elvish name for Rivendell, home of Elrond the Half-elven. Although Faramir wanted to go for the sake of Gondor, Boromir, with Denethor's support, claimed the right to the mission. Image File history File links FaramirTrial. ... Image File history File links FaramirTrial. ... Anke Katrin Eißmann (b. ... Frodo redirects here. ... Elvish languages are constructed languages used typically by elves in a fantasy setting. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Half-elven (Sindarin singular Peredhel, plural Peredhil), are the children of the union of Elves and Men. ...


One night, while on guard, Faramir waded down to the Anduin river after seeing a boat there. It contained the dead body of his brother, who had been killed by Orcs. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ...


Faramir first encountered the Hobbits Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee in Ithilien and recognized them to be the Halflings mentioned in his dreams. Faramir questioned Frodo of his quest, and Frodo revealed that he, along with eight other companions, had set out from Rivendell. During the interrogation, Faramir asked often about Boromir. Faramir also asked about the One Ring, but Frodo tried to avoid the subject. Faramir determined that Frodo was carrying one of Sauron's great weapons. At this point, he showed the crucial difference between him and his proud brother: This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ...

But fear no more! I would not take this thing, if it lay by the highway. Not were Minas Tirith falling in ruin and I alone could save her, so, using the weapon of the Dark Lord for her good and my glory. No, I do not wish for such triumphs, Frodo son of Drogo.[3]

In the Rangers’ secret refuge behind the waterfall, Henneth Annûn, Sam accidentally spoke of Boromir’s desire for the One Ring, thus revealing the item Frodo was carrying. Despite the Hobbits’ fears, Faramir was wise enough to realize that such a weapon was not to be used and if desired, should be resisted. With this knowledge, he also realized what his brother had to face, and wished that he had gone on the quest himself — knowing that Boromir would not have been able to resist the temptation to seize the Ring for himself. Giving them provisions, he sent them on their way to continue their quest, but warned Frodo that their guide, Gollum, was a treacherous creature, and that an unknown terror lived in Cirith Ungol. Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Baggins family is a remarkable and rich Hobbit family. ... In JRR Tolkiens Lord of the Rings trilogy, Henneth Annûn was a hidden Gondorian outpost in North Ithilien. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ...


The following evening in Cair Andros, Faramir sent his company south to reinforce the garrison at Osgiliath, while he and three of his men rode to Minas Tirith. Along the way, they were pursued by Sauron's servants, the Nazgûl. Faramir rode back to help the fallen. Immediately, Gandalf rode out to their aid, temporarily banishing the Nazgûl. In The Lord of the Rings, Cair Andros is an island in the middle of the Anduin River. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ...

Anke Eißmann's portrayal of Faramir reporting to his father, Denethor, and Gandalf; with Pippin at the rear.

In The Return of the King, Faramir arrived at Minas Tirith and reported to Denethor and Gandalf of his encounter with Frodo and Sam. Denethor became angry that Faramir had not brought the Ring to Gondor, wishing that he and his brother’s places had been reversed — since Denethor believed that Boromir would have brought Sauron's weapon to him. Denethor sent Faramir to hold Osgiliath against Sauron's armies, which greatly outnumbered their own. Although Faramir disagreed with his father’s strategy, he agreed to go. Image File history File links FaramirReport. ... Image File history File links FaramirReport. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–F.A. 70), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... This article is about the book. ...


Sauron's second-in-command, the Witch-king of Angmar, led a much larger force from Minas Morgul, and attacked Osgiliath. After Osgiliath was conquered, Faramir decided to stay with the rearguard in order to make sure that the retreat over Pelennor would not turn into a rout. He was gravely wounded by a Southron arrow shot by one of the Nazgûl. Fortunately, all of the mounted soldiers in the city rode to his aid and brought him back to Denethor in Minas Tirith. The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Minas Morgul (Sindarin for Tower of Black Magic), also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil (Tower of the Moon), is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ... Combatants Gondor, Rohan Mordor, Harad, Rhûn Commanders Denethor†, Gandalf, Imrahil, Théoden†, Aragorn, Éomer The Witch-king of Angmar†, Gothmog† Strength In Minas Tirith: Minas Tirith Garrison and Northern Army of Gondor (strength unknown) supported by small southern contingent (<3000). ...


When Faramir was returned, Denethor believed him to be dead. That blow, coupled with a vision in the prophetic palantír of the forces arrayed against him, caused him to lose his mind. He ordered his servants to build a funeral pyre in the House of Stewards for him and his son. A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ...

Anke Eißmann's portrayal of Faramir and Éowyn standing on the walls of the City of Minas Tirith.

Denethor's temporary Hobbit servant, Peregrin Took, went to alert Gandalf and Beregond, one of the Tower Guards he had befriended. Gandalf and Beregond stopped the impending sacrifice just in time. Mad with grief, Denethor jumped onto the lit pyre, burning himself alive. Image File history File links FaramirMantle. ... Image File history File links FaramirMantle. ... Éowyn (T.A. 2995–F.A. ?), a shieldmaiden of Rohan, is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth who appears in his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–F.A. 70), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... For the Lord of the Rings character with this name, see Beregond (Captain). ...


Two days later, the battle over, Aragorn came and revived Faramir with athelas in the Houses of Healing. Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Athelas is a fictional healing herb from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, also known as Kingsfoil or Asëa Aranion. ... Éowyn in the Houses of Healing In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Houses of Healing were the houses that lay in the sixth circle of Minas Tirith, surrounded by lawns and trees, where the healers of Gondor did their work. ...


Faramir met the Lady Éowyn of Rohan; moved by her sorrow, pride, and beauty, he eventually fell in love with her. At first Éowyn refused his advances, only desiring to go to war to find honour in death. But soon Éowyn realized that she had come to love him in return. For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ...


Faramir briefly served as a Ruling Steward, and began preparing the city for the arrival of Aragorn, who was now King of Gondor. On the day of the King’s official coronation, Faramir surrendered his office. Aragorn, however, announced that as long as his line would last, Faramir and his descendants would be Stewards of Gondor.


Aragorn appointed Faramir as the Prince of Ithilien and Beregond to be the Captain of his guard, the White Company. As Prince of Ithilien, he and the Prince of Dol Amroth became King Elessar's chief commanders. His duties also included acting as resident march-warden of Gondor's main eastward outpost, rehabilitating the lost territories, as well as clearing it of outlaws and Orcs and cleansing Minas Morgul of evil remnants.[5] Faramir also fulfilled the traditional role as Steward, acting as the King’s chief counsellor and ruling Gondor in his absence. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ...


With Éowyn, he settled in Emyn Arnen, where the two had a son named Elboron. After Faramir’s death at the age of 120, his son succeeded him in all of his titles. Barahir, Faramir's grandson, wrote The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen, which was inserted (in an abbreviated form) in the Thain's Book by the writer Findegil, and appears in The Lord of the Rings as part of Appendix A.[6] Barahir may have been the son of Elboron, but nothing directly indicates this conclusion. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Emyn Arnen is a series of hills in Ithilien, Gondor. ... Fictional book in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Adaptations

David Wenham as Faramir in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movie trilogy
David Wenham as Faramir in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

In the BBC's 1981 radio adaptation of The Lord of the Rings, Faramir is voiced by Andrew Seear. Image File history File links Faramir_ride. ... Image File history File links Faramir_ride. ... David Wenham (born 21 September 1965) is an Australian actor who has appeared in movies, television series and theatre productions. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ...


In the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy directed by Peter Jackson, Faramir is played by David Wenham. Wenham jokes that he got the role because he and Sean Bean, who played Boromir, both had large noses.[7] A minor change is that in the book, Faramir and his brother are dark-haired and, following a statement in Unfinished Tales, lack beards, but in the movie, they have fair hair and are slightly bearded. This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... David Wenham (born 21 September 1965) is an Australian actor who has appeared in movies, television series and theatre productions. ... Shaun Mark Bean (born 17 April 1959) is an English film and stage actor. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ...


In the Jackson films, Faramir does not at first let Frodo, Sam, and Gollum go, but decides to bring them and the Ring to Gondor. He takes them west to Osgiliath and not until the Nazgûl attack the city does he release them. This change received some criticism; some fans have jokingly dubbed him "Filmamir" or "Farfromthebookamir", among other names.[8]


Jackson's explanation is that he needed another adventure to delay Frodo and Sam, because the episode at Cirith Ungol was moved to the third movie, and so a new climax was needed. In fact, according to the timeline given by Tolkien, Frodo and Sam had only reached the Morannon at the time of the fall of Isengard. Jackson also argues that it was necessary for Faramir to be tempted by the Ring because in his films everyone else was tempted, and letting Faramir be immune would be inconsistent in the eyes of a film audience.[9] Co-screenwriter Philippa Boyens and actor David Wenham defended the changes to Faramir's character in order to increase dramatic tension: Faramir's "sea-green incorruptible" nature in the book would not have "[translated] well filmically".[10] Wenham also found Tolkien's original "dramatically dead", despite having not read the book.[11] The climax (or turning point) of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the solution is given. ... The Black Gate or Morannon is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ...


Several fans, however, remain unimpressed and unconvinced by the cast and crew's justifications;[12][13] for these, Faramir was rendered too much like Boromir and thus the contrast between the two was severely weakened.[13]


Some have also criticized the Rangers' treatment of Gollum, who is beaten up, and Faramir's implicit compliance.[14][15] In the book, Faramir calls the creature Sméagol instead of Gollum, and told his men to "treat him gently...but watch him."[3]


In the extended edition of The Two Towers, Jackson included an invented flashback scene showing that Denethor had neglected him in favour of Boromir, so that Faramir wanted to please his father by bringing him the Ring. (The relationship is similarly strained in the book, but his father's favouritism does not seem to affect his decisions in Ithilien.) Overall the added scene in the extended edition present Faramir in a far more favourable light.


Faramir is a bonus playable character in the video game The Return of the King. In a bonus video track within this game, Wenham said that "Faramir and Boromir were brothers, and it isn't beyond possibility that Faramir would have gone to Rivendell instead. And if that happened, Faramir would have survived and returned to Gondor."


Names and titles

Faramir's name is of unstated origin. The final syllable is likely the same as in his brother Boromir's name,[16] which was described by Tolkien as of mixed form[17] and possibly combines Sindarin bor(on)- 'steadfast' with either Sindarin mîr or Quenya míre 'jewel'.[18] The first part of Faramir's name can be consistent with Elvish roots meaning 'suffice' and 'hunt'.[19] However, it is also stated that the Stewards of Gondor often bore names "remembered in the songs and histories of the First Age",[17] without paying special attention to meaning. Thus Boromir's name was also born by Boromir of the House of Bëor in the First Age, and the younger son of King Ondoher of Gondor was similarly called Faramir, though in the latter case the name was in Quenya.[20] Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Quenya is one of the fictional languages spoken by the Elves (the Quendi) the ones who speak. The first-found children of Ilúvatar, in the fantasy works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Bëor was the oldest of the Three Houses of Men that had allied with the Elves in the First Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Bëor was the oldest of the Three Houses of Men that had allied with the Elves in the First Age. ... Ondoher is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


Faramir was the Captain of the Rangers of Ithilien (as well as the Captain of the White Tower after his brother's death) during the War of the Ring. After his father's death, Faramir also became the Steward of Gondor. When Aragorn was crowned King Elessar, Faramir laid down his office as Ruling Steward, but Elessar renewed his hereditary appointment as Steward and advisor to the King. Faramir was also appointed Prince of Ithilien and Lord of Emyn Arnen.


Concept and creation

Faramir's appearance toward the end of The Two Towers apparently was as much of a surprise to Tolkien as it is to his readers. "I am sure I did not invent him," he wrote. "I did not even want him, though I like him."[21]


Originally, Tolkien employed the use of thou and thee in The Lord of the Rings to show a "deliberate change to a form of affection or endearment."[22] His son presented the original drafts in which such usage was employed for one chapter, "The Steward and the King":

The 'sudden change' in which he referred here...is possibly to be seen in their first meeting in the garden of the Houses of Healing, where Faramir says (RK pg. 238): 'Then, Éowyn of Rohan, I say to you that you are beautiful', but at the end of his speech changes to the 'familiar' form, 'But thou and I have both passed under the wings of the Shadow' (whereas Éowyn continues to use 'you'). In the following meetings, in this text, Faramir uses the 'familiar' forms, but Éowyn does not do so until the last ('Dost thou not know?', RK p. 242); and soon after this point my father went back over what he had written and changed every 'thou' and 'thee' to 'you'.[22]

Long after completing The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien would write, "As far as any character is 'like me', it is Faramir."[23]. Faramir's relationship toward war in Tolkien's story reflected that of Tolkien himself, who was a soldier in World War I and fought in the Battle of the Somme. Tolkien bestowed his dream of "darkness unescapable" upon Faramir's character, who relates it to Éowyn in the fifth chapter of The Return of the King. Of this, Tolkien wrote, "For when Faramir speaks of his private vision of the Great Wave, he speaks for me. That vision and dream has been ever with me — and has been inherited (as I only discovered recently) by one of my children, Michael."[23] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants British Empire Australia Canada New Zealand Newfoundland South Africa United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Joseph Joffre Max von Gallwitz Fritz von Below Strength 13 British & 11 French divisions (initial) 51 British and 48 French divisions (final) 10. ...


See also

In the literary works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Húrin was founded by Húrin of Emyn Arnen, Steward to King Minardil, the twenty-fifth King of Gondor. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of Ithilien, also known as the Rangers of the South and Rangers of Gondor, were an elite group of the Southern Dúnedain warriors who scouted in and guarded Ithilien. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c J. R. R. Tolkien (April 1, 1987), The Return of the King, vol. 3, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. Appendix A, ISBN 0-395-08256-0
  2. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (April 1, 1987), The Return of the King, vol. 3, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. "Minas Tirith", ISBN 0-395-08256-0
  3. ^ a b c J. R. R. Tolkien (April 1, 1987), The Two Towers, vol. 2, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. "The Window on the West", ISBN 0-395-08254-4
  4. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (April 1, 1987), The Fellowship of the Ring, vol. 1, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. "The Council of Elrond", ISBN 0-395-08254-4
  5. ^ Carpenter, Humphrey, ed. (1981), The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. #323, ISBN 0-395-31555-7
  6. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (April 1, 1987), The Return of the King, vol. 3, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. Appendix A, ISBN 0-395-08256-0
  7. ^ Cameras in Middle-earth: Filming The Two Towers SEE DVD Documentary
  8. ^ The Reading Room. Caption Contest 33!!!!!!!!!!!! - Filmamir! er... Farfromthebookamir! No wait... it's Faramir!. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  9. ^ The Next Reel. GreenCine. Retrieved on 2006-08-16.
  10. ^ Understanding. There He Came. Shandy. Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  11. ^ The Lord of the Rings film trilogy - From Book to Script: Finding the Story [DVD]. New Line.
  12. ^ Eskew, Phil (2004-12-28). The Two Towers. The Nit Picker's Guide to the Lord of the Rings. Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  13. ^ a b Bitterness. There He Came. Shandy. Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  14. ^ The Nature of Faramir: A Response. Archives. TheOneRing.net (2002-12-24). Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  15. ^ The Faramir Changes: Arguments Against. Archives. TheOneRing.net (2003-02-12). Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  16. ^ Hammond, Wayne & Scull, Christina (2005), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, London: HarperCollins, pp. Note for page 657, ISBN 0-00-720907-X
  17. ^ a b J. R. R. Tolkien (April 1, 1987), The Return of the King, vol. 3, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. Appendix F, 'Of Men' Note 1, ISBN 0-395-08256-0
  18. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987), Christopher Tolkien, ed., The Lost Road and Other Writings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. The Etymologies, entries for 'BOR-' and 'MIR-', ISBN 0-395-45519-7
  19. ^ The Etymologies, entries for 'PHAR-' and 'SPAR-'.
  20. ^ Both the Kings of Gondor and their direct descendants bore Quenya names, for example Ondohir's elder son, Artamir.
  21. ^ Carpenter, Humphrey, ed. (1981), The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. #66, ISBN 0-395-31555-7
  22. ^ a b J. R. R. Tolkien (1996), Christopher Tolkien, ed., The Peoples of Middle-earth, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 68, ISBN 0-395-82760-4
  23. ^ a b Carpenter, Humphrey, ed. (1981), The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. #180, ISBN 0-395-31555-7

Tolkien redirects here. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by Tolkiens biographer Humphrey Carpenter assisted by Christopher Tolkien. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Wayne G. Hammond is a scholar known for his research and writings on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Christina Scull is a researcher and writer best known for her books about the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... ... The Lost Road and Other Writings is the fifth volume of The History of Middle-earth, a series of compilations of drafts and essays written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by Tolkiens biographer Humphrey Carpenter assisted by Christopher Tolkien. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The Peoples of Middle-earth is the 12th and final volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien from the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by Tolkiens biographer Humphrey Carpenter assisted by Christopher Tolkien. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
Denethor II
Stewards of Gondor Succeeded by
Elboron, then Barahir and the descendants

  Results from FactBites:
 
Faramir (3016 words)
Faramir knew that his life would be forfeit if he chose a course that did harm to Gondor, and yet he judged rightly that the Hobbits must be allowed to continue on their quest.
Faramir's affliction was the result of weariness and grief at his father's behavior and most of all from his close contact with the Black Breath of the Nazgul, who had pursued him twice in the past week.
Faramir died in the year 82 of the Fourth Age and Elboron succeeded him as the Steward of Gondor and the second Prince of Ithilien.
Faramir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2577 words)
Faramir, Steward of Gondor, Prince of Ithilien and Lord of Emyn Arnen (T.A. 82) was a wise man of nobility and the second of Denethor's two sons in J.
Faramir was born in the year 2983 of the Third Age to Denethor II and Finduilas, daughter of Adrahil of Dol Amroth.
Faramir in many ways speaks for Tolkien, who was a soldier in World War I and saw action in the Somme, when he spoke that he only fought to defend Gondor, not for glory or triumph or valour.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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