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Encyclopedia > Fantastic Four
Fantastic Four

Promotional art for Fantastic Four #509 (March 2004)
by Mike Wieringo.
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby
In story information
Base(s) of operation Baxter Building
Roster Mister Fantastic
Invisible Woman
Human Torch
Thing
See:List of Fantastic Four members
This box: view  talk  edit

The Fantastic Four is a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The group debuted in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961), which helped to usher in a new naturalism in the medium. They were the first superhero team created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist and co-plotter Jack Kirby. Fantastic Four is the name of: Fantastic Four, a superhero comic book from Marvel Comics, and the team appearing in it Fantastic Four (film), a 2005 film based on the Marvel Comics series directed by Tim Story Fantastic 4: The Album, the soundtrack of the 2005 film. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #509. ... Michael Lance Mike Wieringo (June 24, 1963–August 12, 2007)[1] was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics The Flash and Marvel Comics Fantastic Four. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... The Baxter Building is a fictitious Manhattan 35-story office building whose five upper floors house the Fantastic Fours headquarters in the Marvel Universe. ... Mr. ... “Invisible Girl” redirects here. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... The Fantastic Four (q. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity whose existence originates from a work of fiction. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Naturalism is a movement in theater, film, and literature that seeks to replicate a believable everyday reality, as opposed to such movements as Romanticism or Surrealism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


There are four core individuals traditionally associated with the Fantastic Four, who gained superpowers after exposure to cosmic rays during a scientific mission to outer space. Mr. Fantastic (Reed Richards) is a scientific genius and the leader of the group who can stretch his body into incredible lengths and shapes. The Invisible Woman (Susan "Sue" Storm) is Reed's wife; she can render herself invisible and project powerful force fields. The Human Torch (Johnny Storm) is Sue's younger brother, who can generate flames, surround himself with them and fly. The final member is the monstrous Thing (Ben Grimm), their grumpy but benevolent friend, who possesses superhuman strength and endurance. Since the original four's 1961 introduction, the Fantastic Four have been portrayed as a somewhat dysfunctional yet loving family. Breaking convention with other comic-book archetypes of the time, they would squabble and hold grudges both deep and petty, and eschew anonymity or secret identities in favor of celebrity status. Superpowers (also super powers or simply powers) is another term for superhuman abilities, that is, any abilities that a human cannot possess. ... Cosmic rays can loosely be defined as energetic particles originating outside of the Earth. ... Mr. ... “Invisible Girl” redirects here. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ...


The Fantastic Four have been adapted into other media, including four animated television series, an aborted 1990s low-budget film, the major motion picture Fantastic Four (2005), and its sequel, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007). Animated series redirects here. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Fantastic Four is a 2005 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics comic Fantastic Four. ...

Contents

Fictional biography

The Fantastic Four is formed when during an outer space test flight in an experimental rocket ship, the four protagonists are bombarded by a storm of cosmic rays. Upon crash landing back on Earth, the four astronauts find themselves transformed with bizarre new abilities. The four then decide to use their powers for good as superheroes. In a significant departure from preceding superhero conventions, the Fantastic Four make no effort to maintain secret identities as they maintain a high public profile, enjoying celebrity status for scientific and heroic contributions to society. At the same time they are often prone to arguing and even fighting with one another. Despite their bickering, the Fantastic Four consistently prove themselves to be "a cohesive and formidable team in times of crisis."[1] This article is about vehicles powered by rocket engines. ... Cosmic rays can loosely be defined as energetic particles originating outside of the Earth. ...


While there have been a number of lineup changes to the group, the four characters who debuted in Fantastic Four #1 remain the core and most frequent lineup.

  • Mister Fantastic (Reed Richards), a scientific genius, can stretch, twist and re-shape his body to inhuman proportions. Mr. Fantastic serves as the father figure of the group, and is "appropriately pragmatic, authoritative, and dull".[2] Richards blames himself for the failed space mission, particularly because of how the event transformed pilot Ben Grimm.[3]
  • Invisible Girl/Woman (Susan Storm), Reed Richards' girlfriend (and eventual wife) has the ability to bend and manipulate light to render herself and others invisible. She later develops the ability to generate force fields, which she uses for a variety of defensive and offensive effects
  • The Human Torch (Johnny Storm), Sue Storm's younger brother, possesses the ability to control fire, project burning bolts of flame from his body, and fly. The Human Torch was an update of the Golden Age character published by Marvel's predecessor Timely Comics, an android that could ignite itself. Lee said that when he conceptualized the character, "I thought it was a shame that we didn't have The Human Torch anymore, and this was a good chance to bring him back".[4] Unlike the teen sidekicks that preceded him, the Human Torch in the early stories was "a typical adolescent–brash, rebellious, and affectionately obnoxious".[5]
  • The Thing (Ben Grimm), Reed Richards' college roommate and best friend, has been transformed into a monstrous, craggy humanoid with orange, rock-like skin and super-strength. The Thing is often filled with anger, self-loathing and self-pity over his new existence. He serves as "an uncle figure, a longterm friend of the family with a gruff Brooklyn manner, short temper, and caustic sense of humor".[5] In the original synopsis Lee gave to Kirby, The Thing was intended as "the heavy", but over the years the character has become "the most lovable group member: honest, direct and free of pretension".[6]

The Fantastic Four has had several different headquarters, most notably the Baxter Building in New York City. The Baxter Building was replaced by Four Freedoms Plaza, built at the same location, after the Baxter Building's destruction at the hands of Kristoff Vernard, adopted son (and rumored half-brother of Mr. Fantastic) of the Fantastic Four's seminal villain Doctor Doom. Pier 4, a warehouse on the New York waterfront, served as a temporary headquarters for the group after Four Freedoms Plaza was condemned, due to the actions of another superhero team, the Thunderbolts. Mr. ... “Invisible Girl” redirects here. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The Baxter Building is a fictitious Manhattan 35-story office building whose five upper floors house the Fantastic Fours headquarters in the Marvel Universe. ... Kristoff Vernard (formerly known as Kristoff von Doom and Dr. Doom) is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... For other uses, see Thunderbolt (comics). ...


Publication history

The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciller) and unconfirmed inker.
The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciller) and unconfirmed inker.

Cover to Fantastic Four #1, November, 1961. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #1, November, 1961. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...

Origins

Apocryphal legend has it that in 1961, longtime magazine and comic book publisher Martin Goodman was playing golf with either Jack Liebowitz or Irwin Donenfeld of rival company DC Comics, then known as National Periodical Publications, and that the top executive bragged about DC's success with the new superhero team the Justice League of America.[7] While film producer and comics historian Michael Uslan has debunked the particulars of that story,[8] Goodman, a publishing trend-follower aware of the JLA's strong sales, directed his comics editor, Stan Lee, to create a comic-book series about a team of superheroes. According to Lee in 1974: This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Irwin Donenfeld was the son of Harry Donenfeld, cofounder of the DC Comics company, and worked for them from 1948 to 1967. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Michael Uslan is the originator of the Batman movies and was the first professor to teach Comic Book Folklore at an accredited university. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ...

Martin mentioned that he had noticed one of the titles published by National Comics seemed to be selling better than most. It was a book called The [sic] Justice League of America and it was composed of a team of superheroes. ... 'If the Justice League is selling', spoke he, 'why don't we put out a comic book that features a team of superheroes?'[9]

Lee, who had served as editor-in-chief and art director of Marvel Comics and its predecessor companies, Timely Comics and Atlas Comics for two decades, found that the medium was becoming rather restrictive. Determined "to carve a real career for myself in the nowhere world of comic books,[10] Lee concluded that: Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ...

For just this once, I would do the type of story I myself would enjoy reading.... And the characters would be the kind of characters I could personally relate to: they'd be flesh and blood, they'd have their faults and foibles, they'd be fallible and feisty, and — most important of all — inside their colorful, costumed booties they'd still have feet of clay.[11]

Lee said he created a synopsis for the first Fantastic Four story that he gave to penciller Jack Kirby, who then drew the entire story. Kirby turned in his penciled art pages to Lee, who added dialogue and captions. This approach to creating comics, which became known as the "Marvel Method", worked so well for Lee and Kirby that they utilized it from then on; the Marvel Method became standard for the company within a year.[12] A penciller (or penciler) is one of a number of artists working within the comic industry. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


Early years

The release of The Fantastic Four #1 (November 1961) was an unexpected success. The title began to receive fan mail, and Lee started printing the letters in a letter column with issue three. Also with the third issue, Lee created the slogan "The Greatest Comics Magazine in the World!!" (soon changed to "The World's Greatest Comic Magazine", which was a fixture on the issue covers into the 1990s.[13]

Fantastic Four #48 (Sept. 1966): The Watcher warns, in part one of the landmark "Galactus Trilogy". Cover art by Kirby & Sinnott.
Fantastic Four #48 (Sept. 1966): The Watcher warns, in part one of the landmark "Galactus Trilogy". Cover art by Kirby & Sinnott.

Issue four reintroduced Namor the Sub-Mariner, one of the Golden Age Timely characters, who was placed into battle against the new Human Torch (Lee explained, "I always loved the old characters"). Issue five introduced the team's most frequent nemesis, Doctor Doom. While the early stories were complete narratives, the frequent appearances of these antagonists in subsequent issues indicated the creation of a long narrative by Lee and Kirby that extended over months. Ultimately, according to comics historian Les Daniels, "only narratives that ran to several issues would be able to contain their increasingly complex ideas." [14] During its creators' lengthy run, the series produced many acclaimed storylines and characters that have become central to Marvel, including the The Inhumans, the Black Panther, the rival alien races of Kree and Skrull, Him (who would become Adam Warlock), the Negative Zone and unstable molecules. The story frequently cited as "the finest achievement"[citation needed] of the collaboration is the three-part "Galactus Trilogy" that began in Fantastic Four #48 (March 1966), about the arrival of Galactus, a cosmic being who wanted to devour the planet. Daniels noted, "The mystical and metaphysical elements that took over the sage were perfectly suited to the tastes of young readers in the 1960s", and Lee soon discovered that the story was a favorite on college campuses.[15] Cover to Fantastic Four #48, featuring the Watcher. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #48, featuring the Watcher. ... Joe Sinnott (born October 16, 1926, Saugerties, New York, United States) is an American comic book artist. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Les Daniels (born 1943) is an American writer of historical horror fiction. ... The Inhumans are a fictional race of superhumans in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... The Kree, also known as the Ruul, are a scientifically and technologically advanced militaristic alien race in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... Adam Warlock, originally known as Him, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... // The Negative Zone in the Marvel Comics Universe is used as a fictional dimension. ... Unstable molecules is a fictional piece of technology featured in Marvel Comics. ... Galactus is a fictional character, a cosmic entity in the Marvel Universe. ...


After Kirby's departure from Marvel in 1970, Fantastic Four continued with Lee, Roy Thomas, Gerry Conway and Marv Wolfman as its consecutive regular writers, working with artists such as John Romita, Sr., John Buscema, Rich Buckler and George Pérez, with longtime inker Joe Sinnott adding some visual continuity. Jim Steranko contributed a few covers as well. Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Gerard F. Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... John Romita, Sr. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... Cover to Daredevil #131. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... Joe Sinnott (born October 16, 1926, Saugerties, New York, United States) is an American comic book artist. ... Captain America #111 (March 1969): Sterankos signature surrealism. ...


John Byrne

John Byrne joined the title with issue #209 (Aug. 1979), doing pencil breakdowns for Sinnott to finish. Byrne then wrote two tales as well (#220-221, July-Aug. 1980) before writer Doug Moench and penciller Bill Sienkiewicz took over for 10 issues. With issue #232 (July 1981), the aptly titled "Back to the Basics", Byrne began his celebrated run as writer, penciller and (initially under the pseudonym Bjorn Heyn) inker. One of his key contributions to the series was the development of Invisible Girl into Invisible Woman — a self-confident and dynamic character whose newfound control of her abilities made her the most powerful member of the team. For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Doug Moench (born February 23, 1948) is an American comic book writer. ... Bill Sienkiewicz in Gijón, Spain. ...

John Byrne gets "Back to the Basics" in #232 (July 1981), his debut as writer-artist. Cover art by Byrne and inker Terry Austin.
John Byrne gets "Back to the Basics" in #232 (July 1981), his debut as writer-artist. Cover art by Byrne and inker Terry Austin.

Byrne also staked bold directions in the characters' personal lives, having the married Sue Storm and Reed Richards suffer a miscarriage, and with the Thing quitting the Fantastic Four and the She-Hulk being recruited as his long-term replacement. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x612, 80 KB) Summary Cover, The Fantastic Four #232, Marvel, July 1981, cover art by John Byrne (Pencils) Terry Austin (Inks) Source: http://comics. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x612, 80 KB) Summary Cover, The Fantastic Four #232, Marvel, July 1981, cover art by John Byrne (Pencils) Terry Austin (Inks) Source: http://comics. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Terry Austin is an American comic book artist, working primarily as an inker. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ...


1990s

Byrne was followed by a quick succession of writers (Roger Stern, Tom DeFalco, Roy Thomas), with an extended run of stories by Steve Englehart, who had Reed and Sue retire to give their son a normal childhood. The returned Thing's new girlfriend, Sharon Ventura, and Johnny Storm's former lover, Crystal, joined the team for a handful of issues. Editorial disagreements led to Englehart finishing his run under the pen name "John Harkness". Writer-artist Walt Simonson took over as writer with #334 (Dec. 1989), and three issues later began pencilling and inking as well. With brief inking exceptions, and one fill-in issue, he remained in all three positions through #354 (July 1991). The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... Tom DeFalco (born June 26, 1950) is an American comics writer and editor. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Steve Englehart (born April 22, 1947, Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American comic book writer best known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, particularly in the 1970s. ... Sharon Ventura is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Star Slammers graphic novel (1983) Walter or, usually, Walt Simonson (born September 2, 1946) is a comic book writer and artist. ... A penciller (or penciler) is one of a number of artists working within the comic industry. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ...


After another fill-in, the regular team of writer and Marvel editor-in-chief Tom DeFalco, penciller Paul Ryan and inker Dan Bulanadi took over, with Ryan self-inking beginning with #360 (Jan. 1992). That team, with the very occasional different inker, continued through for years through #414 (July 1996). DeFalco nullified the Storm-Masters marriage by retconning that the alien Skrull Empire had kidnapped the real Masters and replaced her with a spy named Lyja. Once discovered, Lyja, who herself had fallen for Storm, helped the Fantastic Four rescue Masters. Ventura departed after being further mutated by Doctor Doom. Ryan's lengthy run is behind only those of Jack Kirby and John Byrne in number of issues drawn. Tom DeFalco (born June 26, 1950) is an American comics writer and editor. ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ...


Other key developments included Franklin Richards being sent into the future and returning as a teenager, the return of Reed's time-traveling father, Nathaniel, and Reed's apparent death at the hands of a seemingly mortally wounded Doctor Doom. It would be two years before DeFalco resurrected the two characters, revealing that their "deaths" were orchestrated by the supervillain Hyperstorm. Hyperstorm is a fictional supervillain from the Marvel comics universe. ...


"Heroes Reborn" and renumbered

The ongoing series was canceled with issue #416 (Aug. 1996) and relaunched with vol. 2, #1 (Nov. 1996) as part of the multi-series "Heroes Reborn" crossover story arc. The year-long volume retold the team's first adventures in a more contemporary setting in a parallel universe. Following the end of that year-long experiment, Fantastic Four was relaunched with vol. 3, #1 (Jan,. 1998). Initially by the team of writer Scott Lobdell and penciller Alan Davis, it went after three issues to writer Chris Claremont (co-writing with Lobell for #4-5) and penciller Salvador Larroca; this team enjoyed a long run through issue #32 (Aug. 2000). Carlos Pacheco then took over as penciller and co-writer, first with Rafael Marín, then with Marín and Jeph Loeb. Heroes Reborn was an event in which Marvel Comics temporarily outsourced the production of several of its most famous comic books to the studios of its popular former employees Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... Scott Lobdell (born 1963) is an American comic book writer. ... Alan Davis (born 1956) is a British writer and artist of comic books. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Salvador Larroca (born 1964) is a Spanish comic book artist, primarily known for his work on various X-Men titles. ... The JSA roster as drawn by Pacheco and Jesus Merino Carlos Pacheco is an Spanish comic book artist and penciller. ... Rafael Marín Trechera (Cádiz, Spain, 1959) is a Spanish science fiction novelist, comic book writer and co-plotter. ... Joseph Jeph Siegbert Loeb III is an American motion picture and television producer/writer and award-winning comic book writer. ...


This series began using dual numbering, as if the original Fantastic Four series had continued unbroken, with issue #42 / #471 (June 2001). (At the time, the Marvel Comics series begun in the 1960s, such as Thor and The Amazing Spider-Man, were given such dual numbering on the front cover, with the present-day volume's numbering alongside the numbering from the original series.) The title reverted to its original numbering with issue #509 (March 2004). Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ...


Karl Kesel succeeded Loeb as co-writer with issue #51 / 480 (March 2002), and after a few issues with temporary teams, Mark Waid took over as writer with #60 / 489 (Oct. 2002), working with pencillers Mike Wieringo, Mark Buckingham, Casey Jones, and Howard Porter variously through #524 (May 2005), with a handful of issues by other teams during that time. Writer J. Michael Straczynski and penciller Mike McKone did issues #527-541 (July 2005 - Nov. 2006), with Dwayne McDuffie taking over as writer the following issue, and Paul Pelletier succeeding McKone beginning with #544 (May 2007). A writer and inker whose works have primarily been under contract for DC Comics. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Michael Lance Mike Wieringo (June 24, 1963–August 12, 2007)[1] was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics The Flash and Marvel Comics Fantastic Four. ... Mark Buckingham is an English comic book artist. ... Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Dwayne McDuffie is a comic book animation writer and a creator of the Emmy Award winning show Static Shock. ...


Spinoffs

Ancillary titles and features spun off from the flagship series include the 1970s quarterly Giant-Size Fantastic Four and the 1990s Fantastic Four Unlimited and Fantastic Four Unplugged; Fantastic Force, an 18-issue spinoff (Nov. 1994 - April 1996) featuring an adult Franklin Richards, from a different timeline, as Psilord. A spinoff title Marvel Knights 4 (April 2004 - June 2006) was written by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and illustrated by Steve McNiven in his first Marvel work. As well, there have been numerous limited series all similarly set in the main universe, designated in Marvel continuity as Earth-616. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa is an American writer whose parents were both emigrés from Nicaragua. ... Cover to Marvel Knights 4 #2, featuring the Thing. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ...


In February 2004, Marvel launched Ultimate Fantastic Four, a version of the group in the "Ultimate Marvel" alternate universe. Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ...


The Human Torch solo

The Human Torch was given a solo strip in Strange Tales in 1962 in order to bolster sales of the title.[16] The series began in Strange Tales #101 (Oct. 1962), in 12- to 14-page stories plotted by Lee and initially scripted by his brother, Larry Lieber, and drawn by penciller Kirby and inker Dick Ayers. Here, Johnny was seen living with his elder sister, Susan, in fictional Glenview, Long Island, New York, where he continued high school and, with youthful naiveté, attempted to maintain a "secret identity". (In Strange Tales #106 (Mar. 1963), Johnny discovered that his friends and neighbors knew of his dual identity all along, from Fantastic Four news reports, but were humoring him.) Supporting characters included Johnny's girlfriend, Doris Evans, usually in consternation as Johnny cheerfully flew off to battle bad guys. (She was seen again in a 1970s issue of Fantastic Four, having become a heavyset but cheerful wife and mother). Ayers took over the penciling after ten issues, later followed by original Golden Age Human Torch creator Carl Burgos and others. The FF made occasional cameo appearances, and the Thing became a co-star with issue #123 (Aug. 1964). Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... Larry Lieber (born October 26, 1931) is a comic book artist and writer and is the younger brother of Marvel Comics writer/editor Stan Lee. ... Richard Dick Ayers is a comic book artist and cartoonist, born April 28th, 1924, in Ossining, New York. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... The Human Torch is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... Carl Burgos is an American comic book and advertising artist, born April 18, 1917, New York City; died 1984. ...


The Human Torch shared the "split book" Strange Tales with fellow feature "Doctor Strange" for the majority of its run, before finally flaming off with issue #134 (July 1965), replaced the following month by "Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.". The Silver Age stories were republished in 1974, along with some Golden Age Human Torch stories, in a short-lived ongoing Human Torch series. Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... For the French hip hop artist, see Nikkfurie. ...


A later ongoing solo series in Marvel's manga-influenced "Tsunami" line, Human Torch, ran 12 issues (June 2003 - June 2004), followed by the five-issue limited series Spider-Man/Human Torch (March-July 2005), an "untold tales" team-up arc spanning the course of their friendship.


The Thing solo

The "ever-lovin', blue-eyed Thing", as Ben Grimm sometimes refers to himself, appeared in two team-up issues of Marvel Feature (issues 11-12, Sept. - Nov. 1973). Following their success, he was given his own regular team-up title Marvel Two-in-One, co-starring with Marvel heroes not only in the present day but occasionally in other time periods (fighting alongside the Liberty Legion in #20 and Doc Savage in #21, for example) and in alternate realities. The series ran 100 issues (Jan. 1974 - June 1983), with seven summer annuals (1976–1982), and was immediately followed by the solo title The Thing #1-36 (July 1983 - June 1986). Another ongoing solo series, also titled The Thing, ran eight issues (Jan.-Aug. 2006). Marvel Feature was the name of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics in the 1970s. ... Marvel Two-In-One Annual #2, 1977. ... The Liberty Legion is a fictional superhero team in the Marvel Comics universe, created in 1976 and set during World War II. Comprised of existing heroes from Marvels 1940s Golden Age predecessor, Timely Comics, the team was assembled and named by writer Roy Thomas in a story arc running... Doc Savage is a fictional character, one of the pulp heroes of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ...


For a list including one-shots, limited series, graphic novels, and trade paperback collections, see Thing bibliography. In the American comic book industry, the term one-shot is used to denote a pilot comic or a stand-alone story created to last as one issue. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... In comics, a trade paperback (TPB or simply trade) specifically refers to a collection of stories originally published in comic books reprinted in book format, usually capturing one story arc from a single title or a series of stories with a connected story arc or common theme from one or... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ...


Supporting characters

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ...

Allies and supporting characters

 

Agatha Harkness is a fictional character, a powerful witch in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Thing and Alicia Masters. ... Alyssa Moy is a character in the Marvel comics universe. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... // History In Marvel Comics, the Captain Britain Corps is a league of super-heroes all known as or as an alternate version of Captain Britain. ... Alysande Stuart is a fictional character appearing in X-Men stories in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... In the fictional Marvel Comics universe, the Fantastic Force was a short-lived superhero team that was a spin-off of the Fantastic Four. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... H.E.R.B.I.E. is a fictional robot from the Marvel Universe, and an ally of the Fantastic Four. ... The Inhumans are a fictional race of superhumans in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Black Bolt (Blackagar Boltagon) is a fictional character that appears in the Marvel Universe and king of the offshoot of humanity known as the Inhumans. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Medusa is a fictional character, a superhero in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Gorgon is the name of two fictional superhumans from the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Karnak is a fictional character on the Marvel Universe. ... Triton is a superhuman in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Lockjaw is a Marvel Comics character who is a member of the specially bred race of Inhumans. ... Kristoff Vernard (formerly known as Kristoff von Doom and Dr. Doom) is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Lyja is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Sharon Ventura is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Nathaniel Richards is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... New Avengers is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Echo, also known as Ronin, is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine and a supporting character of Daredevil. ... Iron Fist (Daniel Rand) is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and a practitioner of martial arts. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew) is a superheroine, a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... Nova (Frankie Raye) is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the 1965 American military operation, see Operation Power Pack For other uses of the term, see Power pack The Power Pack is a team of fictional child superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... Thundra is a Marvel Comics superheroine who is often aligned with the Fantastic Four. ... Valeria Richards is a fictional character of Marvel Comics, the daughter of Mister Fantastic (Reed Richards) and the Invisible Woman (Susan Storm Richards), husband and wife and two members of the superhero team the Fantastic Four. ... Willie Lumpkin is a fictional supporting character in the Marvel Universe, who is best known as the mailman of the Fantastic Four in their self-titled comic book. ... Adam Warlock, originally known as Him, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Wundarr the Aquarian is a Marvel Comics character created by Steve Gerber and Val Mayerik in Adventure into Fear #17. ... Wyatt Wingfoot - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... In the fictional Marvel Comics universe, Uatu is the member of the extraterrestrial species known as the Watchers assigned to observe Earth and its solar system. ...

Antagonists

Annihilus, sometimes called the Living Death That Walks, is a Marvel Comics supervillain. ... Blastaar, sometimes called the Living Bomb-Burst, is a Marvel Comics supervillain. ... Diablo (Esteban Corazon de Ablo) is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe who is an enemy of the Fantastic Four. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Dragon Man is a fictional supervillain in Fantastic Four and Marvel Comics Dragon Man was an android built by Gregson Gilbert as an experiment. ... Ego the Living Planet is a fictional extraterrestrial being that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #36 The Frightful Four are a group of fictional characters in Marvel Comics who serve as the opposite number to the Fantastic Four. ... Galactus is a fictional character, a cosmic entity in the Marvel Universe. ... Hyperstorm is a fictional supervillain from the Marvel comics universe. ... The Impossible Man is a mischievous alien from Marvel Comics who is, on his rare appearances, usually an antagonist of the Fantastic Four. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Spoiler warning: Kang the Conqueror is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. ... Klaw, the self-styled Master of Sound, is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Mad Thinker is a Marvel comics supervillain. ... The Mole Man is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Psycho-Man is a fictional supervillain from Marvel Comics, created by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. ... The Puppet Master, real name Phillip Masters, is a supervillain in the Fantastic Four comics. ... Ronan the Accuser is a Marvel Comics alien primarily used as a supervillain, although he has been depicted as an anti-hero in subsequent story lines. ... Iron Man in the clutches of the Red Ghost and his super-apes. ... Salems Seven was a team of magical supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... The Super-Skrull (Klrt) is a fictional character who appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Terminus is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Terrax the Tamer is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

Other versions

The End

Main article: Fantastic Four: The End

Fantastic Four: The End is a six-issue limited series depicting a possible future in which the members of the Fantastic Four have become estranged after an epic battle with Dr. Doom, resulting in the deaths of Franklin Richards and Valeria Richards, the children of group leader Reed Richards (Mr. Fantastic) and his wife Susan Storm (the Invisible Woman). The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Valeria Richards is a fictional character of Marvel Comics, the daughter of Mister Fantastic (Reed Richards) and the Invisible Woman (Susan Storm Richards), husband and wife and two members of the superhero team the Fantastic Four. ... Mr. ... “Invisible Girl” redirects here. ...


Exiles

At the end of Exiles #95 a Fantastic Four that consists of Susan Storm, Johnny Storm, Victor von Doom, and the Hulk is revealed. They will appear in Exiles through issue #99, as it is a 5-part story arc. The Exiles are a group of fictional comic book characters from Marvel Comics. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... The Exiles are a group of fictional comic book characters from Marvel Comics. ...


MC2

In the MC2 continuity the group has become the Fantastic Five. The team consists of the Human Torch, Ms. Fantastic (Lyja), Psi-Lord (Franklin Richards), Big Brain (a robot with the mind of Reed Richards), and the Thing when the line and their own short-lived title launched. Through later guest appearances in Spider-Girl, we have seen a team consisting of the twin offspring of the Thing (Grim and Rad), the son of Johnny and Lyja (Torus AKA Super-Storm), Kristoff von Doom, Spider-Girl and Psi-Lord taking the place of Fantastic Five briefly. Eventually Susan Storm and Reed Richards return from the Negative Zone to rejoin the team. The most recent line-up consists of the Torch, Ms. Fantastic, Thing, Grim, and Psi-Lord. Fantastic Five is the name of superhero team that exist in the MC2 universe, an alternate future to the Marvel Universe. ... Lyja is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Kristoff Vernard (formerly known as Kristoff von Doom and Dr. Doom) is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the Marvel Comics character who is the daughter of Spider-Man, see Spider-Girl. ...


Ultimate Fantastic Four

Set in the Ultimate Marvel universe, this version involves a more youthful version of the team. Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ...


In other media

There have been four The Fantastic Four animated TV series and three feature films (though one of the movies went unreleased, and is only available in a widely circulated bootleg). The Fantastic Four also guest-starred in the "Secret Wars" story arc of the 1990s Spider-Man animated series as well as in the "Fantastic Fortitude" episode of the 1996 Hulk series. There was also a very short-lived radio show in 1975 that adapted early Kirby/Lee stories, and is notable for casting a pre-Saturday Night Live Bill Murray as the Human Torch. Also in the cast were Bob Maxwell as Reed Richards, Cynthia Adler as Sue Storm, Jim Pappas as Ben Grimm and Jerry Terheyden as Doctor Doom. Other Marvel characters featured in the series included Ant-Man, Prince Namor, Nick Fury and the Hulk. Stan Lee narrated the series, and the scripts were taken almost verbatim from the comic books. The team made only one other audio appearance, on the Power Records album The Amazing Spider-Man and Friends. The Way It Began featured Stan Lee himself in the role of Johnny Storm and saw Ben Grimm reliving the origin of the FF, before leaving the Baxter Building to find their original nemesis the Mole Man, and a possible cure for Alicia's blindness. The story was never followed up on any further Power Records albums. In 1979, the Thing was featured as half of the Saturday morning cartoon Fred and Barney Meet the Thing. The character of the Thing was given a radical make-over for the series. The title character for this program was Benji Grimm, a teenage boy who possessed a pair of magic rings which could transform him into the Thing. The other members of the Fantastic Four do not appear in the series, nor do the animated The Flintstones stars Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble, despite the title of the program. Animated series redirects here. ... This article is about Spider-Man: The Animated Series. ... In 1996, UPN brought Marvel Comics Hulk back to animated form (his last animated series was in 1982 for NBC). ... Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... This article is about the American television series. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA-winning American comedian and actor. ... Mister Fantastic is a Marvel Comics superhero who is the leader of the Fantastic Four. ... The Invisible Woman, real name Susan Richards, née Susan Storm, formerly the Invisible Girl, is a fictional superhero who is a member of The Fantastic Four in the Marvel Universe. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Yellowjacket. ... For the French hip hop artist, see Nikkfurie. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Peter Pan Records was a record label specializing in childrens music which existed from the 1950s to the present. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... The Human Torch is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Universe. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... The Baxter Building is a fictitious Manhattan 35-story office building whose five upper floors house the Fantastic Fours headquarters in the Marvel Universe. ... The Mole Man is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Fred and Barney Meet the Thing was a 60-minute Saturday morning animated package show produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions from September 8, 1979 to December 1, 1979 on NBC. It contained the following segments: The New Fred and Barney Show The Thing Despite the title, the two segments remained... The Flintstones is an animated American television sitcom which ran from 1960 to 1966 on ABC. The Flintstones is about a working class Stone Age mans life with his family and his next door neighbor and best friend. ... Information Nickname(s) Twinkletoes Aliases Frederick F. Flintstone Species Human Gender Male Age Mid 30s Occupation Crane Operator Family Ed Flintstone (father), Edna Flintstone (mother), Rocksy Rubble (granddaughter), Chip Rubble (grandson), Bamm-Bamm Rubble (son-in-law) Spouse(s) Wilma Flintstone Children Pebbles Flintstone Portrayed by Alan Reed, Henry... Barney Rubble. ...


Animated Series

Fantastic Four is an animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions (with character designs by Alex Toth), based on Marvels comic book series Fantastic Four, and aired on ABC from 1967 to 1969. ... Cartoon Network Studios, formerly known as Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ... Fantastic Four is an animated series produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises and Marvel Comics Animation in the mid-1970s. ... DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (sometimes abbreviated to DFE) was a Hollywood-based animation production company, active from 1963 to 1981. ... Fantastic Four is the third animated series based on Marvels comic book series Fantastic Four. ... The Marvel Action Hour was a syndicated television block from Marvel Productions featuring animated adaptions of Marvel Comic Book heroes the Fantastic Four and Iron Man. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ...

Video games

In 1998, a side-scrolling video game was released for the Sony PlayStation home video game system / platform, based on the Fantastic Four characters. In the game you and a friend could pick among the Fantastic Four characters (along with the She-Hulk), and battle your way through various levels until you faced Doctor Doom. The game was widely panned by critics for having weak storyline and handling of the characters' powers. Namcos Pac-Man is one of the most popular video games ever made. ... PlayStation redirects here. ...


The Fantastic Four appeared in the Super NES and Sega Genesis video games based on the 1990s Spider-Man animated series and in their own multi-platform games based on the 2005 movie. This article is about Spider-Man: The Animated Series. ...


The Thing and the Human Torch appeared in the 2005 game Marvel Nemesis: Rise of the Imperfects.


All of the Fantastic Four appear as playable characters in the game Marvel: Ultimate Alliance, although they only had small and rather unimportant roles in the story.


The Human Torch has an appearance in a mini-game where you race against him in all versions of the Ultimate Spider-Man game except for Game Boy Advance. Ultimate Spider-Man is a video game based on the comic book of the same name by Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley. ... “GBA” redirects here. ...


The Fantastic Four are also featured prominently in the game based on the 2005 Fantastic 4 movie. And in another game based on the second Fantastic 4 movie (released in 2007). Both games were poorly rated for many reasons, such as the fact that the stories in both games did not strictly follow the plots in the films and both games had poor graphics and gameplay.


Film

Promotional poster for Fantastic Four (2005), featuring Chris Evans, Michael Chiklis, Jessica Alba, and Ioan Gruffudd.
Promotional poster for Fantastic Four (2005), featuring Chris Evans, Michael Chiklis, Jessica Alba, and Ioan Gruffudd.

A movie adaptation of The Fantastic Four was completed in 1994 by famed B movie director/producer Roger Corman. While this movie was never released to theaters or video, it has been made available from various bootleg video distributors. The film was made on a shoestring budget and is largely mocked by fans of the comic book foursome for what they see as poor acting and disappointing special effects (at one point, The Human Torch — played by a human actor — turns into an obvious cartoon upon "flaming-on"). Download high resolution version (521x755, 72 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Fantastic Four Fantastic Four (movie) Categories: Fair use posters ... Download high resolution version (521x755, 72 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Fantastic Four Fantastic Four (movie) Categories: Fair use posters ... For other persons of the same name, see Christopher Evans. ... Michael Charles Chiklis (born August 30, 1963) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actor. ... Jessica Marie Alba (born April 28, 1981) is an American actress. ... Ioan Gruffudd (pronounced , yoe-an gri-fidh) (born October 6, 1973) is a British actor from Wales. ... The Fantastic Four is an unreleased low-budget feature film completed in 1994. ... The King of the Bs, Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... For other uses, see Bootleg. ...

The cast of the unreleased Roger Corman film The Fantastic Four (1994)
The cast of the unreleased Roger Corman film The Fantastic Four (1994)

The film was made because the studio that owned the movie rights would have lost them if it did not begin production by a certain deadline (a tactic known as creating an ashcan copy). According to producer Bernd Eichinger, Avi Arad had Marvel purchase the film for a few million dollars.[17] Image File history File links Ffmovie1994. ... Image File history File links Ffmovie1994. ... The Fantastic Four is an unreleased low-budget feature film completed in 1994. ... Captain Thunder, soon to be Captain Marvel, on the cover of the ashcan copy of Flash Comics #1. ... Bernd Eichinger (born 11 April 1949) is a German film producer and director. ... Avi Arad (Hebrew: אבי ארד) is an Israeli-American businessman. ...


Another feature film adaptation of Fantastic Four was released July 8, 2005 by Fox, and directed by Tim Story. Fantastic Four opened in approximately 3,600 theaters and despite predominantly poor reviews[18] grossed US$156 million in North America and US$329 million worldwide, weighed against a production budget of $100 million[citation needed] and an undisclosed marketing budget. It stars Ioan Gruffudd as Reed Richards/Mr. Fantastic, Jessica Alba as Susan Storm/Invisible Woman, Chris Evans as Johnny Storm/Human Torch, Michael Chiklis as Ben Grimm/The Thing and Julian McMahon as Victor Von Doom/Dr. Doom, with Stan Lee making a cameo appearance as Willie Lumpkin, the mailman. Fantastic Four is a 2005 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics comic Fantastic Four. ... Timothy Kevin Story (born March 13, 1970) is an African-American film director. ... Ioan Gruffudd (pronounced , yoe-an gri-fidh) (born October 6, 1973) is a British actor from Wales. ... Jessica Marie Alba (born April 28, 1981) is an American actress. ... For other persons of the same name, see Christopher Evans. ... Michael Charles Chiklis (born August 30, 1963) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actor. ... Julian Dana William McMahon (born 27 July 1968) is a Golden Globe-nominated Australian actor and former fashion model. ...


A sequel, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, directed by Story and written by Don Payne, with was released June 15, 2007. Despite another round of mostly poor reviews, the sequel brought in US$132 million in North America a total of US$288 million worldwide.[19] Talks are underway to produce a third movie.[20] Don Payne is a writer on The Simpsons. ...


Parodies and allusions

The 2004 Disney/Pixar animated feature The Incredibles is about a family of superheroes whose powers include stretching, super strength, invisibility/force field, and super speed. Marvel Studios chairperson Avi Arad told Entertainment Weekly that, "In the words of Stan Lee, when someone asked him about The Incredibles, he said, 'You know, it feels like I wrote it.'"[21] Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Pixars studio lot in Emeryville Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California (USA) notable for its seven Academy Awards. ... The Incredibles is a 2004 American Academy Award-winning computer-animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures, centering around a family of superheroes. ... Marvel Studios is an American television and motion picture studio based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Avi Arad (Hebrew: אבי ארד) is an Israeli-American businessman. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...


See also

The Four are a group of fictional supervillains from the comic book Planetary by Warren Ellis and John Cassaday. ... The Fantastic Four is a Marvel Comics superhero group. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Wright, Bradford W. Comic Book Nation: The Transformation of Youth Culture in America, p. 204-205. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 2001. ISBN 0-8018-7450-5
  2. ^ Wright, p. 19
  3. ^ Wright, p. 205
  4. ^ Daniels, p. 85
  5. ^ a b Wright, p. 204
  6. ^ Daniels, p. 86
  7. ^ That DC all-star superhero team had debuted in The Brave and the Bold #28 (Feb. 1960) before going on to its own hit title (premiere cover date Nov. 1960).
  8. ^ Uslan, in a letter published in Alter Ego #43 (Dec. 2004), pp. 43-44, writes:
    Irwin Donenfeld said he never played golf with Goodman, so the story is untrue. I heard this story more than a couple of times while sitting in the lunchroom at DC's 909 Third Avenue and 75 Rockefeller Plaza office as Sol Harrison and [production chief] Jack Adler were schmoozing with some of us ... who worked for DC during our college summers.... [T]he way I heard the story from Sol was that Goodman was playing with one of the heads of Independent News, not DC Comics (though DC owned Independent News). ... As the distributor of DC Comics, this man certainly knew all the sales figures and was in the best position to tell this tidbit to Goodman. ... Of course, Goodman would want to be playing golf with this fellow and be in his good graces. .eric.. Sol worked closely with Independent News' top management over the decades and would have gotten this story straight from the horse's mouth.
  9. ^ Lee, Stan, Origins of Marvel Comics (Simon and Schuster/Fireside Books, 1974), p. 16. Note: Book predates publisher's change to ampersand in corporate name.
  10. ^ Lee, Origins, p. 16:
    [My wife] Joan was commenting about the fact that after 20 years of producing comics I was still writing television material, advertising copy and newspaper features in my spare time. She wondered why I didn't put as much effort and creativity into the comics as I seemed to be putting into my other freelance endeavors. ...[H]er little dissertation made me suddenly realize that it was time to start concentrating on what I was doing — to carve a real career for myself in the nowhere world of comic books.
  11. ^ Lee, Origins, p. 17
  12. ^ Daniels, Les. Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World's Greatest Comics, p. 87. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1993. ISBN 0-8109-8146-7.
  13. ^ Daniels, p. 87
  14. ^ Daniels, p. 88
  15. ^ Daniels, p. 128
  16. ^ Daniels, p. 98
  17. ^ "The Fantastic Four-Gotten", by Terrence J. Brady
  18. ^ Rotten Tomatoes: Fantastic Four
  19. ^ Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on February 15, 2008.
  20. ^ "Fantastic Four 3 will rise." Cinema Blend. June 29, 2007.
  21. ^ Entertainment Weekly July 1, 2005: "'Fantastic' Voyage?: Fantastic Four has incredible trouble—The would-be blockbuster had a tough time getting released", by Scott Brown

Irwin Donenfeld was the son of Harry Donenfeld, cofounder of the DC Comics company, and worked for them from 1948 to 1967. ... Jack Adler is an artist who worked as an inker for DC comics. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... // Advert redirects here. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Marvel.com: Fantastic Four
  • Fantastic Four at the Grand Comic-Book Database
  • The Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators

To meet Wikipedias quality standards and conform with our NPOV policy, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

External links

  • FFPlaza.com (fansite)
  • fantasticfourheadquarters.com
  • fantasticfour.info
  • Fantastic Four cover scans
Mr. ... “Invisible Girl” redirects here. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... Annihilus, sometimes called the Living Death That Walks, is a Marvel Comics supervillain. ... Aron (the Renegade Watcher) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Devos the Devastator is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Diablo (real name Esteban Corazon de Ablo) is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe who is an enemy of the Fantastic Four. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... Ego the Living Planet is a fictional extraterrestrial being that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #36 The Frightful Four are a group of fictional characters in Marvel Comics who serve as the opposite number to the Fantastic Four. ... Galactus is a fictional character, a cosmic entity in the Marvel Universe. ... The Kree, also known as the Ruul, are a scientifically and technologically advanced militaristic alien race in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... The Mad Thinker is a Marvel comics supervillain. ... The Mole Man is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Overmind is a villain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Paibok the Power Skrull is a fictional character, a supervillain appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Psycho-Man is a fictional supervillain from Marvel Comics, created by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. ... The Puppet Master, real name Phillip Masters, is a supervillain in the Fantastic Four comics. ... Spoiler warning: Kang the Conqueror is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. ... Iron Man in the clutches of the Red Ghost and his super-apes. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... The Super-Skrull (Klrt) is a fictional character who appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Terminus is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Terrax the Tamer is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Trapster is a fictional supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Wizard (Marvel Comics) - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... H.E.R.B.I.E. is a fictional robot from the Marvel Universe, and an ally of the Fantastic Four. ... Willie Lumpkin is a fictional supporting character in the Marvel Universe, who is best known as the mailman of the Fantastic Four in their self-titled comic book. ... Lyja is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Thing and Alicia Masters. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Valeria Richards is a fictional character of Marvel Comics, the daughter of Mister Fantastic (Reed Richards) and the Invisible Woman (Susan Storm Richards), husband and wife and two members of the superhero team the Fantastic Four. ... Wyatt Wingfoot - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... Sharon Ventura is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ... Marvel Age is an imprint of Marvel Comics intended for younger audiences, including children, established in 2003. ... Fantastic Five is the name of superhero team that exist in the MC2 universe, an alternate future to the Marvel Universe. ... Fantastic Four is an animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions (with character designs by Alex Toth), based on Marvels comic book series Fantastic Four, and aired on ABC from 1967 to 1969. ... Fantastic Four is an animated series produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises and Marvel Comics Animation in the mid-1970s. ... Fantastic Four is the third animated series based on Marvels comic book series Fantastic Four. ... The Fantastic Four film series currently consists of two superhero films based on the fictional Marvel Comics team Fantastic Four. ... The Fantastic Four is an unreleased low-budget feature film completed in 1994. ... Fantastic Four is a 2005 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics comic Fantastic Four. ... The Baxter Building is a fictitious Manhattan 35-story office building whose five upper floors house the Fantastic Fours headquarters in the Marvel Universe. ... We dont have an article called Four Freedoms Plaza Start this article Search for Four Freedoms Plaza in. ... Unstable molecules is a fictional piece of technology featured in Marvel Comics. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ultimate Fantastic Four - Education - Information - Educational Resources - Encyclopedia - Music (1445 words)
Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience.
Ultimate Fantastic Four (or FF) is the Ultimate Marvel version of the superhero family, the Fantastic Four.
Like the Fantastic Four, he was physically affected by the experiment, with most of his body transformed into metal, and his legs assuming the form of cloven hooves.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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