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Encyclopedia > Fan fiction

Fan fiction (also commonly spelled as fanfiction and frequently abbreviated to fanfic or occasionally just FF or fic) is a broadly-defined term for fiction about characters or settings written by fans of the original work, rather than by the original creators. Fan fiction usually describes works which are uncommissioned by the owner of the work, and usually (but not always) works which are not professionally published. Fan fiction is defined against original fiction, which exists with its own discrete universe, and against canon works within the universe. Most fan fiction writers assume that their readers have knowledge of the canon universe in which their works are based. Before about 1965, the term fan fiction was used in science fiction fandom to designate original amateur works of science fiction published in science fiction fanzines, as opposed to fiction which was professionally published, but this usage is now obsolete; modern definitions of the term exclude original fiction from the genre and may not always exclude professional contributions. For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Science fiction fandom or SF fandom is the community of people actively interested in science fiction and fantasy literature, and in contact with one another based upon that interest. ... Look up amateur in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A science fiction fanzine is an amateur or semi-professional magazine published by members of science fiction fandom, from the 1930s to the present day. ...


Material where the author merely consciously imitates the style, voice, and/or subject of another author's work, is usually called pastiche and is generally considered a separate genre from fan fiction, though some works may in fact be both a pastiche and a fan fiction story. Unauthorized films that are derivative works are generally referred to as fan films, and fan-made comics are usually referred to as either "fan comics" or (in Japan) doujinshi; each is generally considered as a different category from "fan fiction", which is primarily considered to be literary in nature. The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ... This montage of different images is an example of a derivative work In copyright law, a derivative work is an artistic creation that includes major, basic copyrighted aspects of an original, previously created first work. ... A fan film is a film or video inspired by a film, television program, comic book or a similar source, created by fans rather than by the sources copyright holders or creators. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Dōjinshi (; also romanized as doujinshi) are self-published Japanese works, including but not limited to comic books (manga), novels, fan guides, art collections, and games. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ...


For the purpose of this article, "fan fiction" will be used in its current modern context, to refer to (usually amateur) literary derivative works.

Contents

Definitions of "fan fiction"

While it is generally agreed that fan fiction is fiction written by fans of a given story, using characters and/or settings that they themselves did not create, definitions of the concept more detailed than this—most especially regarding what can or cannot be considered fan fiction—vary widely.


Licensed novels

There is some debate over whether licensed novels based on an original work can be considered fan fiction. Some view them as a form of fan fiction because they were not written by the original creator, most especially when they are "unofficial" or not considered part of canon by the work's fandom (as is the case with most novels or comics). However, debate rages on due to the fact that unlike most other modern works accepted as "fan fiction", they are officially licensed, often have their basic plot outlines approved by the original copyright owner or his office, and are written for profit and published professionally for the mass market. This article is about the literary concept. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ... How to obtain a amature radio licence differs from country to country. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ... Mass-marketing is the process of widely marketing a mass-produced item. ...


Some see this as a sign that they should still be considered "official" and thus not fan fiction, even if they are not thought of as being part of the series proper and even in cases where they contradict the previously-established canon of the series. Others, who define fan fiction more in terms of how "canonical" it can be considered, often see such works as fan fiction due to the fact that they are not considered canonical works in a given series. This view does not appear to extend to novelizations of canon works released in other formats (such as feature films or television episodes). A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ...


Unauthorized derivative works

One of the broadest definitions of fan fiction—and one slightly different from the above—is simply "unauthorized derivative work". In this interpretation, works such as the books of the Biblical Apocrypha are sometimes used as an early example of fan fiction[citation needed], and unauthorized print sequels to popular novels such as Robinson Crusoe, including during the time period before the copyright on the story has run out, are also considered a form of fan fiction.[citation needed] However in this view, many licensed novels (see above) would not be considered fan fiction, as they are not unauthorized. This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word , meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ... Robinsonade is a literary genre that takes its name from the 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. ... For other uses, see Robinson Crusoe (disambiguation). ... Fan fiction (also spelled fanfiction and commonly abbreviated to fanfic) is fiction written by people who enjoy a film, novel, television show or other media work, using the characters and situations developed in it and developing new plots in which to use these characters. ...


As an extension of oral literature

Fan fiction is also seen by many as a modern equivalent of the oral literature tradition of shared stories. This view was initially popularized by Henry Jenkins in his book 1992 Textual Poachers, though other academic researchers such as Dr. Elizabeth Judge (who argues that "fan fiction" covers copyright-violating works from the 18th century as well) also appear to subscribe to this interpretation. Oral literature corresponds in the sphere of the spoken (oral) word to literature as literature operates in the domain of the written word. ... Henry Jenkins III (born June 4, 1958 in Atlanta, Georgia) American Scholar, currently Peter de Florez Professor of Humanities and Co-Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies program with William Uricchio. ...


In this view, retellings of fairy tales or mythology theoretically be considered fan fiction—especially if they significantly alter the original version of the story—and in this view, the television series Hercules: The Legendary Journeys could be considered a form of fan fiction based on the original Greek myths about Hercules. However, in truth such works are rarely referred to as "fan fiction", any more than a licensed novelization of a popular film would be. In this interpretation, licensed novels and other licensed derivative works may or may not be considered fan fiction. A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Hercules: The Legendary Journeys was a television series produced from 1995 to 1999, very loosely based on the tales of the classical culture hero Hercules. ... Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods and goddesses and ancient heroes and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ...


Shared universes

Also borderline on the issue are fan contributions to shared universes created by authors or a group of authors for anyone to add to, developing a whole fictional universe. A famous example of this is H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos, which has seen both professional and fan contributions over more than fifty years. A shared universe is a literary technique in which several different authors create works of fiction that share aspects such as settings or characters and that are intended to be read as taking place in a single universe. ... A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Cthulhu and Rlyeh The Cthulhu Mythos encompasses the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated horror fiction writers. ...


History

Fan fiction as it is understood now began at least as early as the 17th century, with unauthorized published sequels to such works as Don Quixote[1]; the turn of the 19th century also produced parodies and revisions of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland by authors including Frances Hodgson Burnett and E. Nesbit. There were, additionally, several fan-authored versions of Sherlock Holmes stories at that time. In the 1920s and 1930s fans of Jane Austen wrote stories based on her characters and published them in fanzines. In 1945, C. S. Lewis brought in elements (mostly Númenor, there spelt Numinor, largely because Lewis probably never saw it written out) of J. R. R. Tolkien's then largely unpublished legendarium and incorporated it into the last novel, That Hideous Strength, of his Space Trilogy (though, considering he and Tolkien were personal friends, this could be seen more as an "homage"). This article is about the fictional character and novel. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Alice in Wonderland is the widely known and used title for Alices Adventures in Wonderland, a book written by Lewis Carroll -- as well as several movie adaptations of the book -- and is also the setting for several short stories. ... Frances Hodgson Burnett Frances Burnetts blue plaque in central London Frances Hodgson Burnett, (November 24, 1849 - October 29, 1924) was an English–American playwright and author. ... Edith Nesbit (married name Edith Bland; August 15, 1858 - May 4, 1924) was an English author and poet whose childrens works were published under the androgynous name of E. Nesbit. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular subject for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... That Hideous Strength is a 1945 novel by C. S. Lewis, the final book in Lewiss theological science fiction Space Trilogy. ... The Space Trilogy, Cosmic Trilogy or Ransom Trilogy is a trilogy of three science fiction novels by C. S. Lewis. ...


The phenomenon of fan fiction as part of fandom and fan interaction was most popularized, however, through the Star Trek fandom and fanzines published in the 1960s. The first Star Trek fanzine, Spockanalia, was published in 1967 and contained some fan fiction. Many of the early zines were produced by chapters of the Leonard Nimoy Association of Fans, and included fan fiction based not only on Star Trek but on Mission: Impossible, in which Nimoy co-starred for several years after Star Trek was cancelled. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ... Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ...


Most of these fanzines were reproduced via mimeograph, and a few (such as Babel) by offset printing. Although the first commercial photocopying machine had been invented in 1959, the cost was relatively high until the mid-1970s, when reduced prices and bulk rates at local shops allowed fans to improve the quality of their publications. Mimeograph machine The Mimeograph machine (commonly abbreviated to Mimeo), or stencil duplicator was a printing machine that was far cheaper per copy than any other process in runs of several hundred to several thousand copies. ... Offset lithography printing process Offset printing is a widely used printing technique where the inked image is transferred (or offset) from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The 1970s saw an expansion of fan fiction distribution and further laid the foundations of the modern subculture surrounding the genre. Grup, the first Trek fanzine oriented toward sexually-explicit fan fiction, was first published in 1972. In 1973 Paula Smith identified and named the original character trope Mary Sue in Star Trek fan fiction, giving rise to a term that became so ubiquitous in the modern fan fiction community that it has now begun to earn a foothold in the wider English lexicon. Additionally, in 1974 Grup #3 published "A Fragment Out of Time", the first known "slash" (homoerotic) story to be published in a fanzine, although there is speculation that the Kirk/Spock story "Ring of Soshern" was distributed privately in the United Kingdom earlier than that. Mary Sue (or simply Sue) is a pejorative expression for a fictional character who is an idealized stand-in for the author, or for a story with such a character. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up lexicon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The symbolic slash, used to separate the two names in a romantic pairing, from which slash fiction takes its name. ... An example of lesbian erotica by Édouard-Henri Avril. ... James Tiberius Kirk, played by William Shatner, is the main character in the original Star Trek television series and the films based on it. ... For other uses, see Spock (disambiguation). ...


In 1975 "slash" fan fiction, and fan fiction in general, were recognized academically in a Grup article by D. Marchant. The book Star Trek Lives!, edited by Jacqueline Lichtenberg, Sondra Marshak and Joan Winston, was published by Bantam Books and distributed to bookstores and newsstands. An analysis of the Star Trek fan phenomenon, it contained an entire chapter on fan fiction. David Gerrold's The World of Star Trek (1974), included fan fiction in its chapter on fan activities. Neither book mentioned slash. Jacqueline Lichtenberg is an American science fiction author. ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ...


The late 1970s also saw the creation of more Trek fanzines as well as fan fiction for other fandoms, including The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Space 1999 and Star Wars. This time also saw the first fanzine convention in Japan and the creation of Star Trek fan clubs in Australia. In 1977, the publishers of the Star Trek fanzine Dreadnought Explorations received a cease and desist order from Paramount Pictures, however, the case was dropped when Paramount realized that the fanzine was not a professional publication. The Man from U.N.C.L.E. was an American television series that ran on NBC from September 22, 1964, to January 15, 1968, for 105 episodes (see 1964 in television and 1968 in television). ... Left to right: Barbara Bain, Catherine Schell and Martin Landau from Space:1999s second season. ... This article is about the series. ... Cease-and-desist is a legal term meaning essentially stop: It is used in demands for a person or organization to stop doing something (to cease and desist from doing it). ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ...


Both Listproc and Usenet were invented in 1980, allowing public Internet-based gatherings of fans, and wider distribution of fan fiction; the internet as a whole would later become the most widely-used method of publication of fan fiction. Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ...


In 1981 Lucasfilms Ltd. sent out a letter to several fanzine publishers asserting Lucasfilm's copyright to all Star Wars characters and insisting that no fanzine publish pornography. The letter also alluded to possible legal action that could be taken against fanzines that did not comply. Later that year, the director and legal counsel of the Official Star Wars Fan Club sent fanzine publishers a set of official guidelines. Lucasfilms supported fan publications contingent on their upholding these guidelines. Lucasfilm Ltd. ... This is a list of characters from the Star Wars franchise. ... Porn redirects here. ...


The Gopher protocol was invented in 1991, and hosted some early fan fiction archives. But it has since been replaced by the World Wide Web, which was created a year later. Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol designed for the Internet. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...


The year 1992 also saw the publication of Textual Poachers by Henry Jenkins. The text explores the nature of fan interaction with canon sources and the advent of fan fiction, slash fan fiction and the culture of fandom. Jenkins argued that "[f]anfiction is a way of the culture repairing the damage done in a system where contemporary myths are owned by corporations instead of owned by folk." His work has had a strong influence on the academic study of fan fiction, and also has lent to the view of fandom and fan fiction as analogous to the oral folk tradition.


Fan fiction has become increasingly more popular and widespread since the advent of the World Wide Web. Many archives such as The Gossamer Project were created, hosting specific sorts of stories, or stories for specific fandoms. In 1998 FanFiction.Net came online. At the time of its initial creation, it accepted any sort of writing, original or fan fiction. It has since separated its original fiction section to another website and banned several subgenres, including explicitly sexual stories (referred to as "NC-17" before the Motion Picture Association of America chose to enforce its ownership of the MPAA ratings system), real person fiction, and stories featuring song lyrics (the latter two in order to avoid legal problems, including copyright infringement for unauthorized use of lyrics). This ability to self-publish fan fiction at a common archive, and the ability to review the stories directly on the site, became popular quite quickly. FanFiction.net now hosts millions of stories in dozens of languages, and is widely considered the largest and most popular fan fiction archive online.[citation needed]LiveJournal (founded in 1999) and other blogging services played a large part in the move away from mailing lists to blogs as a means for fan communication and the sharing of fan fiction; although much fan fiction today is published to archives, it would be impossible to tell whether more or less fan fiction today is posted directly to blogging services than to fan-fiction-specific archives. The Gossamer Project is a group of specialty archives which, combined, contain the vast majority of X-Files fan fiction on the Internet. ... FanFiction. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The MPAA film rating system is used in the United States and its territories to rate a movies suitability for certain audiences. ... Real Person Fiction (RPF) is a type of fan fiction featuring celebrities or other real people. ... The Cathach of St. ... LiveJournal (often abbreviated LJ) is a virtual community where Internet users can keep a blog, journal, or diary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A mailing list is a collection of names and addresses used by an individual or an organization to send material to multiple recipients. ...


For a more detailed timeline of fan fiction see the Fanfic Symposium.


Formats of fan fiction

There are three usual distinctions of fan fiction based on length, which are common to most fan fiction archives. Chaptered "fic" is written in a similar manner to traditional serial stories, with each chapter released separately as it is finished. Chapters may take anything from a day to several months to be updated and often remind readers of their place in the story with each new installment. Most archives allow two authors to upload individual chapters sequentially under a single title with a main link to the first chapter, and each chapter easily linked to via a drop down menu. A subgenre of this is seen in fan fiction groups frequently organised by comic book fan fiction writers which not only feature series starring certain characters but create a full shared universe much like a comic book company. The term serial refers to the intrinsic property of a series —namely its order. ...


These stories are a form of webserial, although that term is not common in fan fiction circles. They are often described as "epics" or "series". Until they are finished, they are referred to as Works in Progress or WIPs. On message boards and mailing lists, where the chapters are not easily consolidated, the chapter is usually marked as a number of the total chapters expected: 2/4, or 13/?. Authors will also often leave a link in each part to previous parts for readers who may not have seen the previous chapters updated. A webserial is a written work of literature available primarily or solely on the Internet. ...


Sometimes, creative writers may release a chapter that acts as a trailer for a webserial or series they might do. This can be done by having bold, italics, underlines etc., or combinations of these editing tools to denote things like: actions, characters' speech, voice-overs, graphics, or audio. These things combined may describe a trailer, which the reader can construct in his/her mind, much like a written storyboard of a cinematic trailer. A voice-over is a narration that is played on top of a video segment, usually with the audio for that segment muted or lowered. ...


Single-chapter stories of any length are usually referred to as one-shots. Stories with two chapters are sometimes called two-shots, although this can also refer to a one-shot and its sequel. There are various terms for different lengths and they are sometimes used interchangeably. These include "flashfic" for stories under 500 words, and short-short for stories between 500 and 1,000 words. The term "ficlet" is also commonly used for stories under approximately 1,000 words. A piece of fan fiction is usually considered "long" if over 1,000 words, although it can still be considered a short story up to about 20,000 words in terms of professional publishing, and a novella or novelette can describe a story between 20,000 and 40,000 words.[1] Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... A novelette (or novelet) is a piece of short prose fiction. ...


A drabble is traditionally a story exactly 100 words in length. However, when a story is referred to as a drabble, it often is a short scene or idea that does not tell an entire story, or a story at all. It is simply a reflections of a moment in time, somewhat similar to a character sketch. In fan fiction writing circles, many fandoms have a drabble community which sets a weekly prompt for authors to use in a drabble. A prompt can be a motif such as "faith" or "mothers", a specific situation such as "someone is bleeding", an object, a line of poetry, an instruction such as "only dialogue", or "from the point of view of a minor character", etc. Some authors also regularly ask their friends to give them a prompt, or a specific pairing for them to write a story from. The resulting stories are more and more often referred to as drabbles, and the meaning has extended in some places to include anything that is less than 500 words. A Drabble is an extremely short work of fiction with exactly one hundred words (although some have extended this to mean short story of less than 500 words). The purpose of the drabble is brevity and to test authors ability to express interesting and meaningful ideas in an extremely...


A character sketch is generally either a one-or-two shot in which the author looks mainly at what a certain character is like, and how they are feeling. Many character sketches fall under the genres of either "drama" or "angst", but they can be found under any genre. These fictions generally aim to make the reader reflect on their feelings towards the character, but they also often make the reader think about themselves. They are best described, perhaps, as philosophical.


In manga-based fandoms, textual fan fiction and fan produced manga can also come under the term dōjinshi (also sometimes romanized as doujinshi). This is a Japanese term for self-published works, usually manga, novels, fan guides, art collections, or games, often sold in small runs for a minor profit. While most dōjinshi featuring fan fiction is not technically legal under Japanese copyright law, the general practice of most copyright owners is to allow it, on the grounds that it keeps fans interested in the original work and fosters the talent of amateur artists and writers who may choose to go professional, such as Clamp. This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Dōjinshi ) are self-published Japanese works, usually manga or novels. ... Languages can be romanized in a variety of ways, as shown here with Mandarin Chinese In linguistics, romanization (or Latinization, also spelled romanisation or Latinisation) is the representation of a word or language with the Roman (Latin) alphabet, or a system for doing so, where the original word or language... Tug of war is an easily organized, impromptu game that requires little equipment. ... Japanese copyright laws consist of two parts: Authors Rights, and Neighboring Rights, and as such, copyright is a convenient collective term rather than a single concept in Japan. ... Clamp (officially typeset as CLAMP) is an all-female Japanese mangaka group. ...


Fan fiction is also occasionally written in script format, although Fanfiction.net has banned all these stories. There are several subgenres of "scriptfic". Some are written in the style of screenplays. While most are not written in the format of professional scripts, most do have the basic structure and are written in the present tense. Others are "chatfics", stories which are written like an instant messaging or chatroom conversation between characters, usually as a comedic exercise; "chatfics" are somewhat similar in this sense to an epistolary novel, though usually much shorter. Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text. ... A chat room is an online forum where people can chat online (talk by broadcasting messages to people on the same forum in real time). ... Titlepage of Aphra Behns Love-Letters (1684) An epistolary novel is a novel written as a series of documents. ...


Another format of fanfiction is the songfic format, where authors take the lyrics of a song and, with the song as inspiration, construct a piece of writing around the lyrics. Usually this is done by quoting lines of the lyrics in order and inserting original writing in-between. However, this format is controversial, due to copyright complications. Fanfiction.net has banned songfics because of this reason, but there are still many songfics on the site. (See also filk.) Songfics are a genre of artwork similar to fanfiction and filks. ... Filk is a form of music created from within fandom, and performed generally late at night at science fiction conventions. ...


Fan fiction is occasionally produced in an audio theatre format and released in the form of a podcast. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Radio drama. ... A podcast is a digital media file, or a series of such files, that is distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and personal computers. ...


Reviewing and interactivity in the online era

Unlike traditional print publication, the internet offers the option of giving and receiving instantaneous feedback. As such, most fan fiction archives feature a "review" system where readers can post comments about the story via form, to what is sometimes referred to as the "review board" (reviews page) of a story. These systems often are programmed to notify the author of new reviews, making them a common way for readers and authors online to communicate directly. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Feedback loop. ...


Since many such sites do not automatically moderate these systems, on such sites the systems are often abused and used to send flames, spam or trolling messages. For this reason, many such unmoderated systems allow the author the option of receiving only "signed" (non-anonymous) reviews, and many sites that sport such systems feature the suggestion to reviewers that they take the opportunity to give the author some constructive criticism. Look up flaming in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about electronic spam. ... A Do not feed the troll image In Internet terminology, a troll is someone who comes into an established community such as an online discussion forum, and posts inflammatory, rude, repetitive or offensive messages designed intentionally to annoy or antagonize the existing members or disrupt the flow of discussion, including... Constructive criticism (often shortened to CC or concrit) is the process of offering valid and well-reasoned opinions about the work of others, usually involving both positive and negative comments, in a friendly manner rather than an oppositional one. ...


Recently fan fiction has seen greater use of the forum format. Built around message board systems, stories are posted on threads with feedback interlaced and immediate. This style of fan fiction is more interactive but also can be a distraction since the stories and comments are between each other. Additionally, blogs, which typically allow entries to be sorted by topic with the additional option of receiving commentary on each entry, are also a somewhat popular choice for fan fiction postings. Gaia Online, the largest English language forum-based community as of April 2005 — powered by a modified version of phpBB. An Internet forum is a web application which provides for discussion, often in conjunction with online communities. ...


These communication methods make fan fiction sites and blogs useful affinity spaces as writers are able to take readers' feedback and improve their skills and abilities as writers. This informal learning is a side benefit for many fan fiction authors, some of whom eventually attempt or go on to writing professionally. Affinity spaces are places where informal learning takes place. ... Informal learning is to be understood as unorganized and not formally defined learning at home and at work. ...


It is often considered wise in fan fiction circles to acquire the aid of a "beta reader", often shortened to just "beta", whose responsibilities are roughly those of a professional editor to a commercial author—with the exception that the "beta" is most commonly a volunteer who works without pay and on a casual basis, usually though not exclusively through E-mail or private message systems. Writers are discouraged in some circles from posting fan fiction that has not at least been checked for grammatical, spelling, consistency and plot errors by a beta reader, though other sites such as FanFiction.net merely encourage feedback after a story has been posted. A beta reader (or betareader) is a person who reads a work of fan fiction with critical eye with the aim to improve grammar, spelling, characterization, and general style of the story prior to release to the general public. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A shoutbox or tagboard is a chat-like feature of some websites that allow people to quickly send messages to each other without requiring a post to a standard Internet forum or the use of a separate medium such as IRC. In their simplest form, they are simply a list...


Subgenres

Fan fiction is now found in a variety of genres with sites specializing in each. Sites can be found by star, by TV show, by books (such as the Harry Potter Fanfiction forums), and by style of story such as mystery, crime shows, crossover, or romance (for the "shippers"). A growth in part due to the internet, it is expected that these specialized sites will only continue to grow in popularity. Shipping, derived from the word relationship, is a general term for fans emotional and/or intellectual involvement with the ongoing development of romance in a work of fiction. ...


For common terminology relating to fan fiction, including some specialized subgenre terms, see the sub-article Fan fiction terminology. The community surrounding modern fan fiction has generated a considerable amount of slang and jargon over the past several decades. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Collaborative fiction is a form of writing by two or more authors who take it in turns to write a portion of the story. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Original character. ... Fanon is a fact or ongoing situation related to a television program, book, movie, or video game that has been used so much by fan writers or among the fandom that it has been more or less established as having happened in the fictional world, but it has not actually... A ficathon is an organised fanfiction writing event. ... Some furry fans create and wear costumes of their characters, commonly known as fursuits Furry fandom is a fandom distinguished by its enjoyment of anthropomorphic, often humanoid, animal characters. ... There are many legal issues in fan fiction, most prominently arising under United States copyright law . ... Quizillas logo. ...

References

  1. ^ Rana Eros, [http://www.trickster.org/symposium/symp162.html "When Size Matters: Story Terminology as Determined by Word Count"], The Fanfic Symposium.

The Best Fanfiction Writer In The History Of The World


Further reading

  • Hellekson, Karen, and Kristina Busse. Fan fiction and fan communities in the age of the Internet: new essays. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co., 2006. ISBN 0786426403.
  • Pugh, Sheenagh. The Democratic Genre: Fan Fiction in a Literary Context. Bridgend, Wales: Seren, 2005. ISBN 1854113992.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fan fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1941 words)
Fan fiction (also commonly spelled as fanfiction and frequently abbreviated to fanfic) is a broadly defined term for fiction about characters or settings written by fans of the original work, rather than by the original creators.
Fan fiction is also seen by many as a modern equivalent of the oral literature tradition of shared stories.
Fan fiction as it is understood now began at least as early as the 17th century, with unauthorized published sequels to such works as Don Quixote[1]; the turn of the 19th century also produced parodies and revisions of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland by authors including Frances Hodgson Burnett and E.
fan fiction: Information from Answers.com (1985 words)
Fan fiction is a broadly defined term for fiction about characters or settings written by fans of the original work, rather than by the original creators.
Fan fiction as it is understood now began at least as early as the 18th century, with unauthorized published sequels to such works as Robinson Crusoe; the turn of the 19th century also produced parodies and revisions of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland by authors including Frances Hodgson Burnett and E.
While most dôjinshi featuring fan fiction is not technically legal under Japanese copyright law, the general practice of most copyright owners is to allow it, on the grounds that it keeps fans interested in the original work and fosters the talent of amateur artists and writers who may choose to go professional, such as CLAMP.
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