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Encyclopedia > Family First Party
Family First Party
Family First Party Logo
Leader Steve Fielding
Founded 2002
Office PO Box 1042
Campbelltown SA 5074
Political Ideology Social conservatism,
"Family values"
Website www.familyfirst.org.au

The Family First Party is a political party in Australia. Its policies emphasise socially conservative family values. Image File history File links Family First Party logo This work is copyrighted. ... Steven Fielding (born 17 October 1960), Australian politician, is parliamentary leader of the Family First Party. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Campbelltown is a suburb of Adelaide in the City of Campbelltown. ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... Social conservatism generally refers to a political ideology or personal belief system that advocates the conservation or resurrection of what one, or ones community, considers to be traditional morality and social structure. ... This article is about family values as a political concept. ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Social conservatism generally refers to a political ideology or personal belief system that advocates the conservation or resurrection of what one, or ones community, considers to be traditional morality and social structure. ... This article is about family values as a political concept. ...


The party was founded in South Australia in time to contest the 2002 state elections, when former Assemblies of God pastor Dr Andrew Evans became its first MLC, winning a seat in the South Australian Legislative Council. A second MLC, pharmaceutical executive Dennis Hood, was elected at the 2006 South Australian election. For the song, see South Australia (song). ... Legislative elections for State Parliament were held in South Australia on 9 February 2002. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Legislative Council in British constitutional thought is the second-to-top tier of a government led by a Governor-General, Governor or a Lieutenant-Governor, inferior to an Executive Council and equal to or superior to a Legislative Assembly. ... The Legislative Council chamber circa 1939 The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of parliament in the Australian state of South Australia. ... Dennis Hood (born 1970) is an Australian politician and the Family First Partys second representative in the South Australian Legislative Council, having won his seat in the 2006 South Australian Legislative Elections. ... Legislative elections for the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia on March 18, 2006. ...


In the October 2004 federal election it contested seats all over Australia, generally exchanging preferences with Liberal candidates (but in some seats exchanging preferences with the Australian Labor Party). At that election the party was successful in electing their first and at present only federal politician Steve Fielding, Senator for Victoria. No candidates were elected at the 2007 federal election, however it is likely that Fielding will share the balance of power in the Senate with independent Nick Xenophon and the Australian Greens once the new Senate meets in mid-2008. Federal elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ... Preferential voting (or preference voting) is a type of ballot structure used in several electoral systems in which voters rank a list or group of candidates in order of preference. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... ALP redirects here. ... Steven Fielding (born 17 October 1960), Australian politician, is parliamentary leader of the Family First Party. ... Type Upper house President Alan Ferguson, Liberal since 14 August 2007 Members 76 Political groups Coalition (39) ALP (28) Green (4) Democrat (4) FFP (1) Last elections 9 October 2004 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site Senate Entrance to the Senate Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State... Motto: Peace and Prosperity Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Governor HE Mr John Landy Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Area 237,629 km² (6th)  - Land 227,416 km²  - Water 10,213 km² (4. ... The 2007 election for the federal Parliament of Australia, in which 13. ... In parliamentary politics, balance of power usually refers to the position held by a political party, or a coalition of minor parties whose support of a minority government in a parliamentary chamber can give the governing party enough voting strength to maintain stable government. ... Hon. ... The Australian Greens, commonly known as The Greens, is a Green Australian political party. ...


Although officially secular and eschewing religious labels, many of its candidates and members are from conservative Christian backgrounds. This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The Christian Right, is a broad label applied to a number of political and religious movements with particularly conservative and right wing views. ...

Contents

Structure

Family First is incorporated as a limited liability company[1] overseen by a Board of Directors. A National Conference occurs at least once every two years for policy formulation and to endorse candidates. Federal and State branches have Annual General Meetings that are open to all members.[citation needed]


Political relations

Family First and the Australian Greens are often at odds, with Family First often referring to the Greens as "extreme" in their media statements[2]. The two parties are in competition for Senate preferences, particularly from the Labor Party, and ideologically opposed on many issues[3][4]. In the 2006 Victorian election, Family First's limited television advertising campaign specifically singled out the Greens for criticism [5]. The Australian Greens, commonly known as The Greens, is a Green Australian political party. ... ALP redirects here. ...


Relations between Family First and Fred Nile's Christian Democratic Party (Australia) are strained by the need to compete for the same group of voters and to secure Senate preferences, particularly from the Liberal Party of Australia. Rev Hon Fred Nile MLC Frederick John Nile (born 15 September 1934), Australian politician, clergyman and social activist, has been a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council since 1981, except for a period in 2004 when he resigned to contest (unsuccessfully) the Australian Senate at the 2004 federal... The Christian Democratic Party (CDP) is a minor political party in Australia. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ...


Election Results

2002 South Australian Election

The first election Family First contested was the 2002 South Australian Election. Dr Andrew Evans received a primary vote of 4.02% [2] which, with preferences from other parties, was sufficient to get him elected to one of the 11 seats available in the South Australian Legislative Council. Legislative elections for State Parliament were held in South Australia on 9 February 2002. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Legislative Council chamber circa 1939 The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of parliament in the Australian state of South Australia. ...


2004 Federal Election

The party agreed to share House of Representatives preferences with the Liberal-National Coalition at the 2004 election [3] (with some exceptions discussed below). This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... The Coalition in Australian politics refers to the grouping of two political parties that has existed in the form of a coalition agreement since 1922, with only brief breaks (e. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ...


Family First did better than expected at the election[citation needed], picking up 1.76 percent of the vote nationally, and outpolling the Australian Democrats by more than 40,000 votes. This resulted in an unexpected victory in Victoria, where candidate Steve Fielding was elected on preferences to the Federal Senate, despite receiving significantly fewer primary votes (56,376 or 1.88% Group Totals) than The Greens' David Risstrom (263,551 or 8.80% Group Totals). The Australian Democrats is an Australian political party which was formed in 1977 through a merger of the Australia Party and the Liberal Movement after principals of those minor parties secured the commitment of former Liberal minister Don Chipp as a high-profile leader[1]. The new party was based... Motto: Peace and Prosperity Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Governor HE Mr John Landy Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Area 237,629 km² (6th)  - Land 227,416 km²  - Water 10,213 km² (4. ... Steven Fielding (born 17 October 1960), Australian politician, is parliamentary leader of the Family First Party. ... The Australian Greens, commonly known as The Greens, is a Green Australian political party. ... David Risstrom is a Melbourne barrister, a former Melbourne city councillor, and a former Australian Greens candidate for Victoria. ...


The party also came close to picking up other Senate seats in Tasmania (largely due to surplus Liberal votes, because Liberal polled over three quotas but only stood three candidates) and in South Australia where the then party leader Andrea Mason narrowly missed out (polling 3.98% and receiving Liberal preferences). Their preferences also assisted the performance of the governing Liberal Party in several House of Representatives seats,[citation needed] such as in the highly marginal South Australian seat of Makin. Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... Andrea Mason is an Australian politician. ... The Division of Makin is located in Adelaide, South Australia. ...


State Elections since 2004

In the 2005 Western Australian Election, Family First polled just over 2% in the Legislative Council (although only contesting 5 of 6 seats)[4]. Interestingly, in 2005, the Liberal member for Ningaloo, Rod Sweetman, and Alan Cadby (who was defeated in Liberal preselection for a further term) offered to serve out their parliamentary terms as a Family First members - an offer which was rejected by Family First due to their both supporting a bill for decriminalisation of abortion in 1998.[5] Alan Cadby is an Australian politician. ...


In the 2006 South Australian election, Family First's vote increased to 4.98% in the Legislative Council,[6] and a second Member of the Legislative Council was elected - former pharmaceutical executive Dennis Hood. In several rural and outer metropolitan seats, Family First's vote approached 10% - and in the seat of Kavel, Tom Playford achieved a vote of 15.7%.[7] In the Legislative Council, Family First shares the balance of power with the other minor parties and independents. Legislative elections for the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia on March 18, 2006. ... Dennis Hood (born 1970) is an Australian politician and the Family First Partys second representative in the South Australian Legislative Council, having won his seat in the 2006 South Australian Legislative Elections. ... The Playford family has played a significant role in the South Australian and Australian political and social sphere since the early days of European settlement. ... In parliamentary politics, balance of power usually refers to the position held by a political party, or a coalition of minor parties whose support of a minority government in a parliamentary chamber can give the governing party enough voting strength to maintain stable government. ...


The 2006 Queensland State Election saw Family First receive a primary vote of 7% in contested seats (many seats were not contested), with a high of 14.5% and several other seats posting results of 10% [8] [9]. Queensland does not have an Upper House, and these results were insufficient for any candidates to be elected.


The 2006 Victorian State Election saw Family First's vote increase from 1.9% to 4.27% of first preferences [10], however no candidates were elected.


2007 Federal Election

Family First contested the 2007 federal election, in particular seeking to increase its Senate representation. Nationwide, the party received 1.62 percent of the primary vote in the Senate, and 1.99 percent in the House of Representatives, both down slightly on the 2004 result. In Victoria however, both the lower and upper house vote increased by 0.64 percent, to 2.52 and 3.02 percent respectively. No Family First candidates were elected. Sitting Senator Steve Fielding's term does not expire until 2011. The 2007 general election for the Parliament of Australia is expected to take place in November or early December, with 33 to 68 days notice. ...


Before the 2007 Elections in Australia, Fred Nile criticized Family First for giving preferences (in some states) to the Liberty and Democracy Party, a libertarian political party that as one of its policies wants to legalize recreational drug use, stating "They gave their preferences to the enemy, the anti-Christian party."[6] This was suggested as a reason for their poor election result.[7] Ironically, Fred Nile's own party had also preferenced the Liberty and Democracy Party before any other major party in the Senate.[8] Rev Hon Fred Nile MLC Frederick John Nile (born 15 September 1934), Australian politician, clergyman and social activist, has been a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council since 1981, except for a period in 2004 when he resigned to contest (unsuccessfully) the Australian Senate at the 2004 federal... The Liberty & Democracy Party (LDP) is a moderate libertarian or classical liberal Australian political party founded in 2001. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ...


Religious affiliation

Family First co-founder Pastor Andrew Evans was the General Superintendent of the Assemblies of God in Australia for twenty years[9]. In the 2002 South Australian election and the 2004 Federal Election, a number of Family First candidates were church members. In New South Wales, 11 of their 23 candidates for the 2004 federal election were from an Assemblies of God church, the Hawkesbury Church in Windsor[10] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Assemblies of God in Australia The Assemblies of God in Australia (AOG) was formed in 1937 and is the Australian organisation of the Assemblies of God, a pentecostal denomination originating in the United States of America. ... NSW redirects here. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ... Windsor is a town in New South Wales, Australia. ...


South Australian Family First Member of the Legislative Council Dennis Hood, the party's state parliamentary leader, is a member of the Rostrevor Baptist Church. When Sunday Mail columnist Peter Goers stated that Hood was an anti-evolution Creationist[11], Hood did not deny this in his response, while he did attempt to set the record straight on issues of policy.[12] Dennis Hood (born 1970) is an Australian politician and the Family First Partys second representative in the South Australian Legislative Council, having won his seat in the 2006 South Australian Legislative Elections. ... The Rostrevor Baptist Church is an evangelical Baptist Church in the suburb of Rostrevor in Adelaide. ... The Advertiser is the only local daily newspaper published in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Creationism is generally the belief that the universe was created by a deity, or alternatively by one or more powerful and intelligent beings. ...


Family First's preferencing agreement with the Coalition (Australia) in the 2004 federal election led Barnaby Joyce, the National senate candidate for Queensland, to publicly slam the party the day before the election, calling them "the lunatic Right", and stating that "these are not the sort of people you do preference deals with"[13]. Joyce's comments came in response to a pamphlet published by one of the party's Victorian Senate candidates, Danny Nalliah who in his capacity as a church pastor had criticised other religions and homosexuality. A coalition is an alliance among entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... Barnaby Thomas Gerald Joyce (born 17 April 1967), Australian politician, has been a member of the Australian Senate representing the state of Queensland since July 2005. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... Danny Nalliah (born 1964) is an Australian Christian evangelist pastor. ...


In September 2004, party leader Andrea Mason said that Family First is not a Christian party[14] and Family First Federal Secretary Dr Matt Burnet issued a press release stating: Andrea Mason is an Australian politician. ...

"The party is not a church party or an Assembly of God party, nor is it funded by AOG churches. It does see itself as socially conservative, with Family Values based on Christian ethics. Like any main-stream party we do not have on record the religious affiliations of any of our members. The Board of Reference in South Australia includes business-people, members of the medical profession, as well as ministers and people from Catholic, Baptist, Lutheran, Uniting and other church groups. The rapid national growth of the party leading into this election and the late decision to contest in all seats possible, has meant that in some states there are candidates, with strong family values, who have been introduced to the party through the personal relationships they have from their involvement in community/church networks"[15].

However, news reportage continued to associate the party with Assemblies of God, as did concerned church member Nathan Zamprogno, who commented publicly about the intersection of politics and the church.[16]


Policies

Abortion

According to their web site, Family First say that they will "seek to promote recognition and valuing of the inherent dignity of each human being from conception. In this context, Family First is opposed to the medical treatment procedure of abortion." [17]


Asylum seekers

Family First contends that it has a 'compassionate' stance towards asylum seekers, supporting fast on-shore processing. In what would have been a deciding vote, Federal leader Steve Fielding opposed the Liberal Government to ensure that asylum seekers to Australia are not processed in overseas detention facilities. This resulted in the government not proceeding with the proposed legislation [18] Steven Fielding (born 17 October 1960), Australian politician, is parliamentary leader of the Family First Party. ...


Drugs

Family First oppose harm reduction as a primary strategy for combating drug abuse, instead favouring prevention, zero tolerance, rehabilitation, and avoidance.[19] Harm reduction is a philosophy of public health, intended to be a progressive alternative to the prohibition of certain potentially dangerous lifestyle choices. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Environment

Family First's environment and resources policy states that "Family First is committed to the environment as essential to ensuring the health and happiness of future generations of families".[20]


In the South Australian parliament, Family First MPs have taken outspoken positions on environmental topics such as desalination schemes[21] and the Murray-Darling Basin[22]. Family First MPs also successfully lobbied the government to include an interim 2020 greenhouse reduction target in Climate Change legislation.[23]


In the 2006 Victorian election, Family First advocated several positions that that the Australian Conservation Foundation viewed as non-environmental[24][25]. These positions included the construction of new dams to increase water supplies [26], arguing for a reduction in fuel taxes [27], arguing against cuts to existing logging agreements, and specifically supporting continued access to public lands for "recreational fishing, shooting and hunting" [28]. The state election for the 56th Parliament of Victoria is scheduled for 25 November 2006. ... The Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) is an Australian non-profit, community-based environmental group focused on advocacy, policy research and community education for environmental reform and ecologically sustainable development. ...


Euthanasia

Family First is opposed to euthanasia, holding the view that "the duty of health carers is to promote health, relieve suffering and safeguard life". Instead, they favour palliative care. For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ... Palliative care (from Latin palliare, to cloak) is any form of medical care or treatment that concentrates on reducing the severity of disease symptoms, rather than providing a cure. ...


Sexuality

Family First opposes LGBT adoption, IVF treatment for lesbians, and opposes same-sex marriage and civil unions, stating their declaration of marriage as "a union of a man and a woman"[29]. Family First's only official LGBT rights-related policy is that "all co-dependents should not be discriminated against – whether Homosexual or not"[30]. LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ...


In the 2004 federal election the party directed preferences to the Coalition ahead of Labor except in the seats of Brisbane and Leichhardt[31]. The party's lead senate candidate in Queensland, John Lewis indicated that the reason was the public advocacy on gay issues of the Liberal candidates for those seats[32]. Federal elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. ... The Division of Brisbane is an Australian Electoral Division in Queensland. ... The Division of Leichhardt is an Australian Electoral Division in Queensland. ...


In 2006, the two SA Family First MLCs voted against the Statutes Amendment (Domestic Partners) Bill.[33]


Indigenous Australians

Family First was the first party in Australia to nominate an Aboriginal woman, lawyer Andrea Mason, as party President. The party did hope to attract a large Aboriginal vote in South Australia where Andrea Mason was touted as possibly the first Aboriginal woman to be elected to parliament. Andrea Mason is an Australian politician. ...


Although Family First's policy on indigenous Australians does not specifically address the Stolen Generation, Mason has said: "I think there is a cobweb, there is a veil over our country... in terms of this unresolved issue... I think that there will be a significant change in the way we perceive ourselves and our relationships with each other when there is an apology made to the stolen generations"[34]. Portrayal of The taking of the children on the Great Australian Clock, Queen Victoria Building, Sydney The Stolen Generation (or Stolen Generations) is a term used to describe the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, usually of mixed descent who were removed from their families, under the rationale of...


Industrial Relations

Family First is opposed to some aspects of the Howard government's Australian Workplace Agreement measures, campaigning against the measures in the Federal Senate [35], and voting against the 2005 WorkChoices legislation.[36] In his Maiden Speech, Senator Steve Fielding argued for a fairer work / rest / and 'family time' or leisure balance in opposing the measures. [37] An Australian Workplace Agreement (AWA) is an individual written agreement on terms and conditions of employment between an employer and employee in Australia, under the Workplace Relations Act 1996. ... WorkChoices, or the Workplace Relations Act 1996 as amended by the Workplace Relations Amendment (Workchoices) Act 2005, came into effect in March 2006. ... A maiden speech is the first speech given by a newly elected representative in such bodies as the House of Commons or the United States House of Representatives. ... Steven Fielding (born 17 October 1960), Australian politician, is parliamentary leader of the Family First Party. ...


Pornography

Family First's internet pornography policy calls for a "Mandatory Filtering Scheme at the ISP Server Level" as a matter of child protection.[38] Internet pornography is pornography that is distributed via the Internet, primarily via websites, peer-to-peer file sharing, or Usenet newsgroups. ... DansGuardian blocking whitehouse. ...


"It is a national travesty that is so easily fixed if the Government and the opposition would exercise their moral will and pass legislation that requires Internet Service Providers (ISP's) to provide a compulsory filtering of pornography on the Internet... Adults can elect to opt out, but we are putting ISP's on notice that greater diligence is required", said Andrea Mason in a media release on Wednesday, 25 August 2004.[39]


War in Iraq

Family First believes that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was wrong because diplomatic avenues had not been exhausted, but that having participated in that invasion Australia is now obliged to protect Iraqis and Australians in Iraq through a military presence[40]. This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


References

  1. ^ ASIC Free Company Name Search
  2. ^ http://www.stevefielding.com.au/html/media/SF%20124%20Fri%20Apr%2013%202007%20Australians%20want%20a%20party%20that%20supports%20family%20values.pdf
  3. ^ Compass - ABC TV Religion | Stories
  4. ^ Greens completely cut down to size | NEWS.com.au
  5. ^ ::Family First Party::
  6. ^ Steve Lewis. "Christian party's unholy alliance", Herald Sun, 2007-11-06. 
  7. ^ Steve Lewis. "Electorate strips landscape of the bit-part players", The Daily Telegraph, 2007-11-26. 
  8. ^ NSW_2007_GVT_A4.indd
  9. ^ Toni Hassan. "The Religion Report", Radio National, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 2004-09-29. 
  10. ^ Mike Seccombe. "Behind Family First is a clan of true believers", Sydney Morning Herald, Fairfax, 2004-09-24. 
  11. ^ "This Hood's hardly one of the boyz", Sunday Mail (Adelaide), 2006-08-13. 
  12. ^ "Family First far from extremists", Sunday Mail (Adelaide), 2006-08-27. 
  13. ^ http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,11007286%5E2702,00.html
  14. ^ Karen Barlow & Nance Haxton. "Family First Party campaigns on family values", The World Today, Australian Broadcasting Corporation Local Radio, 2004-09-20. 
  15. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/mr/ffptruth250904.pdf
  16. ^ Jana Wendt. "Hillsong: Songs of praise - and politics (Transcript)", Sunday, Nine, 2005-07-03. 
  17. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/documents/ABORTION_000.pdf
  18. ^ http://www.stevefielding.com.au/html/news/news%20articles/ffpwebnewsAdvertiser060814.pdf
  19. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/documents/ILLEGALDRUGSINCLUDINGMARIJUANA_000.pdf
  20. ^ http://familyfirst.org.au/documents/EnvironmentandResources.pdf
  21. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/ffimages/File/Upper%20South%20East%20Dryland%20Salinity%20and%20Flood%20Management.pdf
  22. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/ffimages/File/Murray-Darling%20Basin%20_Amending%20Agreement_%20Amendment%20Bill.pdf
  23. ^ http://familyfirst.org.au/ffimages/File/Climate%20Change%20&%20Greenhouse%20Emissions%20Reduction%20Bill%2027.03.07.pdf
  24. ^ http://www.acfonline.org.au/articles/news.asp?news_id=1039
  25. ^ untitled
  26. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/ffimages/File/Victoria/Pst/Water.pdf
  27. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/ffimages/File/Victoria/Pst/Petrol.pdf
  28. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/ffimages/File/Victoria/Pst/TimberAndPublicLandsPst.pdf
  29. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/documents/THEFAMILY_000.pdf
  30. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/mr/ffptruth250904.pdf
  31. ^ Dasey, Daniel. "Deal with Family First delivers for Coalition", The Sun-Herald, 10 October 2004. 
  32. ^ "Family First refuses preference swap with lesbians", The Age, 5 October 2004. 
  33. ^ Hansard of SA Legislative Council, 7 December 2006
  34. ^ Howard promises win won't go to his head - Election 2004 - www.smh.com.au
  35. ^ http://www.stevefielding.com.au/html/news/news%20articles/ffpwebnewsHeraldSun061129.pdf
  36. ^ Family First cuts ties to Libs over IR policy, AM, 30-Nov-2005
  37. ^ Parliament of Australia: Senate: Senator Fielding's First Speech
  38. ^ http://www.familyfirst.org.au/documents/INTERNETPORNOGRAPHYANDCHILDREN.pdf
  39. ^ Microsoft Word - Internet Pornography - SA.doc
  40. ^ [1][dead link]

The Herald Sun is a newspaper in Melbourne, Australia, that is published by The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd, a subsidiary of Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Telegraph is a tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Nationwide News, part of News Corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sydney Morning Herald is one of the most prestigious and important newspapers in Australia, published daily in Sydney, the largest city in Australia. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ... The Australian Democrats is an Australian political party which was formed in 1977 through a merger of the Australia Party and the Liberal Movement after principals of those minor parties secured the commitment of former Liberal minister Don Chipp as a high-profile leader[1]. The new party was based... The Australian Greens, commonly known as The Greens, is a Green Australian political party. ... ALP redirects here. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ...

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Family First Party - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1861 words)
Family First is opposed to euthanasia, holding the view that "the duty of health carers is to promote health, relieve suffering and safeguard life".
Family First opposes gay adoptions, IVF treatment for gay couples, and does not acknowledge gay civil unions (currently, same-sex marriage is not legally recognized in Australia), stating their affirmation of marriage as "a union of a man and a woman"[8].
Family First believes that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was wrong because diplomatic avenues had not been exhausted, but that having participated in that invasion Australia is now obliged to protect Iraqis and Australians in Iraq through a military presence[18].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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