FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Famagusta" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Famagusta
"Magusa" redirects here. For the moth genus, see Magusa (moth).
Famagusta (Ammochostos, Gazimağusa)
Skyline of Famagusta (Ammochostos, Gazimağusa)
District Famagusta
Population (30 April 2006 SPO census)[1]
 - Total 35,453
Time zone EET (UTC+2)

Famagusta (Greek: Ammochostos (Αμμόχωστος); Turkish: Gazimağusa or Mağusa) is a city on the east coast of Cyprus and is capital of the Famagusta District. It is located in a bay between Capes Greco and Eloea, east of Nicosia, and possesses the deepest harbour in the island. Since the 1974 Turkish invasion the city has resided in the de facto Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (recognised only by Turkey). The old tourist quarter of Varosha is abandoned pending a settlement of the Cyprus dispute. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For other uses, see Moths. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The districts (επαρχίες) are the subnational subdivisions of Cyprus. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... Famagusta District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Nicosia District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Anthem Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Sovereignty from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey   -  Independence from Cyprus   -  Declared November 15, 1983  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (not ranked) 1... Varosha (Turkish: MaraÅŸ)(Greek: Βαρώσια) was the modern tourist area of the city of Famagusta prior to the Turkish invasion in 1974. ...

Contents

Name

In antiquity, the town was known as Arsinoe (Greek: Ἀρσινόη), after Arsinoe II of Egypt, and was mentioned by that name by Strabo. It was also called Ammokhostos (meaning "hidden in sand") and it is still known by that name in Greek today. This name developed into the Famagusta used in Western European languages and the Turkish name, Mağusa. In full, its Turkish name is Gazi-Mağusa (Gazi is a Turkish prefix meaning veteran, and was awarded officially after 1974; compare Gaziantep.). Antiquity means different things: Generally it means ancient history, and may be used of any period before the Middle Ages. ... Head of Ptolemy II Philadelphus (309-246 BC), with Arsinoe II ( 316-270 BC). ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... This article is about the history and concept of ghazw and ghāzÄ«. For other meanings of gazi, see Gazi (disambiguation). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Gaziantep (Kurdish: , informally, Antep) is the capital city of Gaziantep Province in Turkey. ...


History

Founded in 300 BC on the old settlement of Arsinoe, Famagusta remained a small fishing village for a long period of time. Later, as a result of the gradual evacuation of Salamis, it developed into a small port. Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC - 300s BC - 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC Years: 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC - 300 BC - 299 BC 298 BC...


Medieval Famagusta, 1192-1571

Othello's tower in Famagusta.
Othello's tower in Famagusta.

The turning point for Famagusta was 1192 with the onset of Lusignan rule. It was during this period that Famagusta developed as a fully-fledged town. It increased in importance to the Eastern Mediterranean due to its natural harbour and the walls that protected its inner town. Its population began to increase. This development accelerated in the 13th century as the town became a centre of commerce for both the East and West. An influx of Christian refugees fleeing the downfall of Acre (1291) in Palestine transformed it from a tiny village into one of the richest cities in Christendom. In 1372 the port was seized by Genoa and in 1489 by Venice. This commercial activity turned Famagusta into a place where merchants and ship owners led lives of luxury. The belief that people's wealth could be measured by the churches they built inspired these merchants to have churches built in varying styles. These churches, which still exist, were the reason Famagusta came to be known as "the district of churches". The development of the town focused on the social lives of the wealthy people and was centred upon the Lusignan palace, the Cathedral, the Square and the harbour. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... // Events The Third Crusade ends in disaster. ... The Lusignan family originated in Poitou in western France, and in the late 12th century came to rule the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Kingdom of Cyprus. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... What is Refugees? Refugees is a simple internet community that was created as a homeland and haven for the members of the message board MegaMassMedia. ... For other uses, see Akko (disambiguation). ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... In this year, the city of Aachen, Germany begins adding a Roman numeral Anno Domini date to a few of its coins. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Events March 14 - The Queen of Cyprus, Catherine Cornaro, sells her kingdom to Venice. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ...


Ottoman Famagusta, 1571–1878

In 1570-1571, Famagusta was the last stronghold in Cyprus to hold out against the Turks under Mustafa Pasha. It resisted a siege of thirteen months and a terrible bombardment, until at last the commander, Marco Antonio Bragadin was flayed alive, his lieutenant Tiepolo was hanged, since Mustafa betrayed his word after town's surrender. [1] Lord Kinross, in his book, The Ottoman Centuries, describes the situation before the siege as follows: Events January 23 - The assassination of regent James Stewart, Earl of Moray throws Scotland into civil war February 25 - Pope Pius V excommunicates Queen Elizabeth I of England with the bull Regnans in Excelsis May 20 - Abraham Ortelius issues the first modern atlas. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Marc Antonio Bragadin (Venice, 21 April 1523 - Famagusta, 17 August 1571) was the Christian commander of forces at Famagusta which fell to the Islamic Ottoman Turks in August 1571. ... John Balfour (1904-1976), 3rd Baron of Kinross, was a writer noted for his biography of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk and other works in Islamic historiography. ...

"The Venetians had for some time neglected this far eastern outpost of their Mediterranean dominions, and its population had greatly declined. The bulk of it was composed of Greek Orthodox peasants who were enslaved and oppressed by the Frankish ruling class, and it was estimated that there were some fifty thousand serfs who would be ready to join the Turks. Sultan Selim (II) in a firman, or decree, now instructed his neighbouring sanjak bey to do his utmost to win the hearts of the masses, adding a solemn promise that in the event of the island's capture the population would not be molested and their property would be respected. Such was a formula, here strictly observed, which had for long preceded acts of Turkish expansion."

He describes the situation of the island after fall/conquest of Famagusta as follows: Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. ... Costumes of Slaves or Serfs, from the Sixth to the Twelfth Centuries, collected by H. de Vielcastel, from original Documents in the great Libraries of Europe. ... Selim II (Ottoman Turkish: سليم ثانى SelÄ«m-i sānÄ«, Turkish:)(May 28, 1524 – December 12, 1574) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1566 until his death. ... SANJAK-BEY or SANJAKBEG is the Turkish title of the Bey (high officer, but usually not a Pasha) in military and administrative command of a sanjak (usually a district, answerable to a Vali or other governor; in a few cases himself a governor, directly answering to Istanbul) of the Ottoman...

"Venice was to cede the island to the Sultan two years later in a peace treaty which allowed for compensation sufficient to cover the cost of its conquest. Its subsequent administration was enlighted enough, following the standard Ottoman practice at this time in conquered territories. The former privileges of the Greek Orthodox Church were revived at the expense of the Latin Catholics, and its property restored to it. The Latin system of serfdom was abolished. The land which had formerly belonged to the Venetian nobility was transferred to the Ottoman state. The local inhabitants were assisted by the development of economic and financial resources. Large numbers of immigrants were brought from central Anatolia, with their cattle and farming implements, to settle in the empty islands."

At last, after the great calamity which had reduced the island to misery, somehow or other the poverty-stricken inhabitants began little by little to address themselves again to the culture of the soil, to some small commerce with strangers, and to those few arts which still survived in the he towns. At the very beginning the dues and outgoings did not press so very had on the rajah, because the Porte knew how the country had been impoverished by the war: and the Pashas sent to govern it were to some extent controlled by the Porte, lest their harshness should drive the rajah to leave the island, or at least to revolt, for which his degraded condition would be an excuse. So that after fifteen or twenty years the Christians redeemed nearly all the monasteries from those who had seized them, and much of the church lands as well. Churchmen of position left money for masses for the repose of their souls, or bestowed it by way of gifts. Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: HellÄ“northódoxÄ“ EkklÄ“sía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Serf redirects here. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Sogut (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... Synonym of the government of the Ottoman Empire. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Changes in social and cultural life had a major effect on the architectural and physical environment. In order to adjust to the socio- economic and cultural traditions of the new inhabitants, some changes were made to existing buildings. Only the main cathedral was turned into a mosque (Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque), and the bazaar and market place were developed. Meanwhile a theological school, baths and fountains were built to fulfill basic daily needs. With the importation of dead end streets from Ottoman culture, the existing organic town structure was enriched and a communal spirit began to assert itself. The few two-storey houses inhabited by the limited number of wealthy people balanced harmoniously with the more common one-storey houses. St. ...


British rule, 1878-1960

In the British period, the port regained significance. The enlargement of the town outside the city walls in the Ottoman period accelerated. In this period, the Turkish population generally settled in the inner town while the Greek population settled in lower and upper Varosha. In tune with their colonial policies, the British set up an administrative base between the Turkish and Greek quarters rather than following the convention of establishing a base in the inner town. As a result, the enlargement of the town was increasingly centred around the Varosha district. Towards the end of the British period, in parallel with socio-economic developments, and in order to meet the changing needs of the population, new residential districts were built, incorporating new housing, commercial, touristic and recreational areas. Varosha was developed in large part as a tourist resort. Varosha (Turkish: Maraş)(Greek: Βαρώσια) was the modern tourist area of the city of Famagusta prior to the Turkish invasion in 1974. ...


In this period, the town underwent a change reflecting the then current colonial practices. The influence of British architecture was particularly apparent in the form, the details and the materials used. The British, who believed in getting close to communities under their rule by using local materials and details, employed the same practice in Famagusta. The Cyprus Government Railway, with the head offices located in Famagusta, is said to have transformed Famagusta from an old Turkish town into a modern harbour city of the Levant. The Cyprus Government Railway was a railway network that operated in Cyprus from October 1905 to December 1951. ...


The city was also the site for one of the two British internment camps for nearly 50.000 Jewish survivors of the Holocaust trying to emigrate to the British Mandate of Palestine. The other camp was located at Xylophaghou (see Jews in British camps on Cyprus). For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Jews in British camps on Cyprus during the 1940s was a result of the British not allowing Jews to enter the British Mandate of Palestine. ...


After Independence, 1960-1974

From independence in 1960 to the Turkish invasion of 1974, Famagusta flourished both culturally and economically. The town developed toward the south west of Varosha as a tourist center. In the late 1960s Famagusta became one of the world's best-known entertainment and tourist centres. On the one hand there were structures conveying the characteristics of British colonialism, and, on the other hand, buildings reflecting trends in contemporary architecture. These modern buildings were mostly built in Varosha. Architecture in Famagusta in this period thus reflects a desire to merge history and modernism in the pursuit of progress. From its origins as a small port in the seventh century, Famagusta in the 1970s had become a town which now displayed the universal trends of the modern architectural movement. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


The contribution of Famagusta to the country’s economic activity by 1974 far exceeded its proportional dimensions within the country. Apart from possessing over 50% of the total accommodation of Cyprus it also offered the most substantial deep-water port handling (1973) 83% of the total general cargo and 49% of the total passenger traffic to and from the island. Whilst its population was only about 7% of the total of the country, Famagusta by 1974 accounted for over 10% of the total industrial employment and production of Cyprus, concentrating mainly on light industry compatible with its activity as a tourist resort and turning out high quality products ranging from food, beverages and tobacco to clothing, footwear, plastics, small machinery and transport equipment.


As capital of the largest administrative district of the country, the town was the administrative, commercial, service and cultural centre of that district. The district of Famagusta before the 1974 invasion was characterized by a strong and balanced agricultural economy based on citrus fruits, potatoes, tobacco and wheat. Its agricultural success and the good communications between the town and the district ensured a balanced population spread and economic activity, which could be considered as a model for other developing areas.


It was inevitable that the material progress described above would spawn and sustain the most fertile kind of cultural activity in the area, with Famagusta as its hub and centre. Painting, poetry, music and drama were finding expression in innumerable exhibitions, folk art festivals and plays enacted in the nearby-reconstructed ruins of the ancient Greek theatre of Salamis.


There has not been an official census since 1960 but the population of the town in 1974 was estimated to be around 60,000 not counting about 12-15,000 persons commuting daily from the surrounding villages and suburbs to work in Famagusta. This population would swell during the peak summer tourist period to about 90-100,000 with the influx of tourists from numerous European countries, mainly Britain, France, Germany and Scandinavia. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


Since 1974

During the second phase of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus of 14 August 1974 (referred to by Turks as the Cyprus Peace Operation), the Mesaoria plain was overrun by Turkish tanks and in two days the Turkish Army was in Famagusta. The town had been completely evacuated by its Greek population who fled before the invading army and after the town had been bombed by the Turkish air force. Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Mesaoria is a broad, sweeping plain which makes up the center of the island of Cyprus. ... The Turkish Army (Turkish: Türk Kara Kuvvetleri) is a branch of the Turkish Armed Forces. ...

Varosha viewed from Palm Beach Hotel [photo: RP 2005].
Varosha viewed from Palm Beach Hotel [photo: RP 2005].
Varosha area in 2006
Varosha area in 2006

Unlike other parts of Turkish-controlled Cyprus, the Varosha section of Famagusta was sealed off by the Turkish army immediately after being captured and remains in that state today. The Greek Cypriots who had fled from Varosha were not allowed to return, and journalists are banned. It has been frozen in time with department stores still full of clothes, now many years out of fashion, and hotels empty but still fully equipped. Swedish journalist Jan-Olof Bengtsson, who visited the Swedish UN battalion in Famagusta port and saw the sealed-off part of the town from the battalion’s observation post, called the area a 'ghost town'. He wrote in Kvällsposten on September 24, 1977), Image File history File links Download high resolution version (908x427, 126 KB)photographed by Rolf Palmberg Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (908x427, 126 KB)photographed by Rolf Palmberg Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...

"The asphalt on the roads has cracked in the warm sun and along the sidewalks bushes are growing [...] Today, September 1977, the breakfast tables are still set, the laundry still hanging and the lamps still burning [...] Famagusta is a ghost-town."

Turkish Cypriots continue to live north of Varosha, especially in the walled city. These sections of Famagusta remain vibrant with many fascinating buildings. The city is also home to the Eastern Mediterranean University. Turkish Cypriots are those inhabitants of Cyprus who are ethnically Turkish[1], as opposed to those who are of Greek (the Greek Cypriots) or other ethnicities. ... The Eastern Mediterranean University (Turkish: DoÄŸu Akdeniz Ãœniversitesi) is located in the northern part of Cyprus in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. ...


The current mayor-in-exile of Famagusta is Alexis Galanos. Oktay Kaylap heads the Turkish-controlled municipal administration. There have been suggestions from the Cypriot Government to transfer Varosha to UN administration, allow the return of the refugees, and open the harbour for use by both communities. However, the Turkish Cypriot side and Turkey rejected them. Varosha would have returned to Greek Cypriot control as part of the Annan Plan for Cyprus had the plan not been rejected by Greek Cypriot voters. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The population of the city before 1974 was 39,000. Of this number, 26,500 were Greek Cypriots, 8,500 Turkish Cypriots and 4,000 from other ethnic groups. After the invasion, in 1975, the population was 8,500, all of them Turks. Today the population that lives in the town is 39,000. The number does not include the Greek Cypriot legal inhabitants but the Turkish Cypriots and settlers who live there.


The town also played host to the football clubs Anorthosis, which has many trophies in Cyprus, and Nea Salamina Famagusta. Both teams used until 1974 the stadium of the town, the GSE Stadium (Gymnastic Club Evagoras Stadium) but after the abandonment of the city the teams moved to the town of Larnaca. Both teams have also volleyball sections, which they are the best teams in Cyprus. Anorthosis has the most trophies in volleyball. Salamina also was until 2003 the concecutive champion of Cyprus for more than 5 years. Soccer redirects here. ... Anorthosis Famagusta FC (Greek: Ανόρθωση Αμμοχώστου = Anorthosi Ammochostou) is a Cypriot football and volleyball club which was originally based in Famagusta, but is now based temporarily in Larnaca. ... Nea Salamis Famagusta or Nea Salamina (Greek: Νέα Σαλαμίνα Αμμοχώστου) is a Cypriot football club which comes from Famagusta. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ...


Dr. Derviş Eroğlu, a Turkish Cypriot politician and George Vasiliou, former President of Cyprus are from Famagusta. Derviş Zaim, a Cypriot filmmaker, whose first novel won the prestigious "Yunus Nadi" literary prize in Turkey, is also from the Famagusta. Also Chris Achilleos, a famous British Cypriot painter and illustrator was born there. Image:Eroglu. ... George Vasos Vasiliou (Greek: Γιώργος Βασιλείου) (born 1931) was President of the Republic of Cyprus 1988-93. ... The President of Cyprus is the head of state and the head of government of the Republic of Cyprus. ... DerviÅŸ Zaim (born 1964 in Famagusta, Cyprus) is a Turkish Cypriot novelist and filmmaker. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Chris Achilleos (born 1947) is a painter and illustrator . ...

Famagusta in 2002. Cranes remain where they were in 1974.
Famagusta in 2002. Cranes remain where they were in 1974.

Due to its relative isolation and neglect over the past 30 years despite being such a historically and culturally significant city, Famagusta was listed on the World Monuments Fund's 2008 Watch List of the 100 Most Endangered Sites in the world. St. ... St. ... The World Monuments Fund (WMF) is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of historic art and architecture worldwide through fieldwork, advocacy, grantmaking, education, and training. ...


Sites of interest

Famagusta contains spectacular ruins, including a magnificent amphitheatre, Roman baths, a gymnasium and royal tombs. The mosaics are particularly beautiful. Just inland from Famagusta are the church and monastery dedicated to St. Barnabas, the founder of the apostolic Cypriot Orthodox Church in 45 AD. Barnabas a Cypriot from Salamis who visited the island accompanied by St. Paul and St. Mark and was later martyred in Salamis in 52 AD. The church of St. Barnabas is preserved exactly as it was since abandoned in 1976. There is a collection of 18th century icons and the monastery cloisters now houses an archaeological museum. Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... The ancient Church of Cyprus is one of the fourteen or fifteen independent (autocephalous) Eastern Orthodox churches, which are in communion and in doctrinal agreement with one another but not all subject to one patriarch. ... This article is about the year 45. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Mark the Evangelist (מרקוס, Greek: Μάρκος) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark and a companion of Peter. ... This article is about the year 52. ...


Famagusta harbour is dominated by a great citadel sometimes known as Othello's Tower in reference to the (fictional) play by Shakespeare. It contains a splendid 14th century Gothic Hall. For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... Shakespeare redirects here. ...


The Venetian Palace was used, after its destruction in 1571, during the Ottoman Empire as a prison, and among the prisoners was Namik Kemal, the National poet of the Ottoman Empire, who was held there between 1873 and 1876, after having been exiled to Cyprus by the Sultan. Namik Kemal (December 2, 1840 - December 2, 1888) was a Turkish nationalist poet, translator, journalist, and social reformer. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ...


Sister Cities

  • İzmir (Turkey), since 1994 (To Famagusta as a city in the TRNC)

Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Ä°zmir, historically Smyrna, is the third most populous city of Turkey and the countrys largest port after Ä°stanbul. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Famagusta

Salamis was an ancient city-state on the east coast of Cyprus, at the mouth of the river Pedieos, 6 km North of Famagusta. ... Famagusta District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Ghost town (disambiguation). ... The United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) was established in 1964 to prevent a recurrence of fighting between the Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots. ...

References

Sources consulted
  • Cyprus.gov.cy (online). Republic of Cyprus government website.
  • Enlart, Camille (1899). L'art gothique et la Renaissance a Chypre. Paris, pp. 251–255.
  • Kyprianos (1788). History of Cyprus. Venice, p. 453
  • Magusa.org (English). Official website of Famagusta.
  • Smith, William (1854). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography. s.v. Arsinoe
Endnotes
  1. ^ Magusa.org, op.cit., "Table-1: Population of Famagusta", as of April 2006

Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, published in 1854, was the last a series of classical dictionaries edited by the english scholar William Smith (1813–1893), which included as sister works the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. ... To suggest a relevant news story for the main page, refer to the criteria then add your suggestion at the candidates page. ...

External links

  • Official Website of displaced Famagusta Municipality
  • Official Website of Famagusta de facto Turkish Municipality
  • Guide to The City of Famagusta
  • Official Website of Anorthosis Famagusta F.C.

Coordinates: 35°07′N, 33°57′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Kyrenia District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Karavas harbor with Acheropiitos Greek Orthodox Monastery Karavas (Greek: Καραβάς; Turkish: Alsancak) is the sister village of Lapithos in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lapithos (Greek: Λάπηθος; Turkish: Lapta) is a town of Kyrenia District on the northern coast of Cyprus, which was a kingdom in ancienty. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Famagusta (Mağusa), Cyprus  -  cypnet.co.uk (603 words)
The city of Famagusta (Mağusa in Turkish) is one of the finest examples of mediaeval architecture in the eastern Mediterranean and, in its present state of preservation, is equal to that of the old cities of Carcassone and Ragusa (Dubrovnik).
Famagusta prospered through the destruction of the neighbouring Salamis, the former capital of the island.
Famagusta was the seat of a Latin diocese from the twelfth century and had residential bishops till the end of the sixteenth.
The City of Famagusta, Cyprus (383 words)
The city of Famagusta is one of the finest examples of mediaeval architecture in the eastern Mediterranean and, in its present state of preservation, is equal to that of the old cities of Carcassone and Ragusa (Dubrovnik).
Much of the history of the town is obscure as there are no written records and our only source of material is from travellers' accounts of merchants passing through.
Famagusta of today is a vibrant youthful university city.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m