FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fallopian tube
Fallopian tube
Schematic frontal view of female anatomy
Vessels of the uterus and its appendages, rear view. (Fallopian tubes visible at top right and top left.)
Latin tuba uterina
Gray's subject #267 1257
Artery ovarian artery, uterine artery
Lymph lumbar lymph nodes
Precursor Müllerian duct
MeSH Fallopian+Tubes
Dorlands/Elsevier t_21/12827008

The Fallopian tubes, also known as oviducts, uterine tubes, and salpinges (singular salpinx) are two very fine tubes leading from the ovaries of female mammals into the uterus. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Gray589. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Section of an artery For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ... In human anatomy, the ovarian artery is a blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the ovary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In mammals including humans, the lymphatic vessels (or lymphatics) are a network of thin tubes that branch, like blood vessels, into tissues throughout the body. ... The lumbar lymph nodes are a group of lymph nodes residing in the lumbar region. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Müllerian ducts are paired ducts of the embryo which empty into the cloaca, and which in the female develop into the upper vagina, cervix, uterus and oviducts; in the male they disappear except for the vestigial vagina masculina and the appendix testis. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Elseviers logo. ... Human female internal reproductive anatomy Ovaries are a part of a female organism that produces eggs. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in female mammary glands and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in... This article is about female reproductive anatomy. ...

Contents

Anatomy

There are two Fallopian tubes,attached to either side of the cornual end of the uterus, and each terminating at or near one ovary forming a structure called the fimbria. Uterus and uterine tubes In the female reproductive system, the fimbria is a fringe of tissue near the ovary leading to the Fallopian tube. ...


The Fallopian tubes are not directly attached to the ovaries, but open into the peritoneal cavity (essentially the inside of the abdomen); they thus form a direct communication between the peritoneal cavity and the outside via the vagina. In higher vertebrates, the peritoneum is the serous membrane that forms the lining of the abdominal cavity - it covers most of the intra-abdominal organs. ...


In humans, the Fallopian tubes are about 7–14 cm long. This article is about modern humans. ...


Regions

There are four regions of the fallopian tube from the ovary to the uterus:[1]

The third part of the uterine tube is the the infundibulum. ... Uterus and uterine tubes In the female reproductive system, the fimbria is a fringe of tissue near the ovary leading to the Fallopian tube. ... The ampulla is the second portion of the uterine tube. ... The first part of the uterine tube is the isthmus tubae uterinae. ...

Histology

Layers of the wall of the fallopian tube.

There are three layers of the fallopian tube:[2] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ...

  • Mucosa - the distinctive folds of the mucosa are the most unusual feature. The folds contain ciliated cells and "peg cells".[3][4] The region of the fallopian tube can be approximated by looking at the mucosa, because the folds are most elaborate at the ampulla and almost nonexistent at the intramural portion.
  • Muscularis externa
  • Serosa

The mucous membranes (or mucosa) are linings of ectodermic origin, covered in epithelium, that line various body cavities and internal organs. ... cross-section of two cilia, showing 9+2 structure A cilium (plural cilia) is a fine projection from a eukaryotic cell that constantly beats in one direction. ... The muscular coat (or muscular layer, or muscular fibers, or muscularis externa) is a region of smooth muscle in many organs in the vertebrate body, adjacent to the mucous membrane. ... A serosa is a serous membrane, Serous membranes line the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities, enclosing their contents. ...

Motility

The Fallopian tubes are mobile, and have been observed on time-lapse videography moving about the pelvis. The flower of a geranium opening over a period of about two hours. ...


Although anatomical illustrations have them proceeding from the uterine horns to the ovary, this is not the case for most of the menstrual cycle, and a tube may cross to the other side or lie on top of the uterus. The uterine horns are the points where the the uterus and the uterine tubes meet. ... Menstrual cycle The menstrual cycle is a recurring cycle of physiological changes that occurs in the females of human beings and other great apes. ...


Function in fertilization

When an ovum is developing in an ovary, it is encapsulated in a sac known as an ovarian follicle. A human ovum Sperm cells attempting to fertilize an ovum An ovum (plural ova) is a haploid female reproductive cell or gamete. ... Ovarian follicles or Graafian follicles (after Regnier de Graaf) are the roughly spherical cell aggregations in the ovary containing an ovum and from which the egg is released during ovulation. ...


On maturity of the ovum, the follicle and the ovary's wall rupture, allowing the ovum to escape and enter the Fallopian tube. There it travels toward the uterus, pushed along by movements of cilia on the inner lining of the tubes. This trip takes hours or days. If the ovum is fertilized while in the Fallopian tube, then it normally implants in the endometrium when it reaches the uterus, which signals the beginning of pregnancy. This article is about female reproductive anatomy. ... cross-section of two cilia, showing 9+2 structure A cilium (plural cilia) is a fine projection from a eukaryotic cell that constantly beats in one direction. ... A sperm cell fertilizing an ovum This article is about reproduction in organisms. ... The endometrium is the inner membrane of the mammalian uterus. ... A pregnant woman near the end of her term Pregnancy is the carrying of one or more offspring in an embryonal or fetal stage of development by female mammals, including humans, inside their bodies, between the stages of conception and birth. ...


Occasionally the embryo implants into the Fallopian tube instead of the uterus, creating an ectopic pregnancy, commonly known as a "tubal pregnancy". This article is about female reproductive anatomy. ...


Embryology and homology

The Fallopian tubes are not homologous to the vas deferens or any other structure in males. In biology, homology is any similarity between structures that is due to their shared ancestry. ... The vas deferens (plural: vasa deferentia), also called ductus deferens, (Latin: carrying-away vessel) is part of the male anatomy of some species, including humans. ...


Embryos have two pairs of ducts to let gametes out of the body; one pair (the Müllerian ducts) develops in females into the Fallopian tubes, uterus and vagina, while the other pair (the Wolffian ducts) develops in males into the epididymis and vas deferens. For other uses, see Embryo (disambiguation). ... A gamete is a specialized germ cell that fuses with another gamete during fertilization (conception) in organisms that reproduce sexually. ... The Müllerian ducts are paired ducts of the embryo which empty into the cloaca, and which in the female develop into the upper vagina, cervix, uterus and oviducts; in the male they disappear except for the vestigial vagina masculina and the appendix testis. ... The vagina, (from Latin, literally sheath or scabbard ) is the tubular tract leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental mammals and marsupials, or to the cloaca in female birds, monotremes, and some reptiles. ... The Wolffian duct (also known as archinephric duct, Leydigs duct, mesonephric duct, or nephric duct) is a paired organ found in mammals including humans during embryogenesis. ... Male Anatomy The epididymis is part of the human male reproductive system and is present in all male mammals. ...


Normally, only one of the pair of tubes will develop while the other regresses and disappears in utero.


Pathology

Pelvic inflammatory disease can strike the fallopian tubes. This might cause a fallopian tube obstruction. Pelvic inflammatory disease (or disorder) (PID) is a generic term for infection of the female uterus, fallopian tubes, and/or ovaries as it progresses to scar formation with adhesions to nearby tissues and organs. ... Fallopian tube obstruction is a cause of female tubal infertility. ...


Surgery

The surgical removal of a Fallopian tube is called a salpingectomy. To remove both sides is a bilateral salpingectomy. An operation that combines the removal of a Fallopian tube with removal of at least one ovary is a salpingo-oophorectomy. An operation to restore a fallopian tube obstruction is called a tuboplasty. Salpingectomy refers to the surgical removal of a Fallopian tube. ... Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of the ovaries of a female animal. ... A tuboplasty is a surgical operation to correct an obstruction or adhesion of a fallopian tube to achieve a pregnancy in women with tubal infertility. ...


Etymology and nomenclature

They are named after their discoverer, the 16th century Italian anatomist, Gabriele Falloppio. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Gabriele Falloppio Gabriele Falloppio (1523- October 9, 1562), often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century; he was born at Modena, Italy in 1523; he died October 9, 1562 at Padua. ...


Though the name 'Fallopian tube' is eponymous, some texts spell it with a lower case 'f' owing to the theory that the adjective 'fallopian' has been absorbed into modern English as the de facto name for the structure.


The Greek word salpinx (σαλπιγξ) means "trumpet". The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the French horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium, and tuba. ...


Additional images

See also

Pelvic inflammatory disease (or disorder) (PID) is a generic term for infection of the female uterus, fallopian tubes, and/or ovaries as it progresses to scar formation with adhesions to nearby tissues and organs. ... Menstrual cycle The menstrual cycle is a recurring cycle of physiological changes that occurs in the females of human beings and other great apes. ...

References

  1. ^ SUNY Labs 43:04-0101 - "The Female Pelvis: The Oviduct"
  2. ^ Histology at USC rep/c_27
  3. ^ Histology at USC rep/c_31
  4. ^ http://www3.umdnj.edu/histsweb/lab17/lab17oviduct.html

The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fallopian Tube (4541 words)
The Fallopian tubes develop from the cranial parts of the paramesonephric ducts, with their cranial ends remaining open connecting the duct with the coelomic (peritoneal) cavity and the caudal end communicating with the uterine cornua.
The Fallopian tubes are paired, tubular, seromuscular organs whose course runs medially from the cornua of the uterus toward the ovary laterally.
The serosa of the tube is composed of an epithelial layer histologically indistinguishable from peritoneum elsewhere in the abdominal cavity.
Fallopian tube - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (384 words)
The Fallopian tubes, also known as oviducts and uterine tubes, are two very fine tubes leading from the ovaries of female mammals into the uterus.
There are two Fallopian tubes, attached to either side of the cranial end of the uterus, and each terminating at or near one ovary.
The Fallopian tubes are not directly attached to the ovaries, but open into the peritonial cavity (essentially the inside of the abdomen); they thus form a direct communication between the peritoneal cavity and the outside via the vagina.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m