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Encyclopedia > Fallen angel
Statue of the Fallen Angel, Retiro Park (Madrid, Spain).
Statue of the Fallen Angel, Retiro Park (Madrid, Spain).

In some Christian doctrines, a fallen angel is an angel that has been exiled or banished from Heaven. Often such banishment is a punishment for disobeying or rebelling against God. The best-known fallen angel is Lucifer. Lucifer rebelled and was cast out of Heaven and fell to Earth for his offense. According to some traditions, fallen angels will roam the Earth until Judgment Day, when they will be banished to Hell. A fallen angel is an angel that has been exiled or banished from Heaven. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2345x3519, 5830 KB) The sculpture of Fallen Angel in Parque del Buen Retiro at Plaza del Angel Caido of Madrid, created 1877 cast in bronze for Universal Exposition in Paris. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2345x3519, 5830 KB) The sculpture of Fallen Angel in Parque del Buen Retiro at Plaza del Angel Caido of Madrid, created 1877 cast in bronze for Universal Exposition in Paris. ... Afonso XII Mausoleum Palacio de Cristal The Parque del Buen Retiro (Park of the Pleasant Retreat) is a large and popular, 1. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about the star or fallen angel. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Judgment Day redirects here. ... This article is about the theological or philosophical afterlife. ...

Contents

Origin of the term

The origin of the term lies in the Hebrew word for "giant". The Hebrew word translated as "giants" here is nephilim, a plural, which itself derives from the root word Naphal, which means to fall. The apocryphal Book of Enoch explains that a group of rebellious angels "left their first estate" (heaven, or the sky) and came down (fell) to Earth to marry human women and have children with them. Jude makes mention of these angels in the New Testament: For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Matrimony redirects here. ...

Jude 1:6 And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day.

Due to the disastrous results of this forbidden intermingling, many have come to view the word "fallen" as denoting a fall from grace[citation needed], though it seems that the original meaning was simply to descend from the heavens.


The distinction of good and bad angels constantly appears in the Bible, but it is instructive to note that there is no sign of any dualism or conflict between two equal principles, one good and the other evil. The conflict depicted is rather that waged on earth between the Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of the Evil One, but the latter's inferiority is always supposed. The existence, then, of this inferior, and therefore created, spirit, has to be explained. Bouguereaus LInnocence (Innocence). Both the child and the lamb represent fragility and peacefulness, as seen in religious art. ... For other uses, see Dualism (disambiguation). ... Kingdom of Heaven redirects here. ...


The gradual development of Hebrew language consciousness on this point is very clearly marked in the inspired writings. The account of the fall of the First Parents (Genesis 3) is couched in such terms that it is difficult to see in it anything more than the acknowledgment of the existence of a principle of evil who was jealous of the human race. Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ...


The statement (Genesis 6:1) that the "Sons of God" married the daughters of men is explained of the fall of the angels, in Enoch 6-9, and codices, D, E F, and A of the Septuagint read frequently, for "sons of God", oi aggeloi tou theou. Unfortunately, codices B and C are defective in Ge., vi, but it is probably that they, too, read oi aggeloi in this passage, for they constantly so render the expression "sons of God"; cf. Job 1:6, 2:1, 38:7; but on the other hand, see Psalms 2:1; 85; & (Septuagint). Philo, in commenting on the passage in his treatise "Quod Deus sit immutabilis", i, follows the Septuagint. For Philo's doctrine of Angels, cf. "De Vita Mosis", iii, 2, "De Somniis", VI: "De Incorrupta Manna", i; "De Sacrificis", ii; "De Lege Allegorica", I, 12; III, 73; and for the view of Genesis 6:1, cf. St. Justin, Apol., ii 5. There are several theories concerning the identity of the sons of God (bnei elohim, בני האלהים, contrasted with daughters of men) identified in the book of Genesis. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), known also as Philo of Alexandria and as Philo Judaeus And as Yedidia, was a Hellenized Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria, Egypt. ...


Job 1-2

The picture afforded us in Job 1-2 is equally imaginative; but Satan, perhaps the earliest individualization of the fallen Angel, is presented as an intruder who is jealous of Job. He can be seen as clearly an inferior being to the Deity and can only touch Job with God's permission, or as the ultimate embodiment of pride, as per his believed characteristics, trying to prove God's summation of Job's character and faith is flawed. By playing within the limitations God Himself has set Satan affords himself the opprotunity to cause Job to curse the Lord and there-by, in affect, prove God wrong in order to prove himself to be correct, and therefore superior to God. How theologic thought advanced as the sum of revelation grew appears from a comparison of II Kings 24:1, with I Paral., xxi, 1.


Whereas in the former passage David's sin was said to be due to "the wrath of the Lord" which "stirred up David", in the latter we read that "Satan moved David to number Israel". In Job. iv, 18, we seem to find a definite declaration of the fall: "In His angels He found wickedness." The Septuagint of Job contains some instructive passages regarding avenging angels in whom we are perhaps to see fallen spirits, thus xxxiii, 23: "If a thousand death-dealing angels should be (against him) not one of them shall wound him"; and xxxvi, 14: "If their souls should perish in their youth (through rashness) yet their life shall be wounded by the angels"; and xxi, 15: "The riches unjustly accumulated shall be vomited up, an angel shall drag him out of his house;" cf. Prov., xvii, 11; Ps., xxxiv, 5, 6; lxxvii, 49, and especially, Ecclesiasticus, xxxix, 33, a text which, as far as can be gathered from the present state of the manuscript, was in the Hebrew original. This article is about the Mormon group. ...


In some of these passages, it is true, the angels may be regarded as avengers of God's justice without therefore being evil spirits. In Zach., iii, 1-3, Satan is called the adversary who pleads before the Lord against Jesus the High Priest. Isaias, xiv, and Ezech., xxviii, are for the Fathers the loci classici regarding the fall of Satan (cf. Tertull., adv. Marc., II, x); and Jesus Himself has given colour to this view by using the imagery of the latter passage when saying to His Apostles: "I saw Satan like lightning falling from heaven" (Luke 10:18).


New Testament

In New Testament times, the idea of the two spiritual kingdoms is clearly established. The devil is a fallen angel who in his fall has drawn multitudes of the heavenly host in his train. Jesus terms him "the Prince of this world" (John xiv, 30); he is the tempter of the human race and tries to involve them in his fall (Matthew 25:41; 2 Peter 2:4; Ephesians 6:12; 2 Corinthians 11:14; 12:7). Christian imagery of the devil as the dragon is mainly derived from the Apocalypse (ix, 11-15; xii, 7-9), where he is termed "the dragon", "the old serpent", etc., and is represented as having actually been in combat with Archangel Michael. Also, an image is given him as a "roaring lion seeking whom he may devour (as seen in II Peter)" gives context, and subtance of his role as the tempter of the inhabitants of the earth. The similarity between scenes such as these and the early Babylonian accounts of the struggle between Merodach and the dragon Tiamat is very striking. Whether we are to trace its origin to vague reminiscences of the mighty saurians which once people the earth is a moot question, but the curious reader may consult Bousett, "The Anti-Christ Legend" (tr. by Keane, London, 1896). The translator has prefixed to it an interesting discussion on the origin of the Babylonian Dragon-Myth. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Second Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament of the Bible. ... The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... In Christian eschatology, the Antichrist or anti-Christ means a person, office, or group recognized as fulfilling the Biblical prophecies about one who will oppose Christ and substitute himself in Christs place. ...


Reasons for their fall

There are a number of different beliefs regarding the origins and motivations of fallen angels. Many focus on issues of free will, lust, pride, or the incomprehensibility of the acts of God. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (626x710, 147 KB)Satan, as drawn by Gustave Dore, in John Miltons Paradise Lost The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (626x710, 147 KB)Satan, as drawn by Gustave Dore, in John Miltons Paradise Lost The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Believe. ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... A demon sating his lust in a 13th century manuscript Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification and excitement. ... This article is about the emotion. ...


Consequences of free will

It is generally accepted by most Christians that the fallen angels were cast out of Heaven because of actions taken against God.[citation needed] These actions were enabled because the angels were granted free will. Generally, these actions included active rebellion, doubt in God's motives or plans, or a rejection of the system of Heaven. Pride is often involved, especially in cases where an angel believed itself to hold more authority than God. (Lucifer being the prime example among these). Free Will in Theology is an important part of the debate on free will in general. ... This article is about the emotion. ...


Origen

Origen, a father of the early Christian Church, believed that God had created all angels to be equal and free. However, in possessing the power of free will, some of them began to move further away from God of their own volition. Origen Origen (Greek: Ōrigénēs, 185–ca. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Arminius · Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box...


Origen states metaphorically that, although some angels fell and became human or demonic, all hope is not lost. He theorizes that by practicing virtue, men and demons can again become angels. While considered an early Father of the Church, Origen was deemed a heretic as a result of some of his writings and teachings, which did not conform to accepted scripture or tradition. Mainly, his concept of Apocatastasis, the belief that all beings (human beings, fallen angels, demons, and Satan) will return to God through God's love and mercy, was deemed unacceptable at that time. His excommunication was posthumously reversed. This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... “Fiend” redirects here. ... The Church Fathers or Fathers of the Church are the early and influential theologians and writers in the Christian church, particularly those of the first five centuries of Christian history. ... Ancient of Days by William Blake Apocatastasis (a-po-ca-TAH-sta-sis) is a Greek word meaning: 1) reconstitution or restitution [1] 2) restoration to the original or primordial condition [2] // [edit] Apocatastasis [edit] in Stoicism In Stoic philosophy, the cosmos is a physical expression of Zeus perfect thoughts...


Lust

The following comes from a series of ancient texts referenced in the Bible called "The Three Books of Enoch", a set of books found in the Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Non-canonical books referenced in the Bible. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... Pseudepigrapha (from the Greek words pseudos = lie and epigrapho = write) is a text or a number of texts whose claimed authorship or authenticity is incorrect. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism...


According to these books, it is because of lust that some angels fell from Heaven. God asked the "Watchers" (Grigori), a select group of angels, to assist the Archangels in the creation of Eden. Those Grigori who descended to Earth saw the daughters of men and became enchanted with them. Consequently, the Grigori began to reveal to man some of the secrets of Heaven, such as astrology and the vanity of enhancing the face and body with perfumes and cosmetics. The Grigori then fell in love with human women. According to the text, some of the Grigori even took wives and created offspring, giants known as the Nephilim. This made God so angry that he cursed those Grigori who had betrayed Him, threw them out of Heaven, made them mortal and transformed them into demons. God sent the Great Flood to cleanse the Earth of the wanton killing and destruction perpetrated by the Nephilim. Notable angels who fell in this account are Semyazza, Samael, Azazel, and Lucifer. For other uses, see Grigori (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... For other uses, see Vanity (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ... This article is about great floods. ... According to The Three Books of Enoch, a set of books that are non-canonical, Semyazza was a Watcher. ... This article is about the archangel. ... For other uses, see Azazel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the star or fallen angel. ...


Pride

This belief involves Lucifer's revolution against God, well known amongst Christians. Pride, the gravest of the seven deadly sins, eventually led to the expulsion from Heaven of certain beings, up to and including the highest orders of angels. Lucifer, who himself succumbed to pride, was the first and mightiest angel to be created. With intelligence, radiance, beauty, and power unmatched among all of the angels in Heaven, Lucifer was second in majesty only to God Himself. This article is about the star or fallen angel. ... Combatants Rebel angels Loyalist angels Commanders Lucifer Michael the Archangel Strength 133,306,668 (disputed) 266,613,336(disputed) Casualties uncertain uncertain A facet of Christian mythology, the War in Heaven was a defining moment in the universe, when the cherub angel Lucifer led a third of the Angels in... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation) and Seven deadly sins (disambiguation). ...


Unfortunately, Lucifer became ambitious and self-centered, eventually deciding to prove his power by raising his throne to the height of God's throne. Other angels did not approve of Lucifer's plan; they did not want a lower being trying symbolically to become the equal of God. When Lucifer enacted his scheme, he was instantly hurled out of Heaven. This account of the rebellion might have come from several ancient Canaanite manuscripts that deal with Shahar, one of their own deities[citation needed]. Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... Christ Pantocrator seated in a capital U in an illuminated manuscript from the Badische Landesbibliothek, Germany. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... See also: List of deities Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Catholic theologians have speculated that the incarnation of Christ was revealed to the angels. The idea that all of Heaven must bow before Christ, formed in part from the lesser nature of humanity, motivated the prideful actions of Lucifer (cf. Suarez, De Angelis, lib. VII, xiii). Icon of Christ in a Greek Orthodox church This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ...


According to the Book of Enoch, Johnalyn was known as the prettiest of God's angels that did not betray Him. She became most well known for the inspiration of Eve. As God made Adam in his own image God made Eve in the image of Johnalyn.


Modern Catholic view

According to the Catecism of the Catholic Church, Angels were all created good but some turned bad on their own. Angels don't need faith as they already have the knowledge of celestial things. Due to their angelic nature, repentance is not possible and their sins are irreversible.


Venerable Sor María de Jesús de Agreda (1602-1665+), expressed in a book titled "La Mistica Ciudad de Dios" what is the modern common Catholic interpretation. In the beginning of times, when God separated daylight from darkness, He also separated the good from the bad in the Heavens: God revealed his Trinitary nature to the Angels, He also showed them He would incarnate and all the Angels were to revere and adore Him as God and human.


Lucifer was the first angel to rebel against God (Isaiah 14) and with him he took one third of the the celestial host. Lucifer was the most beautiful angel, so beautiful indeed that he envied God and wanted to receive all His praises: he didn't accept the idea of bowing before Jesus and hated being inferior to any human, including His Holy Mother. As a punishment God didn't remove the powers from the Devil but decided to punish and humiliate him by stating that through His Holy Mother, which he failed to respect and praise, his head would be crushed and he would be defeated and anihilated.


Then came the battle related by Saint John (Apoc. 12) between St. Michael the Archangel and His Angels, and Lucifer and his angels.


Bowing to mankind

According to the Quran, when God created man, He wanted his angels and Lucifer to acknowledge man by bowing down to him, but Lucifer did not obey his mandate. Islam does not hold Lucifer to be a fallen angel because it maintains that Lucifer is one among many of Allah's creations, and that Iblis is made out of fire as are the Jinn. These Jinns are divided into two groups, one being that which follows the Islamic teachings, the other which follows Lucifer. Look up Mankind in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Genie is the anglicized word for the Arabic jinni. In Semitic mythology and Islamic religion, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of spirits. ...

We created you and then formed you and then We said to the Angels, "Prostrate before Adam" and they prostrated except for Iblis. He was not among those who prostrated. God said, "What prevented you from prostrating when I commanded you?" He (iblis) replied, "I am better than him. You created me from fire and You created him from clay". God said, "Descend from heaven. It is not for you to be arrogant in it. So get out! You are one of the abased."
Surah 7 (al-A`raf), 11-13

A later mention of this idea can be found in "Vita Adae et Evae", an apocryphal text which most scholars agree was written somewhere near the end of the 10th century AD. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word , meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...

XIII: The devil replied, 'Adam, what dost thou tell me? It is for thy sake that I have been hurled from that place. When thou wast formed, I was hurled out of the presence of God and banished from the company of the angels. When God blew into thee the breath of life and thy face and likeness was made in the image of God, Michael also brought thee and made (us) worship thee in the sight of God; and God the Lord spake: Here is Adam. I have made thee in our image and likeness.'
XIV: And Michael went out and called all the angels saying: 'Worship the image of God as the Lord God hath commanded.' And Michael himself worshipped first; then he called me and said: 'Worship the image of God the Lord.' And I answered, 'I have no (need) to worship Adam.' And since Michael kept urging me to worship, I said to him, 'Why dost thou urge me? I will not worship an inferior and younger being. I am his senior in the Creation, before he was made was I already made. It is his duty to worship me.'
XV: When the angels who were under me heard this, they refused to worship him. And Michael saith, 'Worship the image of God, but if thou wilt not worship him, the Lord God will be wroth with thee.' And I said, 'If He be wroth with me, I will set my seat above the stars of heaven and will be like the Highest.'
Anon. Vita Adae et Evae, 13–15. [1]

Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ...

Disobedience to God as per the Quran (continuation to the above heading)

According to the islamic version of the story that states that Lucifer was the angel who loved God the most in fact he was the leader of angels. At the time of the angels' creation, God told them to bow to no one but Him. Islam (Arabic: ; ( ▶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ...


However, God created mankind the first being Adam (Adam), whom he considered superior to the angels, and commanded the angels to bow before the new figure. Lucifer refused, because he considered himself superior to man. By the Quran it is said that Allah ordered the angels to make a body of clay and when it was complete he breathed life into the it.Then he commanded the angels to bow to Adam (Adam)but Lucifer (ibliis) refused and retorted to Allah that "i have made this human by my hands and he is of clay and i of fire then why should i bow to him ?". This disobedience enraged Allah and Lucifer was out casted from heaven and he was mishapen and made hideous. The Shiites interpretation of the matter is very similar to that of the Sunni's however there is one difference in which Shiites state that the reason God ordered the angels and iblis to bow down to Adam lies within his offspring. Adam was to hold the purity of the Prophet Mohammad and Ahli Bayteh (his family), which Shi'ites believe are God's greatest creation. Lucifer however disobeyed God's commands and asked Allah to give him the power and chance to deceive man to prove to Allah that man can be deceived and be unfaithful and follow the path of gods they create themselves or change the code provided be Allah. So in this way Lucifer first planted the seed of doubt in Adams heart and made Adam eat a forbidden fruit. It was then that Allah created the universe and sent Adam to earth for by disobeying Allah he had forfeited his right to reside in heaven and since then man has been deceived by Lucifer into creating other gods or changing and misshaping the code of life sent by allah through his prophets ( main are Moosa (moses) whose teachings were misshapen and Jews were born , Eisa (Jesus) whose teaching were in the form of the book called as ingeel (pronounced as In-Jee-l) which was misshapen and changed by the church to give birth to the monopolized religion of Christianity , and finally there was Mohammad (may peace be upon him) who was the last prophet sent by Allah to bring human on the right path of Islam and it was through him that Quran was sent down earth by Allah through the Arc angel Gabriel(gibraeel - pronounced as JIB-RAA-EEl), in parts called as WAHI's, who used to come down to earth and teach the Quran by heart to Mohammad(may peace be upon him) who in turn had it written down by those who could read and write as he himself was uneducated and could not read and write. For other uses, see Adam (disambiguation). ...


Fallen angels by rank

Some of the fallen were supposedly members of more than one rank, but this list will only list the primary rank, or the rank that is most well-known, of each apostate angel. For more information, see the articles of the various entities.


First Sphere

Seraphim Cherubim Thrones

六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ... It has been suggested that Ophan be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the star or fallen angel. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the biblical creature. ... A woodcarving of Belial and some of his followers from Jacobus de Teramos book Buche Belial (1473) Belial (also Belhor, Baalial, Beliar, Belias , Beliall, Beliel; from Hebrew בְּלִיַּ֫עַל ; also named Matanbuchus, Mechembuchus, Meterbuchus in older scripts) is an evil being in Jewish apocrypha, and also a term used to characterise... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... For other uses, see Azazel (disambiguation). ... Belzebub redirects here. ... In demonology Berith is a Great Duke of Hell, powerful and terrible, and has twenty-six legions of demons under his command. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In demonology, Focalor is a powerful Great Duke of Hell, commanding three legions of demons (thirty legions to other authors). ... In demonology, Forneus is a Great Marquis of Hell, and has twenty-nine legions of demons under his rule. ... In Christian demonic mythology, Gressil is the demon of impurity and uncleanliness. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Seal of Murmur according to the Ars Goetia. ... An angel belonging to the order of Thrones and one of the 72 angels bearing the name of God Shemhamphorae. ... In demonology, Phenex is a Great Marquis of Hell and has twenty legions of demons under his command. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sonneillon is the Demon of Hate, and he tempts men with hatred against their enemies. ... In Christian demonic mythology, Verrine is the demon of impatience. ...

Second Sphere

Dominions Virtues Powers

According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... In demonology Balam is a great and powerful King (to some authors a Duke) of Hell, a terrible one, commanding over forty legions of demons. ... In demonology Marchosias is powerful Great Marquis of Hell, commanding thirty legions of demons. ... Nilaihah Records is an American independent record label, currently based in Columbus, Ohio. ... ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In demonology, according to some authors, Agares (or Agaures) is a Prince, ruling the eastern zone of Hell, and being served by 30 legions of demons. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In demonology, Barbatos is an Earl and Duke of Hell, ruling thirty legions of demons and has four kings as his companions to command his legions. ... A woodcarving of Belial and some of his followers from Jacobus de Teramos book Buche Belial (1473) Belial (also Belhor, Baalial, Beliar, Belias , Beliall, Beliel; from Hebrew בְּלִיַּ֫עַל ; also named Matanbuchus, Mechembuchus, Meterbuchus in older scripts) is an evil being in Jewish apocrypha, and also a term used to characterise... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Uzziel was a Levite of ancient Israel who is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... In Christian demonology, Amy is the 58th spirit, a President of Hell, which maketh one marvelous in astrologie and in all the liberall sciences, and procured excellent familiars. ... In demonology, Beleth also spelled Bilet, Bileth and Byleth is a mighty and terrible king of Hell, who has eighty-five legions of demons under his command. ... In demonology, Crocell (also called Crokel or Procell) is the 49th spirit of the Goetia, manifesting as an angel with a tendency to speak in dark and mysterious manners. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In demonology Vual is a mighty Great Duke of Hell, commanding thirty-seven legions of demons. ...

Third Sphere

Principalities Archangels Angels

According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... 12th century icon of the Archangels Michael and Gabriel (Saint Catherines Monastery, Mount Sinai). ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is an ethereal being found in many religions, whose duties are to assist and serve God. ... In demonology, Belphegor (or Beelphegor) is a demon who helps people to make discoveries. ... Look up Ian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... According to the Bible, Nisroch is an Assyrian god in whose temple Sennacherib was worshiping when he was assassinated. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ... Dagon was a major northwest Semitic god, reportedly of grain and agriculture. ... For other uses, see Mephistopheles (disambiguation). ... Molech Moloch, Molech or Molekh, representing Hebrew מלך mlk, (translated directly into king) is either the name of a god or the name of a particular kind of sacrifice associated historically with Phoenician and related cultures in north Africa and the Levant. ... Rimmon (Hebrew pomegranate) is the proper name for a number of people or objects in the Hebrew Bible: A man of Beeroth (2 Samuel 4:2), one of the four Gibeonite cities. ... Rumjal is a fallen archangel mentioned in the Book of Enoch (1 Enoch 69) as one of the original two-hundred who joined Satan in rebellion. ... In demonology Thammuz is a demon of low category, considered inventor of the Inquisition, fire guns, artillery, and the one that stimulates men to torture other people. ... This article is about the angel. ... Araqiel was the 2nd Watcher of the 20 leaders of the 200 fallen angels that are mentioned in an ancient work called the Book of Enoch. ... Arioch originally appears in the Book of Genesis chap. ... Asael (Hebrew: עשהאל, Greek: ‘Ασεάλ) Etymology: Theophorous nominal name appearing in the Bible, made up of two parts: the verb עשה, Hebrew to do, make 3rd m. ... Asbeel, the name meaning deserter from God,[1] is a fallen angel in Christian mythology that appears in the first book of Enoch, chapter 69, verse 5: ^ Asbeel. ... Astoreth, a Phoenecian fertility goddess, was worshipped from around 1200 BC until 200 BC. Her name was synonymous with Astarte, and her cult centers were throughout the Palestine coastal region including Jerusalem. ... Caim is simply and merely a Gaelic rendering of biblical Cain, who appears in a variation of the fantastical pedigree of Dardanus that is spun out in Lebor Bretnach, the Middle Irish language recension of the compilation called Historia Brittonum (known in the 9th century version by Nennius). ...

Others

^ This link redirects to the Book of Enoch, which lists a large number of "the fallen". Abigor (1993) is an Austrian black metal band formed by P.K. and T.T.. After the release of several demos, original vocalist Tharen left the band and was replaced by Silenius, who recorded vocals for all Abigor releases until the recording of Channeling the Quintessence of Satan during which... Adirael is a fallen angel in Christian mythology. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... Asbeel, the name meaning deserter from God,[1] is a fallen angel in Christian mythology that appears in the first book of Enoch, chapter 69, verse 5: ^ Asbeel. ... For other uses, see Azazel (disambiguation). ... Azaradel is a fallen angel in Christian mythology that appears in the first book of Enoch, where he is said to teach humans the motions of the moon. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... Ouza, also Azza, Uzza, Semyaza, A major leader of the fall from heaven, also one of the angels that came down from heaven alongside Azael to interbreed with humans. ... Baraqel is one of the fallen angels in the Enoch listings. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... In demonology Flauros is a strong Great Duke of Hell, having thirty-six (twenty according to Pseudomonarchia Daemonum) legions of demons under his rule. ... Jetrel is the 15th episode of Star Trek: Voyager. ... Kôkhabîêl (Aramaic: כוכבאל, Greek: χωβαβιήλ) the angel of the stars, [1] was the 4th Watcher of the 20 leaders of the 200 fallen angels that are mentioned in an ancient work called the Book of Enoch. ... Mulciber is an alternative name of the Roman god Vulcan Mulciber is the name of a character in Paradise Lost. ... Naamah or Naamah (Hebrew: נעמה, meaning pleasant) is a figure in Jewish mysticism and Babylonian mythology. ... In Enoch lore, one of the Watchers/Grigori. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Rumjal is a fallen archangel mentioned in the Book of Enoch (1 Enoch 69) as one of the original two-hundred who joined Satan in rebellion. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... Sariel is one of the archangels mainly from Judaic and Islamic traditions. ... Tâmîêl (Aramaic: Unknown, Greek: Ταμιήλ) was the 5th Watcher of the 20 leaders of the 200 fallen angels that are mentioned in an ancient work called the Book of Enoch. ... Temeluchus is one of the tartaruchi, the chief angel of torment (and possibly Satan himself), according to the non-canonical Apocalypse of Paul. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), al-Ê•uzzā the Mightiest One or the strong (derived from the root Ê•zy) was a pre-Islamic Arabian fertility goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... The Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphal apocryphal work attributed to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. ... This article is about the angel. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

See also

For other uses, see Grigori (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ... This is a list of demons, including both specific demons (e. ...

Source

This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

Bibliography

  • Ashley, Leonard. The Complete Book of Devils and Demons Barricade Books. ISBN 1-56980-077-4
  • Bamberger, Bernard Jacob, (March 15, 2006). Fallen Angels: Soldiers of Satan's Realm, 300pp. ISBN 0-8276-0797-0
  • Davidson, Gustav, 1994. A Dictionary of Angels: Including the Fallen Angels. Free Press. ISBN 0-02-907052-X
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Fallen angels

Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fallen Angels (1213 words)
He became a fallen angel when he sinned as he went down to earth to be with mortal women.
When this particular fallen angel is invoked, he manifests as a beautiful angel astride a dragon, and he is carrying a snake in his hand.
He is also said to be a fallen angel ranked with Azza, and for cohabiting with daughters of men, was punished by having his nose pierced (with Uzza).
Fallen angel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1747 words)
In Abrahamic religions, a fallen angel is an angel that has been exiled or banished from Heaven.
Origen states metaphorically that, although some angels fell and became humans or demons, all hope is not lost.
Catholic theologians have speculated that the incarnation of Christ was revealed to the angels.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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