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Encyclopedia > Fall
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Autumn colours at Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England.
Fall redirects here. For other uses of that word, see Fall (disambiguation).

Autumn, often called fall in North America, is one of the four temperate seasons, the transition between summer and winter.


In the temperate zones, autumn is the season during which most crops are harvested, and deciduous trees lose their leaves. Astronomically, it begins with the autumnal equinox (around 23 September in the Northern hemisphere, and 21 March in the southern hemisphere), and ends with the winter solstice (around 21 December in the Northern hemisphere and 21 June in the Southern hemisphere). However, meteorologists count instead the whole months of March, April and May in the Southern hemisphere and September, October and November in the Northern hemisphere. An exception to these definitions is to be found in the Irish Calendar, which still follows the Celtic cycle, where Autumn is counted as the whole months of August, September and October.


Either definition, as with those of the seasons generally, is flawed because it assumes that the seasons are all of the same length, and begin and end at the same time throughout the temperate zone of each hemisphere.


Autumn and U.S. tourism

The New England region of the United States is known nationwide for the brilliance of its "fall foliage," and a seasonal tourist industry has grown up around the few weeks in autumn when the leaves are at their peak. Some television and web-based weather forecasts even report on the status of the fall foliage throughout the season as a service to tourists. Fall foliage tourists are often referred to as "leaf peepers".


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Falles - definition of Falles in Encyclopedia (475 words)
The ninots and their falles are developed according to an agreed upon theme that was, and continues to be a satyric jab at anything or anyone unlucky enough to draw the attention of the critical eyes of the Fallers - the celebrants themselves.
During Falles, many people from the neighborhood casal faller dress in the regional costumes from different eras of Valencia's history - the fife and drum are frequently heard, as most of the different casals fallers have their own traditional bands.
It is thought that the Falles started in the Middle Ages, when artisans put out their broken artifacts and pieces of wood that they sorted during the winter then burned them to celebrate the spring equinox.
NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Falles (2679 words)
The ninots and their falles are developed according to an agreed upon theme that was, and continues to be a satirical jab at anything or anyone unlucky enough to draw the attention of the critical eyes of the fallers — the celebrants themselves.
It is thought that the Falles started in the Middle Ages, when artisans put out their broken artifacts and pieces of wood that they sorted during the winter then burnt them to celebrate the spring equinox.
During Falles, many people from their casal faller dress in the regional costumes from different eras of Valencia's history — the fife and drum are frequently heard, as most of the different casals fallers have their own traditional bands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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