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Encyclopedia > Falkirk
Falkirk
Gaelic - An Eaglais Bhreac
Scots - Falkirk [fo̜kɪrk] (Fawkirk)
UK Parliament Falkirk
Falkirk West
Scottish Parliament Falkirk East
European Parliament Scotland
List of places: UKScotland

Falkirk (An Eaglais Bhreac, 'the Variagated [or 'Speckled'] Church' [presumably referring to a church building built of many-coloured stones]) in Scottish Gaelic, La Chapelle de Fayerie in French) is a town in central Scotland lying to the north west and north east of the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, respectively. In 2004 the population, according to the General Register Office for Scotland, was 32,890 making Falkirk the 20th largest settlement in Scotland.[1] Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Falkirk is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Falkirk West is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Falkirk East is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Logo of the General Register Office General Register Office for Scotland is a government agency, accountable to Scottish ministers, that administers the registration of births, deaths, marriages, divorces and adoptions, and is responsible for the statutes relating to the formalities of marriage and conduct of civil marriage. ...


The town lies at the junction of the Forth and Clyde Canal and the Union Canal, a location which proved pivotal to the growth of Falkirk as a centre of heavy industry during the Industrial Revolution. In the 18th and 19th Centuries Falkirk was at the centre of a large iron and steel industry, underpinned by the Carron Company which developed close to the town. In the last 50 years or so the vast majority of Falkirk's heavy industrial base has disappeared, with the economy of the town becoming increasingly services orientated. The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal in Scotland. ... The Union Canal is a 50 km (31. ... The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... Ironworks at Coalbrookdale, Shropshire, England An ironworks or iron works is a building or site where iron is smelted and where heavy iron and/or steel products are made. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... The Carron Company was an ironworks established in 1759 on the banks of the River Carron near Falkirk, in Stirlingshire, Scotland. ...


Today Falkirk functions as the principal retail and administrative centre for the wider Falkirk Council area. Attractions in and around Falkirk include the Falkirk Wheel, remnants of the Antonine wall, and Callendar House. Falkirk (an Eaglais Bhreac in Gaelic) is one of the 32 unitary authority council areas in Scotland. ... The Falkirk Wheel The Falkirk Wheel, named after the nearby town of Falkirk in central Scotland, is a rotating boat lift connecting the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal. ... The Antonine Wall, looking east, from Barr Hill between Twechar and Croy The Antonine Wall, remains of Roman fortlet, Barr Hill, near Twechar Location of Hadrians Wall and the Antonine Wall in Scotland and Northern England. ... Callendar House is an imposing mansion set within the grounds of Falkirks Callendar Park. ...

Contents

History

Callendar Park

The area has been of great strategic importance since the construction of the Antonine Wall between the Firths of Forth and Clyde in Roman times. Many of the best visible remains of the Romans in Scotland are in the Falkirk Area. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 276 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 276 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Firth of Forth from Calton Hill The Forth Bridges cross the Firth Satellite photo of the Firth and the surrounding area Map of the Firth Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotlands River Forth, where it flows into the North Sea... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ...


Falkirk is the only settlement in Great Britain to have a name in four languages:

  • Egglesbreth in English (previous name)
  • Falkirk (or Fawkirk) in Scots
  • La Chapelle de Fayerie in French
  • An Eaglais Bhreach in Scottish Gaelic

Two major battles took place at Falkirk:

In the 18th century the area served as the cradle of Scotland's industrial revolution, becoming the earliest major centre of the iron-casting industry: to this day, cast-iron cooking pots are known in Zimbabwe as "falkirks". The area was at the forefront of canal construction when the Forth and Clyde Canal opened in 1790. The Union Canal (1822) provided a link to Edinburgh and early railway development followed in the 1830s and 1840s. In the course of time, trunk road and motorways followed the same national strategic corridors through the Falkirk area. A large brickworks was set up at this time, owned by the Howie family. Combatants Scotland England Commanders William Wallace Edward I of England Strength 500 cavalry, 9,500 infantry 2,000 cavalry, 12,000 infantry. ... Events July 2 - The Battle of Göllheim is fought between Albert I of Habsburg and Adolf of Nassau-Weilburg. ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... During the Second Jacobite Rising, the Battle of Falkirk was the last noteworthy Jacobite success. ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... Henry Hawley (c. ... The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but can mean any of a group of iron-based alloys containing more than 2% carbon (alloys with less carbon are carbon steel by definition). ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas W Howie Thomas Wyllie Howie was born in Riccarton, Ayrshire, Scotland on 8 April 1856 to Robert and Bethia Howie. ...


Falkirk was the first town in Great Britain to have a fully automated system of street lighting, designed and implemented by a local firm, Thomas Laurie & Co Ltd.


Falkirk was, until 2007, home to the shortest street in Britain, Tolbooth Place behind the Steeple.


The town has two mottos: "Touch ane, touch a'" (Touch One Touch All) and "Better meddle wi' the de'il than the bairns o' Fawkirk" (Better meddle with the devil than with the bairns of Falkirk)


Geography

Falkirk is located in an area of undulating topography between the Slamannan Plateau and the upper reaches of the Firth of Forth. The area to the north of Falkirk is part of the floodplain of the River Carron. Two tributaries of the River Carron - the East Burn and the West Burn flow through the town and form part of its natural drainage system.[2] Falkirk sits at between 50 metres (164 ft) and 125 metres (410 ft) above sea level.[3] Slamannan (fromScottish Gaelic: Sliabh Mhanainn, slope of the Manau tribe) is a village in central Scotland. ... The Firth of Forth from Calton Hill The Forth Bridges cross the Firth Satellite photo of the Firth and the surrounding area Map of the Firth Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotlands River Forth, where it flows into the North Sea... The River Carron is a river in central Scotland. ...


The underlying geology of the town of Falkirk is characterised by glacial deposits. Elevations above 100m are covered by a mixture of glacial till and boulder clay with low lying areas covered by sandy soils and loams.[3] As Falkirk is not far from the coast, post-glacial features akin to raised beaches are particularly predominant to the north of the town centre, and this gives rise to differing elevations within the town.[3] Boulder clay in geology, is a deposit of clay, often full of boulders, which is formed in and beneath glaciers and ice-sheets wherever they are found, but is in a special sense the typical deposit of the Glacial Period in northern Europe and America. ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ... Loam is soil composed of a relatively even mixture of three mineral particle size groups: sand, silt, and clay. ... Although this raised beach at Rhossili (Wales) is now used for farmland, it provides evidence of a glacioeustatic rise in the land of this area. ...


Unsorted glacial till gives rise to such features of glacial deposition as eskers, and drumlins which are predomiant over much of the area. Such elements provide natural transportation routes and it is this complex underlying geology that the town is built upon.[3] A part of the Mason Esker Esker in Sims Corner Eskers and Kames National Natural Landmark, Washington state. ... Drumlin in Cato, New York Drowned drumlin in Clew Bay Drumlin at Withrow Moraine and Jameson Lake Drumlin Field National Natural Landmark A drumlin (Irish droimnín, a little hill ridge) is an elongated whale-shaped hill formed by glacial action. ...


Like much of the rest of Scotland, Falkirk has a temperate maritime climate, which is relatively mild despite its northerly latitude. Winters are especially mild given that Moscow and Labrador in Newfoundland lie on the same latitude, with daytime temperatures rarely falling below freezing, or 0°C. Summer temperatures are comparatively cool, with daily upper maxima rarely exceeding 23°C. The proximity of the town to the sea mitigates any large variations in temperature or extremes of climate. The prevailing wind direction is from the south-west, which is associated with warm, unstable air from the Gulf Stream that gives rise to rainfall. Winds from an easterly direction are usually drier but colder. Rainfall is distributed fairly evenly throughout the year. Vigorous Atlantic depressions - sometimes called European windstorms can affect the town between October and March. For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... An oceanic climate (also called marine west coast climate and maritime climate) is the climate typically found along the west coasts at the middle latitudes of all the worlds continents, and in southeastern Australia; similar climates are also found at high elevations within the tropics. ... Latitude,usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Labrador (also Coast of Labrador) is a region of Atlantic Canada. ... For other uses, see Newfoundland (disambiguation). ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... A European windstorm is a severe cyclonic storm that tracks across the North Atlantic towards north-west Europe in the winter months. ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average max. temperature
°CF)
6
(43)
7
(45)
9
(48)
11
(52)
15
(59)
17
(63)
19
(66)
19
(66)
16
(61)
13
(55)
9
(48)
7
(45)
13
(55)
Average min. temperature
°C (°F)
1
(34)
1
(34)
2
(36)
3
(37)
6
(43)
9
(48)
11
(52)
11
(52)
8
(46)
5
(41)
3
(37)
1
(34)
5
(41)
Rainfall
mm (inches)
100
(3.9)
70
(2.8)
77
(3.0)
56
(2.2)
62
(2.4)
56
(2.2)
62
(2.4)
76
(3.0)
77
(3.0)
101
(4.0)
81
(3.2)
107
(4.2)
925
(36.4)
Source: Met Office

Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Government and politics

A map showing the boundaries of the Falkirk Council area, one of the 32 Unitary authorities of Scotland. The town of Falkirk sits at the heart of the council area.
A map showing the boundaries of the Falkirk Council area, one of the 32 Unitary authorities of Scotland. The town of Falkirk sits at the heart of the council area.

From the middle of the 17th century to 1859, the affairs of the burgh of Falkirk were managed by the Stentmasters, a body elected by the trades of the town and latterly also by districts of Falkirk. Their duties, while largely financial, included repairs to the market place, the streets, water pipes, cisterns and wells, the Town Steeple; and the prevention of encroachments on the public streets by any of the inhabitants or others. They also had the duty of appointing a billeting master and a town drummer, and were responsible for the management of the general policy of the town and also for the laying of assessments on the corporations and inhabitants according to the apparent ability of the persons assessed to pay them. The Stentmasters continued to exist side by side with the Town Council for some years, the first Falkirk Town Council having been elected in the Red Lion Inn in November 1838. The number of members then composing the Town Council was twelve. Image File history File links Falkirk_towns. ... Image File history File links Falkirk_towns. ... Falkirk (an Eaglais Bhreac in Gaelic) is one of the 32 unitary authority council areas in Scotland. ...


Notable past Falkirk councillors include industrialist Thomas W. Howie and current Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling. Thomas W Howie Thomas Wyllie Howie was born in Riccarton, Ayrshire, Scotland on 8 April 1856 to Robert and Bethia Howie. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Alistair Maclean Darling (born November 28, 1953) is a British politician. ...


Today, like all towns in Scotland, Falkirk has a well-defined structure of governance from local government down to representation at European Union (EU) level. Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ...


In terms of local government the town sits at the heart of Falkirk Council area, one of the 32 Unitary Authorities of Scotland formed by the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994. The headquarters of the council are located in the Municipal Buildings, adjacent to Falkirk Town Hall, on West Bridge Street in the centre of town.[4] The Council is run by a Scottish National Party (SNP), independent and Conservative alliance as of early 2007.[4] The current Leader of the Council is Cllr David Alexander.[5] For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... The Local Government etc. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the Falkirk SNP Councillor, and not the Fife SNP Councillor, David J Alexander. ...


Falkirk is located within the Scottish parliamentary constituency of Falkirk West which elects one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) under the first past the post system.[6] The current MSP is Michael Matheson, who won the 2007 Scottish Parliament General Election by a margin of just 3%, less than the number of spoilt ballot papers, narrowly defeating his rival, Dennis Goldie, former Provost and well-known for his refusal to back the Labour Party's pro-gay rights stance. The previous MSP, Dennis Canavan, who sat as an Independent, was elected with the largest majority in the Scottish parliament representing Falkirk's electorate's displeasure with New Labour, but stepped down in 2007 for family reasons.[6] Canavan, who announced in an open letter to his constituents in January 2007, that he was stepping down from representative politics at the Scottish Parliament election, 2007 has been an MSP or MP for the area for over 30 years.[7] The constituency of Falkirk West also sits in the Central Scotland Scottish Parliament electoral region which returns seven MSPs under the additional member system used to elect Members of the Scottish Parliament.[8] For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Falkirk West is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... An example of a plurality ballot. ... Michael Matheson was born on September 8, 1970 and has been a Central Scotland MSP since 1999. ... Dennis Canavan (born 1942) is a Scottish politician, and an indepedent member of the Scottish Parliament. ... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ... The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ... Central Scotland (Meadhan-Alba in Gaelic) is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... The Additional Member System (AMS) is a voting system in which some representatives are elected from geographic constituencies and others are elected under proportional representation from party lists. ...


Minor fringe parties (on both sides of the political spectrum) are relatively popular in Falkirk compared with the rest of Scotland. In the 2007 elections, Falkirk had the highest proportion (though it was still very small) of British National Party voters anywhere in Scotland. Parties right of the Conservative Party won 6.2% of the vote in Central Scotland in total (including the Scottish Christian Party, United Kingdom Independence Party and others). Left of Labour parties won 5.9% in total (including the Scottish Green Party, the Scottish Socialist Party, Solidarity and others). None of these parties won a seat, however. Five seats were won by the SNP, one by the Conservatives and one by the Liberal Democrats. The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish Christian Party is a minor Christian Right political organisation in Scotland and a sister organisation to the group Operation Christian Vote [1] which has fought elections in England and Scotland, including at the 2005 UK general election. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced //) is a British political party. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a radical left-wing Scottish political party which campaigns on a socialist economic platform and for Scottish independence. ... Solidarity (Polish: ; full name: Independent Self-governing Trade Union Solidarity — Niezależny Samorządny Związek Zawodowy Solidarność) is a Polish trade union federation founded in September 1980 at the then Lenin Shipyards, and originally led by Lech Wałęsa. ...


In the Parliament of the United Kingdom, the town is entirely contained within the UK parliamentary constituency of Falkirk which elects one member to the House of Commons under the plurality system.[9] The constituency also takes in surrounding villages and is currently represented by the Labour Member of Parliament (MP) Eric Joyce.[9] Traditionally, Falkirk has been seen as a stronghold for the Labour Party, but an SNP majority in the 2007 Scottish elections suggest a change of public opinion.[9] Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... Falkirk is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... A plurality, relative majority or simple majority is the largest share of something, which may or may not be considered a majority, i. ... The Labour Party is an Anti-English political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Major Eric Joyce (born October 13, 1960, in Perth, Scotland) is a British politician and Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Falkirk reprsenting the Labour Party. ...


At EU level, Falkirk is part of the pan-Scotland European Parliament constituency which elects seven Members of the European Parliament (MEP)s using the d'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation.[10] Currently, Scotland returns two Labour MEPs, two Conservative and Unionist MEPs, two SNP MEPs and one Liberal Democrat MEP, to the European Parliament.[10] Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP) is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... The DHondt method (equivalent to Jeffersons method) is a highest averages method for allocating seats in party-list proportional representation. ... Party-list proportional representation systems are a family of voting systems used in multiple-winner elections (e. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Economy and population

The pedestrianised High Street, dominated by the Steeple (1814) is the retail centre of Falkirk.
The pedestrianised High Street, dominated by the Steeple (1814) is the retail centre of Falkirk.

Today, the economy of Falkirk is focussed on Retail and Services, in contrast to the heavy industries and manufacturing sectors which contributed to the growth of the town over the last 300 years. Falkirk is a large retail centre catering to the town itself and a wide surrounding area, stretching from Cumbernauld in the west to Bo'ness in the east.[11] The flagship retailer Marks and Spencer opened a store in Falkirk in 1936.[11] The High Street was pedestrianised in the late 1980s and the Howgate Shopping Centre opened in [11]1989. A number of supermarkets including Tesco, ASDA and Morrisons have developed on peripheral sites surrounding the town centre in recent years.[12] Image File history File linksMetadata FalkirkHighStreet. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FalkirkHighStreet. ... , Cumbernauld (Gaelic: Comar nan Allt) is a new town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, created in 1956 as a population overflow for Glasgow. ... , Boness, properly Borrowstounness, is a town in the Falkirk council area of Scotland, lying on a hillside on the south bank of the Firth of Forth. ... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... ASDA is a chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom offering food, clothing and general merchandise products. ... For other uses, see Morrison. ...


The Public sector and public services also have a foothold in the Falkirk area. Falkirk Council is one of the largest employers in this sphere, with a workforce of over 7,000, many based at the Council headquarters in the town centre.[4] One of the principal offices of the UK Child Support Agency, covering Scotland and the north east of England, is located in the Callendar Business Park on the outskirts of Falkirk.[13] Similarly the National Health Service (NHS) and Department for Work and Pensions have a presence in the town and employ local residents. The Child Support Agency (or CSA) is a UK Government Executive Agency, part of the Department for Work and Pensions, launched on April 5, 1993. ... The logo of NHS Scotland NHSScotland is the official corporate style of the National Health Service operations in Scotland. ... The Department for Work and Pensions is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom, created on June 8, 2001 from the merger of the Employment part of the Department for Education and Employment and the Department of Social Security. ...


Many Falkirk residents are also employed within the petrochemicals sector based in the neighbouring town of Grangemouth where there is an agglomeration of such industries underpinned by the BP oil refinery located there.[14] Alexander Dennis, one of the world's largest bus manufacturers, is headquartered in Falkirk with the operations plant located nearby.[15] A petrochemical is any chemical derived from fossil fuel. ... Grangemouth petrochemical works, November 2006 A map of Grangemouth from 1945 Grangemouth is a town and former burgh in the council area of Falkirk, Scotland, and formerly in the County of Stirling. ... In the study of human settlements, an agglomeration is an extended city or town area comprising the built-up area of a central place (usually a municipality) and any suburbs or adjacent satellite towns. ... This article is about the corporation named BP. For other uses, see BP (disambiguation). ... Alexander Dennis Limited (formerly known as TransBus International) is the largest bus builder in the United Kingdom and one of the largest in the world. ...


The United Kingdom Census 2001 identified the town as having a total resident population of 32,379[16] with 2004 estimates placing the total population at 32,890.[1] The population of the town and surrounding area is forecast to grow over the next ten years, primarily due to net in migration from other parts of Scotland and the UK.[17] Unemployment in the Falkirk area is low at 2.5%, below the Scottish average, however average household income and gross weekly pay are below the comparative Scottish and UK averages.[17] UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ...


Culture

The area has an equally high reputation for its new residential, retail, heritage and leisure developments and it has gained much popularity as a place to live and a place to visit.


On the first Thursday of every month, the Falkirk Wheel Car Park (lower) plays host to Scotland's biggest car cruise, where car enthusiasts meet to show their cars and enjoy the atmosphere.


Heritage and culture have importance for residents and visitors alike, with attractions such as:

As the cradle of the Industrial Revolution in Scotland, a wide rich-poor gap was created, leading to one commentator to observe in the 1950s, "the poorer and the richer social groups (some very poor and some very wealthy) live close together and under the eyes of each other in Falkirk"*. This can be seen most notably in Woodlands, Falkirk, where very large residences are often very close to, or even facing, council housing. It has also meant that there is a very strong Conservative Party area in Woodlands and Polmont, while the others are mainly very strong Labour Party areas. The Falkirk Steeple The Falkirk Steeple has been a landmark in Falkirk since the late 15th century. ... The Bo’ness & Kinneil Railway, operated by the Scottish Railway Preservation Society, operates virtually the entire Bo’ness branch of the former North British Railway on the Firth of Forth. ... Big in Falkirk is Scotlands National Street Arts Festival. ... A city-centre street in Frankfurt, Germany A residential street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA A street is a public thoroughfare in the built environment. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Falkirk Football Club are a Scottish football team based in Falkirk, playing in the Scottish Premier League after winning promotion from the Scottish First Division in season 2004/05. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... East Stirlingshire Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Falkirk. ... The Scottish Football League Third Division is the third highest division of the Scottish Football League and the fourth highest overall in the Scottish football league system. ... The Falkirk Wheel The Falkirk Wheel, named after the nearby town of Falkirk in central Scotland, is a rotating boat lift connecting the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal. ... The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... A large home in Woodlands, Falkirk Woodlands is a large central area (ward) of Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland, which is mainly residential. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is an Anti-English political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Twin towns

Falkirk is twinned with:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Quimper (Kemper in Breton, Corspotium in Latin) is a commune of Brittany in northwestern France. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Créteil is a town and commune of France, in the south-eastern suburbs of Paris, préfecture (capital) of the Val-de-Marne département. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The Odenwald is a mountain chain in southern Hessen, northern Bavaria and northern Baden-Württemberg. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... San Rafael (the name of the Archangel Raphael) is a common place-name in areas where the Spanish-language is spoken: Towns, cities, municipalities, etc. ...

Infrastructure

Health

The Falkirk and District Royal Infirmary (FDRI) is the principal public hospital serving the town of Falkirk and the surrounding area and is administered by NHS Forth Valley.[18] In recent years the accident and emergency services at the hospital have been downgraded with major A&E facilities having been consolidated to the Stirling and District Royal Infirmary.[19] However, the FDRI continues to have a Minor Injury Unit, to treat emergency cases of a non life threatening nature.[19] Maternity provision at the FDRI has also been consolidated to Stirling.[18] A new £300m hospital for the NHS Forth Valley area (which includes the unitary authorities of Falkirk, Stirling and Clackmannanshire) is to be built and opened at Larbert by 2009.[19] This will replace and combine the existing facilties at both Falkirk and Stirling.[19] The logo of NHS Scotland NHSScotland is the official corporate style of the National Health Service operations in Scotland. ... The emergency room is the American English term for a room, or group of rooms, within a hospital that is designed for the treatment of urgent and medical emergencies. ... Maternity is the social and legal acknowledgment of the parental relationship between a mother and her child. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... Look Aboot Ye Clackmannanshire (Siorrachd Chlach Mhannainn in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area, bordering Perth and Kinross, Stirling and Fife. ... Larbert is a parish and town of Stirlingshire, Scotland, Pop. ...


Transport

The view from the footbridge at Falkirk Grahamston, looking towards the east. The main station building (located on the left) was opened in 1985 and serves over 950,000 passenger journeys each year.
The view from the footbridge at Falkirk Grahamston, looking towards the east. The main station building (located on the left) was opened in 1985 and serves over 950,000 passenger journeys each year.

The Falkirk Area occupies a central position in Scotland, on the key north-south and east-west motorway, rail and canal routes and within easy reach of Edinburgh and Glasgow airports; Falkirk is well situated both for access from England and for access to other parts of Scotland. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... The eastbound platform at Falkirk Grahamston railway station, looking westward Falkirk Grahamston railway station is one of two railway stations serving the town of Falkirk in Scotland. ... Falkirk (an Eaglais Bhreac in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Falkirk has two railway stations; Falkirk High and Falkirk Grahamston. Falkirk High is situated on the main Glasgow-Edinburgh line, with connections to either city running on a 15-minute frequency. At peak times 8 trains per hour stop; 4 for Glasgow Queen Street via Croy and 4 for Edinburgh Waverley via Polmont and Linlithgow. Journey times to Edinburgh vary from 27 minutes to 38 minutes depending on stopping stations and time of day; to Glasgow the journey time is between 23 and 26 minutes. Falkirk High railway station is one of two railway stations serving the town of Falkirk in Scotland. ... The eastbound platform at Falkirk Grahamston railway station, looking westward Falkirk Grahamston railway station is one of two railway stations serving the town of Falkirk in Scotland. ... Falkirk High railway station is one of two railway stations serving the town of Falkirk in Scotland. ... The Glasgow to Edinburgh via Falkirk Line is a mainline railway line linking Glasgow and Edinburgh via Falkirk in Scotland. ... Glasgow Queen Street is a railway station in Glasgow, Scotland and is the citys second main line terminus. ... Croy railway station is a railway station serving approximately half of Cumbernauld, the rest of which is served by Cumbernauld Station, and Croy village, both in North Lanarkshire. ... Waverley railway station- the principal mainline station in Edinburgh viewed from Edinburgh Castle. ... The eastbound platform at Polmont railway station, looking westward Polmont railway station is a railway station serving the town of Polmont in Falkirk, Scotland. ... The eastbound platform (looking west) at Linlithgow railway station Linlithgow railway station is a railway station serving the town of Linlithgow in West Lothian, Scotland. ...


Falkirk Grahamston lies on the Edinburgh to Dunblane Line. Trains from Glasgow Queen Street on the Cumbernauld Line terminate at Falkirk Grahamston. There is also a daily direct service to London (King's Cross) provided by GNER, and the Caledonian Sleeper to London Euston also calls here. The eastbound platform at Falkirk Grahamston railway station, looking westward Falkirk Grahamston railway station is one of two railway stations serving the town of Falkirk in Scotland. ... The Edinburgh to Dunblane Line is a railway line in East Central Scotland. ... The Cumbernauld Line is a suburban railway line linking Glasgow and Cumbernauld in Scotland. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... ... GNER White Rose train at Kings Cross railway station Great North Eastern Railways (GNER) is a British train operating company (TOC) owned by Sea Containers Ltd. ... Map of the routes of the Caledonian Sleepers Caledonian Sleeper coaches at Fort William The Caledonian Sleeper is a sleeper train service operated by First ScotRail and one of only two remaining sleeper services running on the railways of Great Britain – the other being the Night Riviera. ... Facade of Euston Station, London Euston Arch: the original Euston Station, as enlarged, ca 1851 Euston station concourse Euston station (also known as London Euston), is a large railway station in Central London. ...


The Forth and Clyde Canal and the Union Canal pass nearby, interconnected by the famous Falkirk Wheel, a rotating boat lift. The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal in Scotland. ... The Union Canal is a 50 km (31. ... The Falkirk Wheel The Falkirk Wheel, named after the nearby town of Falkirk in central Scotland, is a rotating boat lift connecting the Forth and Clyde Canal with the Union Canal. ... Strépy-Thieu boat lift (Belgium). ...


Sport

Falkirk has 2 football teams who are Falkirk F.C. and East Stirlingshire F.C.. Falkirk F.C are in the Scottish Premier League and East Stirling are in Scottish Third Division. East Stirlingshire have been bottom of the third division for 5 seasons now and if they finish bottom for a sixth, they will be thrown out of the league and become Associate Members Falkirk Football Club are a Scottish football team based in Falkirk, playing in the Scottish Premier League after winning promotion from the Scottish First Division in season 2004/05. ... East Stirlingshire Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Falkirk. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... The Scottish Football League Third Division is the third highest division of the Scottish Football League and the fourth highest overall in the Scottish football league system. ...


Falkirk also has a Hockey team, Falkirk GHG Hockey Club, which was formed from the merger of Graeme High School Former Pupils Hockey Club and Grangemouth Hockey Club in 1999. It now has 5 mens teams which play in various different leagues, with their first team playing in national league.


Notes and citations

  1. ^ a b 2004 Localities in descending order of size. General Register Office for Scotland (GROS). Retrieved on 2007-03-24.
  2. ^ Milne et al (1975) p1
  3. ^ a b c d Milne et al (1975) p2
  4. ^ a b c Falkirk Council - About the Council. Falkirk Council. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  5. ^ Falkirk Council - Council Members. Falkirk Council. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  6. ^ a b Previous Elections - 2003 Scottish Parliamentary Election - Falkirk West. The Scotsman. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  7. ^ Louise Gray. "'I'm filled with regret that I didn't spend more time with family'", The Scotsman, 2007-01-24. Retrieved on 2007-01-31. 
  8. ^ Scottish Parliament Electoral System. Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) (2006-08-31). Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  9. ^ a b c All Scottish Seats - 2005 UK General Election - Falkirk. The Scotsman. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  10. ^ a b UK MEPs - Scotland. European Parliament. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  11. ^ a b c Smith, R (2001) p345
  12. ^ Smith, R (2001) p346
  13. ^ Falkirk - Scotland and North East England Business Unit. Child Support Agency. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  14. ^ David Gibson (2001-11-13). BP Grangemouth announcement - Scottish Enterprise Forth Valley reaction. Scottish Enterprise. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  15. ^ Alexander Dennis, Key facts. Alexander Dennis. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  16. ^ Comparative Population Profile, Locality: Falkirk. Scotland's Census Results Online (SCROL). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  17. ^ a b Falkirk as a Location, Statistical Information on the Council Area. Falkirk Council (December 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  18. ^ a b Services carried out at Falkirk and Stirling Royal Infirmaries. NHS Forth Valley. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  19. ^ a b c d NHS Forth Valley Emergency Services. NHS Forth Valley. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Dowds, T (2003): "The Forth and Clyde Canal - A History". Tuckwell Press. ISBN 1-8623-2232-5
  • Macleod, I (2004): "The Illustrated Encyclopaedia of Scotland". Lomond Books, Edinburgh. ISBN 1-8420-4028-6
  • Milne, D; Leitch, A; Duncan, A; Bairner, J & Johnston, J (1975): "The Falkirk and Grangemouth Area". Paper for the Scottish Association of Geography Teachers' (SAGT) conference, October 1975. Moray House College of Education, Edinburgh.
  • Nimmo W (1880): "The History of Stirlingshire, Third Edition" Vol II. Hamilton, Adams and Company, Glasgow.
  • Smith, R (2001): "The Making of Scotland". Canongate Books, Edinburgh. ISBN 1-8419-5170-6

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
History of Falkirk (2233 words)
Then too, the ridge of Falkirk was on the direct route between Edinburgh, Linlithgow, Stirling and the North, and it would be early seen that it was advantageous to have a settlement which was not more than a day's journey between those other ancient places of habitation, Linlithgow and Stirling.
Falkirk again comes clearly into the light of History in the year 1080, when Robert, son of William the Conqueror, has his army turned back at Egglesbreth, the Welsh name by which the settlement on the ridge of land above the carse was then known.
From the middle of the 17th century to 1859, the affairs of the burgh of Falkirk were managed by the Stentmasters, a body elected by the trades of the town and latterly also by districts of Falkirk.
Falkirk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (738 words)
Falkirk is also the name of the Scottish council area centred on the town, see Falkirk (council area).
Falkirk (An Eaglais Bhreac in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in central Scotland.
The Falkirk Area occupies a central position in Scotland, on the key north-south and east-west motorway and rail routes and within easy reach of Edinburgh and Glasgow airports; Falkirk is well situated both for access from England and for access to other parts of Scotland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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