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Encyclopedia > Factory Records
FAC 115: Factory Records Stationery (1984)
FAC 115: Factory Records Stationery (1984)

Factory Records was a Manchester based British independent record label, started in 1978, which featured several prominent musical acts on its roster such as Joy Division, New Order, A Certain Ratio, The Durutti Column, Happy Mondays, and (briefly) James and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. Like the label 4AD Records, Factory Records used a creative team (most notably record producer Martin Hannett and graphic designer Peter Saville) which gave the label, and the artists recording for it, a particular sound and image. The label employed a unique cataloguing system that gave a number not just to its musical releases, but to artwork and other objects. Image File history File links Factory_records. ... Image File history File links Factory_records. ... The following is a list of items with recorded Factory Records numbers. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... See also: 1970s in music. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... No U.K. act crystallized independent, punk-influenced funk more than Manchesters A Certain Ratio. ... See Durruti Column for the anarchist column during the Spanish Civil War. ... Happy Mondays are an English alternative rock band from Salford, Greater Manchester. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (often abbreviated to OMD) are a synth pop group whose founder members are originally from the Wirral Peninsula, UK. OMD record for Virgin Records (originally for Virgins DinDisc subsidiary). ... The British indie rock record label 4AD Records was started in 1979 by Ivo Watts-Russell and Peter Kent, funded by Beggars Banquet Records. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Martin Hannett (May 31, 1948) – April 18, 1991 )), sometimes credited as Martin Zero, was an innovative record producer who helped develop Joy Division and co-founded Factory Records with Tony Wilson. ... Graphics are often utilitarian and anonymous,[1] as these pictographs from the US National Park Service illustrate. ... Peter Saville (born 1955 in Manchester[1]) is an English graphic designer based in London. ...

Contents

History

Factory's genesis was in January 1978, when Tony Wilson, a TV presenter on Granada Television, formed a partnership with Alan Erasmus, an unemployed actor and band manager. The Factory name was first used for a club in May of that year, which featured local bands including The Durutti Column (managed at the time by Erasmus and Wilson), Cabaret Voltaire from Sheffield and Joy Division. Advertising for the club was designed by Peter Saville, and in September the trio decided to release an EP of music by acts who had played at the club (The Durutti Column, Joy Division, Cabaret Voltaire and comedian John Dowie). Gretton decided he didn't want Joy Division to end up signing to a London record label, he wanted to do it all in Manchester and so Factory Records was born, with Wilson, Erasmus, Saville and producer Martin Hannett as partners in the enterprise. In 1978 Wilson compared the new wave afternoon at the legendary Deeply Vale Festivals and this was actually the fourth live appearance by the fledgling Durutti Column and that afternoon Wilson also introduced an appearance (very early in their career) by The Fall featuring a young Mark E Smith and a young Mark "Lard" Riley on bass guitar. Anthony Howard Wilson (20 February 1950 – 10 August 2007) was an English record label owner, radio presenter, TV show host, nightclub manager, impresario and journalist for Granada Television and the BBC. Wilson, commonly known as Tony Wilson, was the music mogul behind some of Manchesters most successful bands. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alan Erasmus was the co-founder of Factory Records with Tony Wilson. ... See Durruti Column for the anarchist column during the Spanish Civil War. ... Cabaret Voltaire was a British music group from Sheffield, England. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... This article is about the band. ... Peter Saville (born 1955 in Manchester[1]) is an English graphic designer based in London. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Martin Hannett (May 31, 1948) – April 18, 1991 )), sometimes credited as Martin Zero, was an innovative record producer who helped develop Joy Division and co-founded Factory Records with Tony Wilson. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Durutti Column is the ongoing band project of gifted Manchester guitarist Vini Reilly (born August ?, 1953), usually accompanied by the talents of drummer Bruce Mitchell. ... This article is about the band. ... Mark E. Smith (born March 5, 1957) is the lead singer, lyricist and hub of The Fall, a renowned and idiosyncratic offshoot from the UK post-punk/new wave music scenes. ... Marc Lard Riley is a musician, alternative rock critic and DJ on BBC 6 Music where he presents Rocket Science on Saturday afternoons and Mint on Sunday evenings. ...


The Factory label set up an office in Erasmus's home on Palatine Road, and the EP was released in early 1979. Singles followed by A Certain Ratio (who would stay with the label), and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (who left for Virgin Records shortly afterwards). The first Factory LP, Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures, was released in June. Joy Division would make a notable appearance at the Leigh Rock Festival in August 1979. Joy Division manager Rob Gretton became the fifth partner in the label towards the end of the year, and the Factory club closed down (it would reopen briefly the following year). No U.K. act crystallized independent, punk-influenced funk more than Manchesters A Certain Ratio. ... Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (often abbreviated to OMD) are a synth pop group whose founder members are originally from the Wirral Peninsula, UK. OMD record for Virgin Records (originally for Virgins DinDisc subsidiary). ... Virgin Records was a British recording label founded by English entrepreneur Richard Branson, and Nik Powell in 1972. ... This article is about the album by Joy Division. ... Rob Gretton (January 15, 1953 - May 15, 1999) was best known as the manager of the post punk bands Joy Division and New Order. ...


In January 1980 The Return of the Durutti Column was released, the first in a long series of releases by the "band" (now effectively a solo project for guitarist Vini Reilly). In May, Joy Division singer Ian Curtis committed suicide shortly before a planned tour of the USA. The following month saw Joy Division's "Love Will Tear Us Apart" reach the UK top twenty, and second album Closer was released the following month. In late 1980 the remaining members of Joy Division decided to continue as New Order. Factory branched out, with Factory Benelux being run as an independent label in conjunction with Les Disques du Crepuscule, and Factory US organising distribution for the UK label's releases in America. Ian Kevin Curtis (July 15, 1956 – May 18, 1980) was the vocalist and lyricist of the band Joy Division, which he helped form in 1977 in Manchester, England. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Love Will Tear Us Apart Original single sleeve Love Will Tear Us Apart is the best known song by the band Joy Division. ... Closer is a 1980 album by Joy Division. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Les Disques Du Crépuscule was a Belgian independent record label. ...


In 1981, Factory and New Order decided to open a nightclub, and preparations were made to convert a Victorian textile factory near the centre of Manchester, which had lately seen service as a motor boat showroom. Hannett left the label, as he had wanted to open a recording studio, and subsequently sued for unpaid royalties (the case was settled out of court in 1984). Saville also quit as a partner due to problems with payments (although he continued to work for Factory). Wilson, Erasmus and Gretton formed Factory Communications Ltd. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Limited liability company. ...


The Haçienda (FAC 51) opened in May 1982. Although successful in terms of attendance, and attracting a lot of praise for Ben Kelly's interior design, the club lost large amounts of money in its first few years due largely to the low prices charged for entrance and at the bar, which was markedly cheaper than nearby pubs. Adjusting bar prices failed to help matters significantly, as by the mid 80s crowds were increasingly preferring ecstasy to alcohol. Therefore the Hacienda ended up costing New Order 10,000 pounds a month. The Hacienda Fac 51 Haçienda (also known as simply The Haçienda) was one of the most well known nightclubs in Manchester during the Madchester years of the late 1980s and early 1990s. ...


The following year, New Order's "Blue Monday" became an international chart hit, and 1985 saw the first release by Happy Mondays. The two bands were to be the most successful on the label, bankrolling a host of other projects. Factory, and the Haçienda, became a cultural hub of the emerging techno and acid house genres, and their amalgamation with post-punk guitar music (the "Madchester" scene). Audio sample Blue Monday is a dance pop song recorded and released as a single in 1983 by British band New Order. ... Happy Mondays are an English alternative rock band from Salford, Greater Manchester. ... Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ...


Factory also opened a bar (The Dry Bar, FAC 201) and a shop (The Area, FAC 281) in the Northern Quarter of Manchester. Factory's headquarters (FAC 251) on Charles Street, near the Oxford Road BBC building, were opened in September 1990 (prior to which the company was still registered at Alan Erasmus' flat in Didsbury). The Northern Quarter is an area in the city centre of Manchester, UK, generally marked out between Piccadilly, Victoria and Ancoats, and centred around Oldham Street, just off Piccadilly Gardens. ... Didsbury is a suburb of Manchester, in North West England. ...


In 1991 Hannett died - he had re-established a relationship with the label, working with Happy Mondays, and tributes including a compilation album and a festival were organised. Saville's association with Factory was now reduced to simply designing for New Order and their solo projects (the band itself was in suspension, with various members recording as Electronic, Revenge and The Other Two). Electronic was an alternative rock/dance group formed by New Order singer and guitarist Bernard Sumner and ex-Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr. ... Revenge was a side project of New Order bassist Peter Hook (vocals, bass, keyboards). ... The dance act The Other Two are Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert of New Order. ...


By 1992, ironically, the label was in serious financial trouble due to the two bands who had been most successful. The Happy Mondays were recording their troubled fourth album Yes Please in Barbados, and New Order reportedly spent £400,000 on recording their comeback album Republic. London Records were interested in taking over Factory, but the deal fell through when it emerged that due to Factory's early practice of eschewing contracts, New Order's back catalogue was owned by the band rather than the label. Factory Communications Ltd, the company formed in 1981, declared bankruptcy in November 1992. Many of the former Factory acts, including New Order, found a new home at London Records. London Records is a record label headquartered in the United Kingdom, originally marketing records in the United States, Canada and Latin America from 1947 through the 1980s. ... See also: 1992 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 1992 Record labels established in 1992 // 1992 was a pivotal year in the development of music. ...


The Haçienda closed in 1997 and shortly afterwards was demolished and was replaced by a modern luxury apartment block in 2003. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 2002 film 24 Hour Party People is centred around Factory Records, the Haçienda, and the infamous, often unsubstantiated anecdotes and stories surrounding them. Many of the people associated with Factory, including Tony Wilson, have minor parts in 24 Hour Party People (the central character, based on Wilson, is played by Steve Coogan). The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthony Howard Wilson (20 February 1950 – 10 August 2007) was an English record label owner, radio presenter, TV show host, nightclub manager, impresario and journalist for Granada Television and the BBC. Wilson, commonly known as Tony Wilson, was the music mogul behind some of Manchesters most successful bands. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stephen John Steve Coogan (born 14 October 1965) is an English actor, impressionist, and comedian. ...


Anthony Wilson, who founded Factory records, the label behind New Order and the Happy Mondays, died on 10 August 2007 aged 57, due to complications arising from renal cancer[1].


FAC numbers

See also: Factory Records Catalogue

All the label's releases (both music and video) were given a catalogue number of the form FAC followed by a number. This numbering system was also applied to other Factory "productions", including posters (FAC 1 advertised a club night), The Haçienda (FAC 51), a hairdressing salon (FAC 98), a broadcast of Channel 4's The Tube (FAC 104), sellotape (FAC 136), a bucket on a restored watermill (FAC 148), the Haçienda cat (FAC 191), a bet between Wilson and Gretton (FAC 253), a lawsuit filed against Factory Records by Martin Hannett (FAC 61)[2] and a radio advertisement (FAC 294). Factory Benelux releases were similarly numbered (FAC BN or FBN), but the numbers were restricted to record releases. The following is a list of items with recorded Factory Records numbers. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Screenshot of The Tubes neon sign trademark The Tube was an innovative United Kingdom pop/rock music television programme, which ran for 5 series, from 1982 until 1987. ... Sellotape is a European brand of transparent, cellulose-based, pressure-sensitive adhesive tape, and is the leading brand of clear sticky tape in the United Kingdom. ...


Numbers were not allocated in strict chronological order - numbers for Joy Division and New Order releases generally ended in 3 or 0, A Certain Ratio and Happy Mondays in 2, The Durutti Column in 4. Factory Classical releases were 226, 236 and so on.


Despite the demise of Factory Records in 1992, the catalogue was still active, additions including the 24 Hour Party People film (FAC 401), its website (FAC 433) and DVD release (FACDVD 424). This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The last ever Factory catalogue number was given to Tony Wilson's coffin (FAC 501), reported on the site 'Cerysmatic Factory' [1]


Factory Classical

In 1989, Factory Classical was launched with five albums by composer Steve Martland, the Kreisler String Orchestra, the Duke String Quartet (which included Durutti Column viola player John Metcalfe), oboe player Robin Williams and pianist Rolf Hind. Composers included Martland, Benjamin Britten, Paul Hindemith, Francis Poulenc, Dmitri Shostakovich, Michael Tippett, György Ligeti and Elliott Carter. Releases continued until 1992, including albums by Graham Fitkin, vocal duo Red Byrd, a recording of Erik Satie's Socrate, Piers Adams playing Handel's Recorder Sonatas, Walter Hus and further recordings both of Martland's compositions and of the composer playing Mozart. Steve Martland (b. ... John Metcalfe (born 1964 in New Zealand) is a British composer and violist, and a former member of the band the Durutti Column. ... The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Britten redirects here. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc (IPA: ) (January 7, 1899 - January 30, 1963) was a French composer and a member of the French group Les Six. ... Dmitri Shostakovich in 1942 Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906 – August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... Sir Michael Kemp Tippett, OM (2 January 1905 – 8 January 1998) was one of the foremost English composers of the 20th century. ... “Ligeti” redirects here. ... Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. ... Graham Fitkin (born 1963) is a British composer. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ... Socrate is a work for voice and small orchestra (or piano) by Erik Satie. ... “Handel” redirects here. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... Sonata (From Latin and Italian sonare, to sound), in music, literally means a piece played as opposed to cantata (Latin cantare, to sing), a piece sung. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ...


Factory Too and beyond

In 1994, Wilson attempted to revive Factory Records, in collaboration with London Records, as "Factory Too". The first release was by Factory stalwarts The Durutti Column, the other main acts on the label were Hopper and Space Monkeys, and the label also gave a UK release to the first album by Stephin Merritt's side project The 6ths, Wasps' Nests. A further release ensued: a compilation EP featuring previously unsigned Manchester acts East West Coast, The Orch, Italian Love Party and K-Track. This collection of 8 tracks (2 per band) was simply entitled A Factory Sample Too (FACD2.02). The label was active until the late 1990s, as was "Factory Once", which organised reissues of Factory material. Wilson got frustrated with the lack of freedom and the need of London Records to show profits and he left the venture with London Records to set up the short lived Factory Records LTD with only one band remaining - Space Monkeys who shortly after released an album "the daddy of them all". Hopper and The Durutti Column had already left Factory Too when Wilson left the company of London Records. In 2006 Wilson launched F4 Records with only a few bands - Raw-T (a grime collective) The Young Offenders Institute and some exclusive online tracks from The Durutti Column. The label closed in early 2007 when Wilson found out he had cancer and despite treatment, Tony Wilson died of an unrelated heart attack on 10th August 2007 Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... See Durruti Column for the anarchist column during the Spanish Civil War. ... The Space Monkeys were a four-piece band from Manchester, England, signed to Factory Records and Interscope Records in the USA. The band members were Richard McNevin-Duff (lead singer and guitarist), Tony Pipes (DJ, keyboards, and samples), Dom Morrison (bass), and Chas Morrison (drums). ... Stephin Merritt (born 1966) is an American singer-songwriter based in New York City. ... The 6ths is a band created by Stephin Merritt, also the prime mover behind The Magnetic Fields, The Gothic Archies and Future Bible Heroes. ...


Factory Records recording artists

See also: List of Factory Records recording artists

The bands with the most numerous releases on Factory Records include New Order, Happy Mondays, Durutti Column and A Certain Ratio. Each of these bands has between 15 and 30 FAC numbers attributed to their releases. See List of Factory Records recording artists for lists and resources, and for a complete list of bands with Factory Records output. Following is a list of Factory Records recording artists compiled by FAC number. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Happy Mondays are an English alternative rock band from Salford, Greater Manchester. ... The Durutti Column is the ongoing band project of gifted Manchester guitarist Vini Reilly (born August ?, 1953), usually accompanied by the talents of drummer Bruce Mitchell. ... No U.K. act crystallized independent, punk-influenced funk more than Manchesters A Certain Ratio. ... Following is a list of Factory Records recording artists compiled by FAC number. ...


See also

This is a list of record labels. ... This is a list of notable independent record labels based in the United Kingdom. ...

References

  1. ^ Factory Records founder Anthony Wilson dies from cancer
  2. ^ BBC Film: "Factory: From Joy Division to Happy Mondays"

External links

This article is about the band. ... Ian Kevin Curtis (July 15, 1956 – May 18, 1980) was the vocalist and lyricist of the band Joy Division, which he helped form in 1977 in Manchester, England. ... Bernard Sumner (born 4 January 1956 in Broughton, Salford, Lancashire, England, and also known as Bernard Dickin, Bernard Dicken, Bernard Albrecht and Bernard Albrecht-Dicken) is a British singer, guitarist and keyboardist, originally with Joy Division and a former member of New Order. ... Peter Hooky Hook (born February 13, 1956 in Salford, Lancashire) is an English bass player. ... Stephen Morris on the cover of Low-Life This article is about the musician Stephen Morris. ... This article is about the album by Joy Division. ... Closer is a 1980 album by Joy Division. ... Still is a compilation album by Joy Division, consisting of rare songs along with a recording of their last ever performance which took place at High Hall Birmingham University on 2 May 1980. ... Substance is a 1988 Joy Division compilation, released by Factory Records. ... Warsaw was the planned debut album by the English post-punk band Joy Division. ... Permanent is a compilation by Joy Division, featuring tracks from the bands two studio albums, Unknown Pleasures and Closer, as well as other tracks previously released on the compilations Substance and Still. ... Heart and Soul is a Joy Division box set containing nearly every track the band recorded. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Les Bains Douches is a 2001 Joy Division live album released by NMC Records. ... The Peel Sessions is a collection of the two Peel Sessions recorded by Joy Division, released in September 1990. ... Joy Division The Complete BBC Recordings is a collection of the two Peel Sessions recorded by Joy Division, two songs from the BBC TV program Something Else and a live interview. ... An Ideal For Living is an EP released by Joy Division in 1978, shortly after changing their name from Warsaw. All tracks were recorded at the Penine Sound Studios, Oldham, on December 14, 1977. ... Transmission was a single by post-punk band Joy Division, released on Factory Records in 1979. ... Licht und Blindheit (German; Light and blindness in English) was a single by post-punk band Joy Division, released by Sordide Sentimental in France in 1980. ... Joy Division 7 flexi single. ... Love Will Tear Us Apart Original single sleeve Love Will Tear Us Apart is the best known song by the band Joy Division. ... Single released by Joy Division following the death of lead singer Ian Curtis. ... This is a discography of Joy Division, a Manchester, England-based post-punk group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Martin Hannett (May 31, 1948) – April 18, 1991 )), sometimes credited as Martin Zero, was an innovative record producer who helped develop Joy Division and co-founded Factory Records with Tony Wilson. ... Peter Saville (born 1955 in Manchester[1]) is an English graphic designer based in London. ... Anthony Howard Wilson (20 February 1950 – 10 August 2007) was an English record label owner, radio presenter, TV show host, nightclub manager, impresario and journalist for Granada Television and the BBC. Wilson, commonly known as Tony Wilson, was the music mogul behind some of Manchesters most successful bands. ... Rob Gretton (January 15, 1953 - May 15, 1999) was best known as the manager of the post punk bands Joy Division and New Order. ... Alan Erasmus was the co-founder of Factory Records with Tony Wilson. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Control is a black and white biopic about the late Ian Curtis (1956-1980), lead singer of the post-punk rock band Joy Division. ...

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