FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Factions in the Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party of the United States is composed of various different groups or factions. Although their interests at times conflict, they share enough in common to remain in the same party. For political parties named Republican Party in other countries, see Republican Party. ...


By and large the factions are informal and unorganized. They do not have their own organizations, newspapers, or paid memberships. Defining the views of any "faction" of any American political party is difficult.

Contents

Conservatives

"Conservative" covers most Republicans, and they can be subdivided into the following factions.


Religious Right

The term "religious right" is often used synonymously with Christian right because most of its members are fundamentalist Protestants, traditionalist Catholics, Mormons and some Orthodox Jews. The Religious Right has become a powerful force within the GOP. This faction is socially conservative, believing that religion should not be separated from governance. Its major legislative issues in recent years include efforts to criminalize abortion, opposition to legalized same-sex marriage, and discouraging some forms of taxpayer-funded embryonic stem cell research. They have supported a greater role of religious organizations in delivering welfare programs. The term Religious Right is a broad label applied by both scholars and critics to a number of political and religious movements and groups that primarily are active around conservative and right wing social issues. ... It has been suggested that Conservative Christianity be merged into this article or section. ... Fundamentalism is a movement to maintain strict adherence to founding principles. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmudic texts (The Oral Law). Various Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim expounded upon these same Talmudic texts. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional or natural law-based morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same biological sex, or gender. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... ...


Prominent Religious Right Republicans include TV personality Pat Robertson, former Attorney General John Ashcroft, U.S. Senators Rick Santorum (Pennsylvania) and Sam Brownback (Kansas), and activist Gary Bauer. The National Federation of Republican Assemblies is a Religious Right organization that operates as a faction of the Republican Party. The Christian Coalition is a Religious Right activist organization considered allied with the party. President Bush is also most identified with this faction. Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... Richard John Santorum (born May 10, 1958), commonly known as Rick Santorum, is the junior United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. ... Samuel Dale Brownback (born September 12, 1956) is a Senator from Kansas. ... Gary L. Bauer (born May 4, 1946 in Covington, Kentucky) is an American civil servant and conservative politician notable for his ties to several evangelical Christian groups and campaigns. ... The National Federation of Republican Assemblies is an organization which seeks to promote conservative principles and candidates within in the United States Republican Party. ... This article is about the organization presently operating in the United States. ...


Neoconservatives

Neoconservatives promote an interventionist foreign policy, including pre-emptive military action against designated enemy nations under certain circumstances. They are the strongest supporters of the war in Iraq to overthrow Saddam Hussein. They are willing to act unilaterally when they believe it serves American interests to do so. Those considered among the neoconservative include Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz and pundits Charles Krauthammer and David Frum. Neoconservatism is a somewhat controversial term referring to the political goals and ideology of the new conservatives (ultraconservative) in the United States. ... A foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how a particular country will interact with the other countries of the world. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954). ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is an American academic and political figure. ... To Meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... David Frum (born 1960) is a Canadian-American former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, and the author of the first insider book about the Bush presidency. ...


Social conservatives

Social conservatives believe in promoting traditional moral values and social mores to preserve and improve American society. They have been especially active in taking traditionalist positions on issues involving sexual standards and gender roles. Social conservatives, like the Religious Right, generally oppose absolute Separation of Church and State. Most oppose abortion and gay marriage. The are dubious about affirmative action, arguing it too often turns into quotas. They tend to support a strong military and are opposed to gun control. Most social conservatives oppose illegal immigration, which puts them in opposition to the business community. Social conservatives support stronger law enforcement and often disagree with the libertarians. On the issue of school vouchers the group is split between those who support the concept (believing that "big government" education is a failure) and those who oppose the concept (believing that "big government" would then have a "right" to dictate the school's, and more importantly the sponsoring church's, positions on controversial social issues). Social conservatism is a belief in traditional morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... An education voucher, commonly called a school voucher, is a certificate by which parents are given the ability to pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school to which they were assigned. ...


Fiscal conservatives

The fiscal conservatives favor large reductions in overall taxation, reduced domestic spending, personalized accounts for Social Security, and decreased regulation. Before 1930 the Northeastern pro-manufacturing factions of the GOP was strongly committed to high tariffs, but since 1945 it has been more supportive of free-market principles and treaties for open trade. Prominent fiscal conservatives include former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and activist Grover Norquist. The Club for Growth is a pro-Republican organization that endorses fiscal conservatives for office. The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through a dedicated payroll tax. ... A high tariff is a tariff meant to make foreign goods more expensive than domestic goods. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943) is an American politician who is best known as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... Grover Glenn Norquist (born October 19, 1956) is the president of the noted anti-tax lobbying group Americans for Tax Reform, and a conservative activist. ... The Club for Growth is a Reaganite section 527 political organization and an affiliated political action committee that raise money for candidates who support a pro-tax cut and limited government agenda. ...


Security Oriented

This is a mood among voters rather than an identifiable bloc of politicians. It emerged after the September 11th attacks. This group includes people who, regardless of other social or economic views, are very alarmed at threats to the USA. This current has usually been satisfied with President Bush's policies, but recently has criticised him regarding the issue of illegal immigration from Mexico. Politicians of this nature include Senator John Warner, Senator Chuck Hagel and Congressmen Peter Hoekstra. Many of these types of Republicans associate themselves with the political philosophy of Neolibertarianism. now. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American statesman and politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972-1974 and has served as a Republican senator from Virginia since 1979. ... Charles Timothy Chuck Hagel (born October 4, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from Nebraska. ... Pete Hoekstra (born October 30, 1953), American politician, is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing the 2nd District of Michigan. ... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ...


States' Rights Oriented

When Democrats hold the White House the GOP usually supported smaller government. Similar to the libertarian faction, States' rights Republicans believe in making the federal government small, keeping and giving important powers to the states, such as gun control laws, abortion laws, regulations on marriage, and mapping of voting districts. Recently, many Republicans took strong positions against States' rights with respect to the Federal Marriage Amendment, in the Terri Schiavo case, in the Kelo case regarding eminent domain, and in cases involving assisted suicide laws. States rights refers to the idea that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in the politics of the United States and constitutional law. ... Theresa Marie Terri Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005) was a woman from St. ... Holding The governmental taking of property from one private owner to give to another in furtherance of economic development constitutes a permissible public use under the Fifth Amendment. ...


Paleoconservatives

The paleoconservatives are not strongly represented in the political sphere, but are most visible in publications (e.g. The American Conservative and Chronicles) and through such think-tanks as the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. They are traditionalist with a strong distrust of a centralized federal government, and they are conservative on social issues (e.g. support for gun rights) and oppose multiculturalism, but favor a protectionist policy on international trade and isolationist foreign policy. Congressman Tom Tancredo of Colorado, one of the few national politicians in the movement, is representative in that he is actively against mass immigration. Prominent paleoconservatives, such as Pat Buchanan, have spoken against NAFTA and what they see as a neoconservative takeover of the party. Buchanan left the Republican Party after his GOP primary races in 1992 and 1996, and ran as a third-party candidate in the 2000 election. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Multiculturalism is an ideology advocating that society should consist of, or at least allow and include, distinct cultural groups, with equal status. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military and political policy with a policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image:Buchanan Pat. ... Nafta or NAFTA may refer to: an acronym for the North American Free Trade Agreement an acronym for the New Zealand Australia Free Trade Agreement the town/Tokyo of Nafta, Tunisia This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


Moderates and Liberals

Progressive Policy Council

A non-profit organization created by the republican party to supress democratic votes by producing mailers comparing the democratic candidates to the republican ones. This organization sends regular mailers in races such as Casey vs. Santorum, comparing their stand on abortion, gun control, and gay marriage.


Moderates

Moderates within the GOP tend to be, to varying degrees, fiscally conservative and socially liberal. While they often share the economic views of other Republicans - e.g. balanced budgets, lower taxes, free trade, deregulation, welfare reform - moderate Republicans differ in that they may be for some gay rights, abortion rights, environmental regulation, federal funding of education, fewer restrictions on legal immigration and illegal immigration, abolition of the death penalty, civil rights laws, legalization of drugs, stem cell research, antiwar policies, or any of the above. Deficit spending is a highly contentious issue, within this faction as well as outside of it. Some moderate Republicans criticize what they see as the Bush administration's military extravagance in foreign policy, or criticize its tax cuts. Others may support deficit spending, but feel it ought to be more directed towards social projects. Concerning foreign policy, moderates may be less interventionist than neoconservatives, or place greater value on multilateral institutions. See Republican In Name Only. Also see compassionate conservative. In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who holds an intermediate position between two extreme or radical viewpoints. ... A balanced budget embodies maintaining a net government surplus, meaning the government takes in more in taxes than in spends. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Deregulation is the process by which governments remove restrictions on business in order to (in theory) encourage the efficient operation of markets. ... Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... The morality and legality of abortion are controversial topics. ... Environmental law is a body of law which addresses the system of complex and interlocking rules which seeks to protect from destruction or development certain species or favored natural areas thought to be endangered by human encroachment. ... now. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the State as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offenses. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Compassionate conservatism is a political ideology and phrase that was invented by radio talk show host Michael Savage in 1994 and Marvin Olasky, whose book Compassionate Conservatism: What it is, What it Does, and How it Can Transform America was published in 2000. ...


Moderate Republicans include U.S. Senator Arlen Specter (Pennsylvania), Californian Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, and former Mayor of New York City Rudy Giuliani. Members of some of the other factions sometimes characterize moderates as "Republican In Name Only". The Republican Main Street Partnership is a network supporting moderate Republicans for office, while the Republican Leadership Council is similar in direction. Former New Jersey Governor Christie Todd Whitman founded the "It's My Party Too!" PAC in order to promote moderate Republicans for office. The Republican Majority for Choice is a PAC of and for pro-choice Republicans, and is often allied with the moderate branch of the party. Former U.S. Senate Majority Leader and 1996 Presidential nominee Bob Dole has supported the "Main Street" Republicans. Arlen Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born July 30, 1947 in Thal bei Graz, Steiermark, Austria) is an Austrian-born bodybuilder, actor and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Rudy Giuliani speaks to the press about New Yorks status two years after the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... RINO stands for Republican In Name Only, a disparaging term for a member of the United States Republican Party whose words and actions are thought to be too fiscally or socially liberal. ... The Republican Main Street Partnership is a group of social liberals and moderates in the United States Republican Party. ... Christine Todd Whitman Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American politician. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ... Pro-choice activists on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court, to rally for abortion rights on the anniversary of Roe v. ... Robert Joseph Bob Dole (born July 22, 1923) is best known as a former Republican United States Senate Majority Leader and Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996. ...


Log Cabin Republicans

The Log Cabin Republicans are a group of gay Republicans and other Republicans who favor gay rights. Their agenda is to remove any language against gay rights from the platforms of the party and to support the candidacies of Republicans who favor gay rights. They are at odds with the Religious Right. The Log Cabin Republicans is a federated political organization in the United States with state chapters and a national office in Washington, DC. The group consists of of gays, lesbians and bisexuals who are also supporters of the Republican Party. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also...


Liberals

In the 1930s the terms "liberal" and conservative" were introduced, to refer to supporters and opponents of the New Deal. Most Republicans were conservative opponents of the New Deal, but not all. In the Northeast were many Republicans who denounced the corruption and inefficiency of the New Deal, but supported its basic programs. Other names for liberal Republicans are Rockefeller Republican and the pejorative Republican in Name Only. The notable liberal Republicans include Fiorello LaGuardia, George Norris, Harold Stassen, Thomas E. Dewey, Nelson Rockefeller, Earl Warren and Michael Bloomberg. Historians debate whether Richard Nixon belongs to this group—his rhetoric was conservative but his policies were liberal in many areas. See also Rockefeller Republicans Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal For other uses of New Deal and The New Deal, see New Deal (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the term Rockefeller Republican refers to those members of the Republican party who hold moderate views similar to those of the late Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959 to 1973 and vice president of the United States under President Gerald Ford in the mid... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... George William Norris (July 11, 1861 - September 2, 1944) was a U.S. political figure. ... Harold Edward Stassen (April 13, 1907 – March 4, 2001) was the 25th Governor of Minnesota from 1939 to 1943 and a perennial candidate for the president of the United States. ... Thomas Dewey - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney of Alameda County, the 30th Governor of California, and the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (from 1953 to 1969). ... Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a prominent American businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of the City of New York. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... In the United States, the term Rockefeller Republican refers to those members of the Republican party who hold moderate views similar to those of the late Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959 to 1973 and vice president of the United States under President Gerald Ford in the mid...


Libertarians

See also South Park Republican Stan, Cartman and Kyle of South Park South Park Republican is a term that was circulated in a few articles and weblogs on the Internet circa 2001 and 2002, to describe what was claimed by the authors as a new wave of young adults and teenagers who hold political beliefs...


The libertarian faction of the Republican Party emphasizes free markets and minimal social controls. They oppose government social spending, regulation and taxes. They are divided with regard to gay rights, abortion, foreign policy and stem-cell research. Similar to the fiscal conservative faction, libertarian Republicans seek to privatize most govermental assets or devolve them to the states; massive reductions in overall federal taxation, and an overhaul of the current American tax system; deregulation of industries; and open international trade. Unlike many conservative Republicans, however, the libertarian Republicans tend to oppose the "War on Drugs" and criminalization of prostitution, American membership in most international alliances, restrictive immigration policies, and the foreign policies that neoconservatives espouse. During the 2004 Republican National Convention, this faction "butted heads" with the Religious Right faction over the party platform. Libertarianism is a political philosophy advocating that individuals should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they do not infringe on the same liberty of others. ... Massive mark-ups for drugs, [UK Govt report] Prevalance of drug use 1991-2002 The War on Drugs is an initiative undertaken by the United States with the assistance of participating countries, which is intended to manipulate various aspects of supply and demand for certain biologically active substances. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services for money or other kind of return. ... A foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how a particular country will interact with the other countries of the world. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... 2004 Republican National Convention Logo President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney accepted their partys nomination to run for second terms. ...


The libertarian faction is represented in the party by the Republican Liberty Caucus, which also actively courts members of the United States Libertarian Party to seek office as Republicans in order to increase the voice of libertarianism within the party. U.S. Represenative Ron Paul (Texas), the most visible member of the caucus, ran for U.S. President in 1988 on the ticket of the Libertarian Party. Late U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater is sometimes credited with being the father of this faction. Apart from Paul it has no prominent leader inside the GOP. The logo for the Republican Liberty Caucus // The Republican Liberty Caucus is a political action organization dedicated to promoting the ideals of individual rights, limited government and free enterprise within the Republican Party by: A. Promoting these ideals among Party officials and its various organizations; B. Identifying and supporting candidates... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded in 1971. ... Representative Ron Paul Ronald Ernest Ron Paul, MD (born August 20, 1935), a physician and Texas politician, is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from his states 14th Congressional District. ... Bartholomew Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) commonly known as Barry Goldwater, was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for President in the 1964 election. ...


Neolibertarians are intellectuals, especially from economics and political science, who support laissez-faire. They believe that free markets are the cure for most ills of the world. They oppose the Kyoto Protocol. Milton Friedman and Alan Greenspan are representative leaders. In domestic affairs they support lower taxes, deregulation, and personal freedoms, including ending the War on Drugs and legalizing prostitution. They generally oppose government monopolies, especially monopolistic public schools. They want charter schools or school vouchers to turn the educational world into more of a free market. The term "neoliberal" is often applied to Bill Clinton and his followers, but is never used for Republicans. The word "conservative" is used for what some political scientists call "neoliberal". Neolibertarianism is a subset of libertarianism that holds that land is just a form of capital, and that therefore concentrated ownership of land does not conflict with free market principles, so long as it is not established by force. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Milton Friedman (born July 31, 1912) is an American economist, known for his work on macroeconomics, microeconomics, economic history, statistics, and for his advocacy of laissez-faire capitalism. ... Alan Greenspan, former Fed Reserve Chairman The Honorable Alan C. Greenspan, PhD, KBE (b. ... Massive mark-ups for drugs, [UK Govt report] Prevalance of drug use 1991-2002 The War on Drugs is an initiative undertaken by the United States with the assistance of participating countries, which is intended to manipulate various aspects of supply and demand for certain biologically active substances. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services for money or other kind of return. ... In the United States, a charter school is a school that is created via a legal charter. ... An education voucher, commonly called a school voucher, is a certificate by which parents are given the ability to pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school to which they were assigned. ... The term neoliberalism is used to describe a political-economic philosophy that had major implications for government policies beginning in the 1970s – and increasingly prominent since 1980 – that de-emphasizes or rejects positive government intervention in the economy, focusing instead on achieving progress and even social justice by...


Overlap

There is often plenty of overlap between the various categories. For example, a Republican may side with the "neoconservatives" on foreign policy issues, yet also support a "religious right" social agenda and a "fiscally conservative" economic vision.


Partly because of that overlap, it is difficult to accurately claim which faction of the party currently holds the most power, though such a question is the topic of much speculation. After the 2003 Iraq War many argued the "neoconservative" wing of the party was clearly dominant, as they had been the faction the most supportive of the war. After President George W. Bush was re-elected in 2004, however, many attributed the high turnout of Republican voters who claimed to be motivated by "moral values" as a sign that the Religious Right faction of the party had gained considerable influence. For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ...


References

  • Michael Barone and Richard E. Cohen. The Almanac of American Politics, 2006 (2005) 1900 pages of minute, nonpartisan detail on every state and district and member of Congress.
  • Thomas Byrne Edsall. Building Red America: The New Conservative Coalition and the Drive For Permanent Power (2006) sophisticated analysis by liberal
  • Michael Crane. The Political Junkie Handbook: The Definitive Reference Book on Politics (2004), nonpartisan
  • Thomas Frank. What's the Matter with Kansas (2005) insightful attack by a liberal.
  • Bruce Frohnen, Jeremy Beer, and Jeffery O. Nelson, eds. American Conservatism: An Encyclopedia (2006) 980 pages of articles by 200 conservative scholars
  • Tom Hamburger and Peter Wallsten. One Party Country: The Republican Plan for Dominance in the 21st Century (2006), hostile
  • Adrian Wooldridge and John Micklethwait. The Right Nation: Conservative Power in America (2004), sophisticated nonpartisan analysis

See also

The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...

External links

  • "A Guide to the Republican Herd" New York Times Oct 5, 2006 interactive graphic
  • Belief Spectrum Brings Party Splits Washington Post October 4, 1998

  Results from FactBites:
 
Republican Party - MSN Encarta (1169 words)
Republicans controlled most elective offices in the Northern states during the war, and for a generation afterward they were able to make full use of patriotic fervor to denounce the Democrats as traitors and friends of the South.
Republican leaders argued that Whigs and fls had a common belief in the need for strong government action in society, but these arguments were ineffective in the face of racist campaigns by the Southern Democrats.
Republican state platforms frequently advocated government intervention to prohibit or limit liquor consumption and to shape school curricula in order to promote certain Protestant and American values against the threats posed by the newcomers, who became closely allied with the Democratic Party.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m