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A fable is a brief, succinct story, in prose or verse, that features animals, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature which are anthropomorphized (given human qualities), and that illustrates a moral lesson (a "moral"), which may at the end be expressed explicitly in a pithy maxim. A fable is a story intended to illustrate a moral. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... “Natural” redirects here. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... This article is about modern humans. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ... If something is explicit, it generally leaves nothing to the imagination. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


A fable differs from a parable in that the latter excludes animals, plants, inanimate objects, and forces of nature as actors that assume speech and other powers of humankind. // For a comparison of parable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ...


Usage has not always been so clearly distinguished. In the King James Version of the Bible, the translators rendered "μύθος" ("mythos") as "fable" in the New Testament,[1] in First and Second Timothy, Titus and First Peter. This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Look up Translator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The First Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, traditionally attributed to Saint Paul and part of the New Testament of the Bible. ... The Second Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, normally attributed to Saint Paul, and is part of the canonical New Testament. ... For other uses, see Titus (disambiguation). ... In Christianity, the First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. ...


Definitions

The word "fable" comes from the Latin "fabula" ("a story"), from "fari" ("to speak"). Download high resolution version (1628x1604, 1004 KB)Depiction of Aesop from the Nuremberg Chronicle. ... Download high resolution version (1628x1604, 1004 KB)Depiction of Aesop from the Nuremberg Chronicle. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... Download high resolution version (621x660, 118 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (621x660, 118 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Engraving by Étienne-Jehandier Desrochers Jean de La Fontaine (July 8, 1621 – April 13, 1695) was the most famous French fabulist and probably the most widely read French poet of the 17th century. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


Used in a pejorative sense, a "fable" may refer to a deliberately invented or falsified account. A non-authorial person who, wittingly or not, tells "tall tales", may be termed a "confabulator". In its more general sense, though, the word "fable" refers simply to a genre of short stories designed to impart a moral lesson. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with pejoration. ... Look up Liar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Tall Tale, also known as Tall Tale: The Unbelievable Adventures of Pecos Bill is a 1995 family Western movie starring Patrick Swayze, Nick Stahl, Oliver Platt, Roger Aaron Brown, Scott Glenn, Catherine OHara, and Jared Harris. ... Look up confabulation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


An author of fables is termed a fabulist, while the word "fabulous" means "pertaining to fables". A character referred to as "fabulous" (such as The Lone Ranger) simply means that he was fictional, in the traditional meaning of the word. In recent decades the word's metaphorical meanings have often been taken as literal. "Fabulous" has acquired a meaning equivalent to "outstanding". The Lone Ranger. ...


Characteristics

Fables can be described as a didactic mode of literature. That is, whether a fable is handed down from generation to generation as oral literature or constructed by a literary tale-teller, its purpose is to teach a lesson or value, or to give sage advice. Fables also provide opportunities to laugh at human folly, when they provide examples of behavior to avoid rather than to emulate. Oral literature corresponds in the sphere of the spoken (oral) word to literature as literature operates in the domain of the written word. ... A lesson is a structured period of time where learning is intended to occur. ... “Value” redirects here. ... Look up advice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Laughing Child Laughter is the biological reaction of humans to moments or occasions of humor: an outward expression of amusement. ... For other uses, see Folly (disambiguation). ...


Fables frequently have animals as their central characters, and they are often given anthropomorphic characteristics, such as the ability to speak and to reason. For instance, medieval French fabliaux might feature Reynard the fox, a trickster figure, and offer a subtext mildly subversive of the feudal order of society. The ancient Aesop, too, had presented a wide range of animals as the protagonists of his short fables, including his famous tortoise and hare who engage in a race, and the fox who rejects grapes that are out of his reach as being sour. Similarly, the 18th-century Polish fabulist Ignacy Krasicki employs animals as the title actors in his verse fable, "The Lamb and the Wolves." In the same way, he uses plants in "The Violet and the Grass." The word Animals when used alone has several possible meanings in the English language. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... The fabliau (plural fabliaux or fablieaux) is a comic, usually anonymous tale written by jongleurs in northeast France circa the 13th Century. ... Reynard the Fox, also known as Renard, Renart, Reinard, Reinecke, Reinhardus, Reynardt and by many other spelling variations, is a trickster figure whose tale is told in a number of anthropomorphic tales from medieval Europe. ... This article is about the animal. ... The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 childrens book by Michel Rodange. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Jack rabbit and Jackrabbit redirect here. ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Ignacy Krasicki. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Ignacy Krasicki. ...


Personification may also be extended to things inanimate, as in Krasicki's "Bread and Sword." An example of personified forces of nature may be found in his "The Stream and the River." Phillipp Veits Germania (1877), a personification of Germany. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Ignacy Krasicki. ... “Natural” redirects here. ... Ignacy Krasicki. ...


Divine beings may also appear in fables as active agents in human life. For instance, Aesop's Fables feature most of the Greek pantheon, including Zeus and Hermes. Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


History

The fable is one of the most enduring forms of folk literature, spread abroad, modern researchers agree[2] less by literary anthologies than by oral transmission. Fables can be found in the literature of almost every country. Fables that originated in India were carried into Persia and from there spread into Greece and the Western world from the fourth century BCE. The varying corpus denoted Aesopica or Aesop's Fables includes most of the best-known western fables, which are attributed to the legendary Aesop, supposed to have been a Greek slave of the 6th century BCE. When Babrius set down fables from the Aesopica in verse for a Hellenistic Prince "Alexander," he expressly stated at the head of Book II that this type of "myth" that Aesop had introduced to the "sons of the Hellenes" had been an invention of "Syrians" from the time of "Ninos" (personifying Nineveh to Greeks) and Belos ("ruler")[3]. Several parallel animal fables in Sumerian and Akkadian are among those that E. Ebeling introduced to modern Western readers[4]; there are comparable fables from Egypt's Middle Kingdom[5], and Hebrew fables such as the "king of trees" in Book of Judges 9 and "the thistle and the cedar tree" in II Kings 14:9.[6] Many other familiar ones include “The Crow and the Pitcher,” “The Hare and the Tortoise,” and “The Lion and the Mouse.” Image File history File links Ignacy_Krasicki_1. ... Image File history File links Ignacy_Krasicki_1. ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This file was downloaded from the site walks. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This file was downloaded from the site walks. ... Ivan Andreyevich Krylov (Иван Андреевич Крылов in Russian) (February 13, 1769 - November 21, 1844) was a famous Russian fabulist. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Abierce_1866. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Abierce_1866. ... Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – 1914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devils Dictionary. ... Folklore is the ethnographic concept of the tales, legends, or superstitions current among a particular ethnic population, a part of the oral history of a particular culture. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel. ... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... (7th century BC - 6th century BCE - 5th century BCE - other centuries) (600s BCE - 590s BCE - 580s BCE - 570s BCE - 560s BCE - 550s BCE - 540s BCE - 530s BCE - 520s BCE - 510s BCE - 500s BCE - other decades) (2nd millennium BCE - 1st millennium BCE - 1st millennium) The 5th and 6th centuries BCE were... Babrius was the author of a collection of fables written in Greek. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... Belus in Latin or Belos in accurate Greek transliteration is one of: Persons Ba‘al: a title (lord) in northwest Semitic languages, often applied to particular gods. ... Sumer (or Shumer, Sumeria, Shinar, native ki-en-gir) formed the southern part of Mesopotamia from the time of settlement by the Sumerians until the time of Babylonia. ... Akkadian (lišānum akkadÄ«tum) was a Semitic language (part of the greater Afro-Asiatic language family) spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians. ... The Middle Kingdom is: a old name for China a period in the History of Ancient Egypt, the Middle Kingdom of Egypt This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Book of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is a book of the Bible originally written in Hebrew. ... The Books of Kings (also known as [The Book of] Kings in Hebrew: Sefer Melachim מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ...


Hundreds of fables were composed in ancient India during the first millennium BC, often as stories within frame stories. These included Vishnu Sarma's Panchatantra, the Hitopadesha, Vikram and The Vampire, and Syntipas' Seven Wise Masters, which were collections of fables that were later influential throughout the Old World. Earlier Indian epics such as Vyasa's Mahabharata and Valmiki's Ramayana also contained fables within the main story, often as side stories or back-story. The History of India begins with the Indus Valley Civilization, which flourished in the north-western part of the Indian subcontinent from 3300 to 1700 BCE. This Bronze Age civilization was followed by the Iron Age Vedic period, which witnessed the rise of major kingdoms known as the Mahajanapadas. ... The 1st millennium BC encompasses the Iron Age and sees the rise of successive empires. ... A story within a story is a literary device or conceit in which one story is told during the action of another story. ... A frame story (also frame tale, frame narrative, etc. ... Vishnu Sarma was the author of the anthropomorphic political treatise called Panchatantra. ... The Panchatantra [1][2][3] (also spelled Pañcatantra, Sanskrit पञ्चतन्त्र Five Chapters) or Kelileh va Dimneh or Anvar-i-Suhayli [4][5] or The Lights of Canopus (in Persian)[6] or Kalilag and Damnag (in Syriac)[7] or Kalila and Dimna (also Kalilah and Dimnah, Arabic كليلة و دمنة Kalila wa Dimna)[8... Hitopadesha is a collection of Sanskrit fables in prose and verse; it is similar to, though distinct from, the Panchatantra. ... Baital Pachisi or Vetala Panchvimshati (Twenty five tales of Baital) or Vikram and The Vampire is a collection of tales and legends from India. ... Syntipas (the Greek form of Sindibad or Sendabar) was an Indian philosopher supposed to have lived about 100 B.C., and the reputed author of a collection of tales known generally in Europe as The Story of the Seven Wise Masters. ... The Seven Wise Masters (also called The Seven Sages or The Seven Sages of Rome) is a cycle of stories of Eastern origin. ... The Old World consists of those parts of Earth known to Europeans, Asians, and Africans before the voyages of Christopher Columbus; it includes Europe, Asia, and Africa (collectively known as Africa-Eurasia), plus surrounding islands. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa was the great sage who authored the great Hindu epic Mahabharata. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Valmiki composes the Ramayana Maharishi Valmiki (Sanskrit: वाल्मिकी, vālmikī) is the author of the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... A side story in fiction is a form of narrative that occurs alongside established stories set within a fictional universe. ... In narratology, a back-story (also back story or backstory) is the history behind the situation extant at the start of the main story. ...


Epicharmus of Kos and Phormis are reported as having been among the first to invent comic fables.[7] A painting by Jacob Philipp Hackert Epicharmus is considered to have lived within the hundred year period between c. ...


Fables had a further long tradition through the Middle Ages, and became part of European literature. During the 17th century, the French fabulist Jean de La Fontaine (1621-1695) saw the soul of the fable in the moral — a rule of behavior. Starting with the Aesopian pattern, La Fontaine set out to satirize the court, the church, the rising bourgeoisie, indeed the entire human scene of his time. La Fontaine's model was subsequently emulated by Poland's Ignacy Krasicki (1735-1801) and Russia's Ivan Krylov (1769-1844). The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Engraving by Étienne-Jehandier Desrochers Jean de La Fontaine (July 8, 1621 – April 13, 1695) was the most famous French fabulist and probably the most widely read French poet of the 17th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Ivan Andreyevich Krylov (Иван Андреевич Крылов in Russian) (February 13, 1769 - November 21, 1844) was a famous Russian fabulist. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Jan. ...


In modern times, the fable has been trivialized in children's books. Yet it has also been fully adapted to modern adult literature. For instance, James Thurber used the ancient style in his books, Fables for Our Time and The Beast in Me and Other Animals. George Orwell's Animal Farm satirizes Stalinist Communism in particular, and totalitarianism in general, in the guise of animal fable. Felix Salten's Bambi is a Bildungsroman — a story of a protagonist's coming-of-age — cast in the form of a fable. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ... Stalinism is a brand of political theory, and the political and economic system named after Joseph Stalin, who implemented it in the Soviet Union. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Totalitarianism is a term employed by some scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ... Felix Salten (September 6, 1869 – October 8, 1945) was an Austrian writer. ... Bambi is a 1942 animated feature produced by Walt Disney and originally released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. ... A bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of personal development) is a novelistic form which concentrates on the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the protagonist usually from childhood to maturity. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ...


Classic fabulists

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2147x2786, 461 KB) (Note: high resolution version from http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2147x2786, 461 KB) (Note: high resolution version from http://memory. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... Valmiki composes the Ramayana Maharishi Valmiki (Sanskrit: वाल्मिकी, vālmikÄ«) is the author of the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Veda Vyasa(Contemporary painting) Vyāsa (DevanāgarÄ«: व्यास) is a central and much revered figure in the majority of Hindu traditions. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... This is about scribe, the profession. ... Veda redirects here. ... Vaisampayana or VaiÅ›ampayana was a celebrated sage who was the original teacher of the Black Yajur-Veda. ... Veda Vyasa(Contemporary painting) Vyāsa (DevanāgarÄ«: व्यास) is a central and much revered figure in the majority of Hindu traditions. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... (7th century BC - 6th century BCE - 5th century BCE - other centuries) (600s BCE - 590s BCE - 580s BCE - 570s BCE - 560s BCE - 550s BCE - 540s BCE - 530s BCE - 520s BCE - 510s BCE - 500s BCE - other decades) (2nd millennium BCE - 1st millennium BCE - 1st millennium) The 5th and 6th centuries BCE were... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel. ... Vishnu Sarma was the author of the anthropomorphic political treatise called Panchatantra. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... The Panchatantra [1][2][3] (also spelled Pañcatantra, Sanskrit पञ्चतन्त्र Five Chapters) or Kelileh va Dimneh or Anvar-i-Suhayli [4][5] or The Lights of Canopus (in Persian)[6] or Kalilag and Damnag (in Syriac)[7] or Kalila and Dimna (also Kalilah and Dimnah, Arabic كليلة Ùˆ دمنة Kalila wa Dimna)[8... Bidpai or Pilpai is the presumed author of a collection of Hindu fables of ancient date, in extensive circulation over the East, and widely translated. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Pali (IAST: ) is a Middle Indo-Aryan dialect or prakrit. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Syntipas (the Greek form of Sindibad or Sendabar) was an Indian philosopher supposed to have lived about 100 B.C., and the reputed author of a collection of tales known generally in Europe as The Story of the Seven Wise Masters. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Story has several different meaning as outlined below. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Seven Wise Masters (also called The Seven Sages or The Seven Sages of Rome) is a cycle of stories of Eastern origin. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... Phaedrus, ¹ (15 B.C. – AD 50), Roman fabulist, was by birth a Macedonian and lived in the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius, Gaius and Claudius. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... In its strict sense a fable is a short story or folk tale embodying a moral, which may be expressed explicitly at the end as a maxim. ... Marie de France from an illuminated manuscript Marie de France (Mary of France) was a poet evidently born in France and living in England during the late 12th century. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Berechiah ha-Nakdan, (1200s CE) was a Jewish exegete, ethical writer, grammarian, and translator; his name means Berechiah the Puntuator (or grammarian), indicating his possible profession. ... This article is about grammar from a linguistic perspective. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Biernat of Lublin (Polish: Biernat z Lublina, 1465? – after 1529) was a Polish poet, fabulist and physician. ... Engraving by Étienne-Jehandier Desrochers Jean de La Fontaine (July 8, 1621 – April 13, 1695) was the most famous French fabulist and probably the most widely read French poet of the 17th century. ... John Gay John Gay (30 June 1685 - 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... Dositej Obradović Dositej (Dositheus) Dimitrije Obradović (Доситеј Обрадовић) (February 17, 1742 - 1811) was a Serbian author, writer and translator. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Félix María de Samaniego (October 12, 1745—August 1801; born and died in Laguardia, Álava) was a Spanish fabulist, educated at Valladolid. ... Tomás de Iriarte (or Yriarte) y Oropesa (Puerto de la Cruz, La Orotava, island of Tenerife, September 18, 1750 Madrid, September 17, 1791), Spanish poet . ... Ivan Andreyevich Krylov (Иван Андреевич Крылов in Russian) (February 13, 1769 - November 21, 1844) was a famous Russian fabulist. ...

Modern fabulists

Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy(Lyof, Lyoff) (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , IPA:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – 1914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devils Dictionary. ... Sholom Aleichem Sholom (Sholem) Aleichem (February 18 (O.S.) = March 2 (N.S.), 1859 - May 13, 1916) was a popular humorist and author of Yiddish literature, including novels, short stories, and plays. ... Kate Martin(February 9, 1866 - May 16, 1944) was an American writer, newspaper columnist, and playwright. ... Don Marquis (July 29, 1878 - December 29, 1937) was an American poet, artist, newspaper columnist, humorist, playwright and author; best known for creating the characters Archy and Mehitabel. Archy was a cockroach who left poems on Marquiss typewriter by jumping on the keys, and Mehitabel, a cat, was Archy... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... “Kafka” redirects here. ... Damon Runyon Damon Runyon (October 4, 1884 – December 10, 1946) was a newspaperman and writer. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist best known for his classic childrens books under the pen name Dr. Seuss, including The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and One Fish Two Fish Red... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Arnold Lobel Arnold Lobel (born May 22, 1933, died December 4, 1987) was a popular author of childrens books. ... The Caldecott Medal was designed by Rene Paul Chambellan in 1937. ... Ramsay Wood Ramsay Wood is a writer best known for his modernized compilation of the ancient animal fables derived from The Panchatantra. ... Bill Willingham (born December 1956 in Fort Belvoir, Virginia) is an American writer and artist of comic books. ...

Notable fables

The Jātaka Tales (Sanskrit जातक, and Pali) are a voluminous body of folklore and mythic literature, concerned with previous births (jāti) of the Buddha. ... The Sky is Falling may refer to: // The Sky Is Falling (fable) a fable, also known as Chicken Licken, Chicken Little or Henny Penny is an old fable about a chicken (or a hare in early versions) who believes the sky is falling. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... The Boy Who Cried Wolf, illustrated by Milo Winter in a 1919 Aesop anthology For other uses, see Cry Wolf (disambiguation). ... The Panchatantra [1][2][3] (also spelled Pañcatantra, Sanskrit पञ्चतन्त्र Five Chapters) or Kelileh va Dimneh or Anvar-i-Suhayli [4][5] or The Lights of Canopus (in Persian)[6] or Kalilag and Damnag (in Syriac)[7] or Kalila and Dimna (also Kalilah and Dimnah, Arabic كليلة و دمنة Kalila wa Dimna)[8... Vishnu Sarma was the author of the anthropomorphic political treatise called Panchatantra. ... Baital Pachisi or Vetala Panchvimshati (Twenty five tales of Baital) or Vikram and The Vampire is a collection of tales and legends from India. ... Hitopadesha is a collection of Sanskrit fables in prose and verse; it is similar to, though distinct from, the Panchatantra. ... The Seven Wise Masters (also called The Seven Sages or The Seven Sages of Rome) is a cycle of stories of Eastern origin. ... Syntipas (the Greek form of Sindibad or Sendabar) was an Indian philosopher supposed to have lived about 100 B.C., and the reputed author of a collection of tales known generally in Europe as The Story of the Seven Wise Masters. ... Ignacy Krasicki. ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... The Emperors New Clothes is a short story written by Hans Christian Andersen in 1837. ... The fable of the stone soup is about co-operation amid scarcity. ... The Little Engine that Could, also known as The Pony Engine, is a moralistic childrens story that appeared in the United States of America. ... Jonathan Livingston Seagull (ISBN 0-380-01286-3), written by Richard Bach, is a fable in novella form about a seagull learning about life and flight, and a homily about self-perfection and self-sacrifice. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about Disneys 1994 film. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ...

Notes

  1. ^ For example, in First Timothy, "... neither give heed to fables ...", and "... refuse profane and old wives' fables..." (1 Tim 1.4 and 4.4, respectively).
  2. ^ Enzyklopädie des Märchens (1977), see "Fabel", "Äsopica" etc.
  3. ^ Burkert 1992:121
  4. ^ Ebeling, Die Babylonishe Fabel und ihre Bedeutung für die Literaturgeschichte (1931).
  5. ^ E. Brunner-Traut, Altägyptische Tiergeschichte und Fabel (1970)
  6. ^ Both noted by Walter Burkert, The Orientalizing Revolution: Near Eastern Influence on Early Archaic Greek Culture (1992), p 121 note 4.
  7. ^ P.W. Buckham, p. 245

The First Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, traditionally attributed to Saint Paul and part of the New Testament of the Bible. ... Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ...

References

  • Buckham, Philip Wentworth [1827]. Theatre of the Greeks. 
  • King James Bible; New Testament (authorised).

See also

Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An apologue (from the Greek: απολογος, a statement or account) is a brief fable or allegorical story with pointed or exaggerated details, meant to serve as a pleasant vehicle for some moral doctrine or to convey some useful lesson without explicitly stating it. ... Apologia is a junior high and high school curriculum series written by Dr. Jay Wile. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Fantastique is a French term for a literary and cinematic genre that overlaps with parts of science fiction, horror and fantasy. ... A ghost story may be any piece of fiction, or drama, that includes a ghost, or simply takes as a premise the possibility of ghosts or the belief of some character(s) in them. ... // For a comparison of parable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ... Look up proverb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

External links

  • Animal Symbolism List of frequently described animals and their characteristics
  • The Dragon-Tyrant
  • Fables - Collection and guide to fables for children
  • Imaginexus A collection of interconnected stories that anyone can edit
  • Beast Fable Society An academic society focused on fables and related genres

  Results from FactBites:
 
First Impressions - Fable // Xbox /// Eurogamer (2454 words)
Much has been made of Fable's two most touted features, the morality system and character evolution, and the overall thrust of your adventure - living the full life of a hero; swords, sprogs and your character's ageing and choices in life all taken into consideration.
The good thing about this is that we got to see areas of Fable that a simple trade demo might not have given us access to, but the downside was that some of the characters were affected by cheats, which made the combat difficulty harder to judge.
Of course, Fable is an action-RPG, and no matter how good the rest of the game might end up, it would all be ruined if the combat resembled a vacuum cleaner's obituary ("It sucked").
Fable (xbx: 2004): Reviews (3663 words)
Without doubt Fable is one of the finest videogames yet that we’ve had the pleasure to play, in which your actions have a definite consequence to the progress of the game – it’s all handled so naturally, that a lot of it passes you by without noticing.
Fable is an intensely personal experience and one that’s difficult to describe to someone else – you really have to allow yourself to become immersed within the boundaries of this twee little world to fully appreciate its magic and discover what it means to you.
Fable's low points hurt the game quite a bit, especially the length of the game, which could be beaten in three days if you played it a decent amount.
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