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Encyclopedia > FN FAL
FN FAL

The original folding stock FAL 50.00
Type Service rifle
Place of origin Flag of Belgium Belgium
Service history
In service 1953—present
Used by See Production and use
Wars Vietnam War
Cambodian Civil War
Six-Day War
Portuguese Colonial War
the South African Border War
Northern Ireland Troubles
Rhodesian Bush War
Falklands War
Gulf War
Both Chechen Wars
Balkan Wars
Production history
Designer Dieudonne Saive, Ernest Vervier
Designed 1947-1953
Manufacturer Fabrique Nationale (FN)
Produced 1953—
Variants See Variants
Specifications
Weight 4.0–4.45 kg (8.8–9.8 lb)
Length 1,090 mm (43 in)
Barrel length 533 mm (21 in)

Cartridge 7.62x51mm NATO
Action Gas-operated, tilting breechblock
Rate of fire 650 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 823 m/s (2,700 ft/s)
Effective range 500 meters
Feed system 20 or 30-round detachable box magazine
Sights Aperture rear sight, hooded post front sight

The Fusil Automatique Léger (Light Automatic Rifle) or FAL is a 7.62x51 NATO self-loading, (with exceptions) selective fire rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN) during the Cold War, and adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries. It has also been adopted by many other nations for their armed forces and has proven to be a popular civilian rifle for hunting and sport shooting. The FN FAL was also produced under license in many of the adopting countries. Also because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many Western and other non-Communist countries during the Cold War, it was nicknamed "the right arm of the Free World". The service rifle (also known as standard-issue rifle) of a given army or armed force is that which it issues as standard to its soldiers. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... The Fusil Automatique Leger, or Light Automatic Rifle (LAR). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Combatants Khmer Republic, United States, Republic of Vietnam Khmer Rouge, Democratic Republic of Vietnam, National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (NLF) Strength ~250,000 FANK troops ~100,000 (60,000) Khmer Rouge Casualties ~600,000 dead, 1,000,000+ wounded[1] The Cambodian Civil War was a conflict that pitted... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Belligerents Portugal Angola (1961-74): MPLA UNITA FNLA Guinea-Bissau (1963-74): PAIGC Mozambique (1964-74): FRELIMO Strength 169,000 70,000 in Angola 42,000 in Guinea-Bissau 57,000 in Mozambique 20,000 6,500 in Angola 7,000 in Guinea-Bissau 6,500 in Mozambique Casualties and... Combatants Republic of Angola, Republic of Cuba, SWAPO, USSR, East Germany, Republic of Zambia Republic of South Africa, UNITA Scope of operations Operational Area: The South African Border War The South African Border War refers to the conflict that took place from 1966 to 1989 in South-West Africa (now... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ... Combatants Rhodesia ZANLA ZIPRA Government of Botswana Government of Tanzania Government of Zambia Mozambican Liberation Front [1] Commanders Ian Smith P. K. van der Byl Peter Walls ZANU: Robert Mugabe ZAPU: Joshua Nkomo Casualties unknown unknown Civilians killed = Around 30,000 The Rhodesian Bush War —­ as it was known at... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... There have been two Chechen Wars: First Chechen War (1994–1996) Second Chechen War (1999–) 1991-1994 In September, 1991, militants of Nationally Congress of Chechen People (NCChP) have taken control over Chechnya (they have seized republics parliament and killed chief of the PCUS of Grozny, Vitali Kutsenko). ... Belligerents Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo Liberation Army, NATO, UCPMB SFR Yugoslavia, Republic of Srpska Serbian Krajina FR Yugoslavia, Paramilitary forces from Serbia Commanders Milan Kučan Janez JanÅ¡a, Franjo TuÄ‘man, Mate Boban Janko Bobetko, Alija Izetbegović, Sefer Halilović, Hashim Thaci, Wesley Clark, Javier Solana Bill Clinton... Dieudonne Saive was a Belgian small arms designer who designed FN-49 and FN-FAL. This Belgian biographical article is a stub. ... Fabrique Nationale de Herstal, more often abbreviated as Fabrique Nationale or simply FN, is a Belgian manufacturer of firearms. ... The Fusil Automatique Leger, or Light Automatic Rifle (LAR). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 7. ... In firearms terminology, an action is the system of operation that the firearm employs to seal the breech (in a breech-loading firearm), and to load consecutive rounds. ... The gas-operated system for implementing automatic reloading of a firearm is one of five such systems, the others being recoil-operated, gatling, chain, and blowback. ... (for paintball markers also)Rate of fire is the frequency at which a specific weapon can fire or launch its projectiles. ... A guns muzzle velocity is the speed at which the projectile leaves the muzzle of the gun. ... A 30-round STANAG magazine. ... NATO 7. ... A self-loading rifle may be of two types: automatic and/or semi-automatic. ... A selective fire weapon can be fired in either of at least two modes, depending on the position of the selector switch. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... Fabrique Nationale de Herstal, more often abbreviated as Fabrique Nationale or simply FN, is a Belgian manufacturer of firearms. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... The Free World is a Cold War-era term often applied to or used by non-communist nations to describe themselves. ...

Contents

History

In 1947, the first FN FAL prototype was completed. It was designed to fire the intermediate 7.92x33mm Kurz cartridge developed and used by the forces of Nazi Germany during World War II (see StG44 assault rifle). After testing this prototype in 1948, the British Army urged FN to build additional prototypes, including one in bullpup configuration, chambered for their new .280 British calibre intermediate cartridge. After evaluating the single bullpup prototype, FN decided to return instead to their original, conventional design for future production. 7. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Sturmgewehr 44 (StG44) was an assault rifle developed in Nazi Germany during World War II and was the first of its kind to see major deployment. ... An AKM, a commonly-used assault rifle designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov An assault rifle is a selective fire rifle or carbine firing ammunition with muzzle energies intermediate between those typical of pistol and battle rifle ammunition. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... For the air to surface missile, see AGM-12 Bullpup Bullpup designs like the QBZ-95 have the magazine behind the trigger mechanism. ...


In 1950, the United Kingdom presented the redesigned FN rifle and the British EM-2, both in .280 British calibre, to the United States for comparison testing against the favored United States Army design of the time - Earle Harvey's T25. It was hoped that a common cartridge and rifle could be standardized for issue to the armies of all NATO member countries. After this testing was completed, U.S. Army officials suggested that FN should redesign their rifle to fire the U.S. prototype '.30 Light Rifle' cartridge. FN decided to hedge their bets and cast their lot with the U.S., given that the UK appeared to be favoring their own EM-2. The EM-2 rifle or Janson rifle was an early experimental British assault rifle. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ...

Modern Para-style FN FAL
Modern Para-style FN FAL

In 1951, FN even made a deal with the U.S. that they could produce the FAL royalty-free in the U.S. This decision appeared to be correct when the British unilaterally decided to adopt the EM-2 and .280 British cartridge in the very same month. This decision was later rescinded after the Labour Party was ousted from control of Parliament and Winston Churchill returned as Prime Minister. It is believed that there was a quid-pro-quo agreement between Churchill and U.S. President Harry Truman in 1952 that the British accept the .30 Light Rifle cartridge as NATO standard in return for U.S. acceptance of the FN FAL as NATO standard. The .30 Light Rifle cartridge was in fact later standardized as the 7.62 mm NATO; however, the U.S. insisted on continued rifle tests. The FAL chambered for the .30 Light Rifle went up against the redesigned T25 (now redesignated as the T47), and an M1 Garand variant, the T44. Eventually, the T44 won out, becoming the M14. However, in the mean time, most other NATO countries were evaluating and selecting the FAL. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Churchill redirects here. ... For the victim of Mt. ...


FN created what is possibly the classic post-war battle rifle. Formally introduced by its designers Dieudonne Saive and Ernest Vervier in 1951, and produced two years later, it has been described as the "right arm of the Free World." The FAL battle rifle has its Warsaw Pact counterpart in the AK-47, each being fielded by dozens of countries and produced in many of them. A few, such as Israel and South Africa, manufactured and issued both designs at various times. Unlike the Russian AK-47 assault rifle, the FAL utilized a heavier full-power rifle cartridge. In the West, FAL's primary competitor was the German Heckler & Koch G3. The FN FAL battle rifle The term battle rifle can have different meanings. ... -1... Avtomat Kalashnikova model 1947 g. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... Rimmed, centerfire . ... The G3 is a 7. ...


Design

The FAL operates by means of a gas-operated action very similar to that of the Russian SVT-40. The gas system is driven by a short-stroke, spring-loaded piston housed above the barrel, and the locking mechanism is what is known as a tilting breechblock. To lock, it drops down into a solid shoulder of metal in the heavy receiver like the bolts of the Russian SKS carbine and French MAS-49 series of semi-automatic rifles. The gas system is fitted with a gas regulator behind the front sight base, allowing adjustment of the gas system in response to environmental conditions, and can be closed completely to allow for the firing of rifle grenades. The FAL's magazine capacity ranges from 5 to 30 rounds, with most magazines holding 20 rounds. In fixed stock versions of the FAL, the recoil spring is housed in the stock, while in folding-stock versions it is housed in the receiver cover, necessitating a slightly different receiver cover, recoil spring, and bolt carrier.[1] The gas-operated system for implementing automatic reloading of a firearm is one of five such systems, the others being recoil-operated, gatling, chain, and blowback. ... In firearms terminology, an action is the system of operation that the firearm employs to seal the breech (in a breech-loading firearm), and to load consecutive rounds. ... The Samozaryadnaya Vintovka Tokareva 40 is a Soviet semi-automatic rifle, which saw widespread service in World War II. It was the first self-loading battle rifle which was issued to service in large numbers. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In firearms terminology, the receiver is the part of the firearm that houses the operating parts of the gun. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The SKS is a Russian semi-automatic carbine, designed in 1945 by Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov. ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... The MAS 49 is a French designed semiautomatic rifle that was intended to replace the motley collection of aging French bolt-action rifles and captured German rifles after the end of WWII. The MAS (which stands for Manufacture dArmes St. ... A rifle grenade is a form of grenade that utilizes a rifle as a launch mechanism to increase the effective range of the grenade. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An early naval cannon design, allowing the gun to roll backwards a small distance when firing The recoil when firing a gun is the backward momentum of a gun, which is equal to the forward momentum of the bullet or shell, due to conservation of momentum. ...


FAL rifles have also been manufactured in both light and heavy-barrel configurations, the heavy barrel intended for automatic fire. Most heavy barreled FALs are equipped with bipods, although some light barrel models were equipped with bipods. A bipod is a support device that is similar to a tripod or monopod, but with only two legs. ...


Despite using a full-power .30 cartridge, the FAL's recoil is relatively light. This is due mainly to the rifle's weight, but also to its gas-operated design. In fully-automatic mode, however, the shooter receives considerable abuse from recoil, and the weapon climbs off-target quickly. Most military forces adopting the FAL eventually eliminated full-automatic firearms training in the light-barrel FAL.


Production and use

A Uruguayan tactical air controller visible here with an Argentinian FAL.

The FAL was made by Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN) in Liège, Belgium and under license in a number of countries, including the United Kingdom (as the L1A1 Self Loading Rifle or SLR), South Africa (where it was known as the R1), Brazil, Australia, Canada, Israel, Austria and Argentina. Mexico assembled FN-made components into complete rifles at its national arsenal in Mexico City. The FAL was also exported to many other countries, such as Venezuela, where a small-arms industry produces some basically unchanged variants, as well as ammunition. By modern standards, one disadvantage of the FAL is the amount of work which goes into machining the complex bolt and bolt carrier. Additionally, the movement of the tilting bolt mechanism tends to return differently with each shot, affecting inherent accuracy of the weapon. The FAL's receiver is normally machined, whilst most other modern military rifles use quicker stamping or casting techniques. Modern FALs have many improvements over those produced by FN and others in the mid-20th-century (for comparison, see a photo of a modern Para-style FAL). Fabrique Nationale de Herstal, more often abbreviated as Fabrique Nationale or simply FN, is a Belgian manufacturer of firearms. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ...


While no production numbers are known, it is estimated that FAL production (in all of its variants) has exceeded 1,000,000 units.


Flag of Argentina Argentina

The Argentine Armed Forces officially adopted the FN FAL in 1955, but the first FN made examples did not arrive in Argentina until the autumn of 1958. Subsequently, in 1960, licensed production of FALs began and continued until the mid to late 1990s, when production ceased. Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ...


Argentine FALs were produced by the government-owned arsenal FM (Fabricaciones Militares) at the Fabrica Militar de Armas Portatiles "Domingo Matheu" (FMAP "DM")in Fray Luis Beltrán, located a few miles north of Rosario. The acronym "FAL" was kept, its translation being "Fusil Automatico Liviano", (Light Automatic Rifle). Production weapons included "Standard" and "Para" (folding buttstock) versions. Military rifles were produced with the full auto fire option. The rifles were usually known as the FM FAL, for the "Fabricaciones Militares" brand name. (FN and FM have a long standing licensing and manufacturing agreement.) A heavy barrel version, known as the FAP (Fusil Automatico Pesado, or heavy automatic rifle) was also produced for the armed forces, to be used as a squad automatic weapon. The Argentine 'heavy barrel' FAL, also used by several other nations, was found to frequently experience a failure to feed after firing two rounds from a full magazine when in automatic mode.


An FAL offspring chambering the 5.56x45mm NATO cartridge was developed in the early 1980s; it was dubbed the FARA 83 (Fusil Automatico Republica Argentina). The design borrowed features from the FAL such as the gas system and folding stock. It seems to have been also influenced to some degree by other Western rifles (the Beretta AR70/223, M16, and the Galil). An estimated quantity of between 2,500 and 3,000 examples were produced for field testing, but military spending cuts killed the project in the mid 1980s. U.S. Military 5. ... The FARA 83, Argentine Republic Automatic Rifle (Spanish: Fusíl Automático República Argentina) or FAA 81, Argentine Automatic Rifle (Spanish: Fusil Automático Argentino) was a rifle locally designed and developed for the Argentine Army in the 1980s. ...


There was also a semi-automatic–only version, the FSL, intended for the civilian market. Legislation changes in 1995 (namely, the enactment of Presidential Decree Nº 64/95) imposed a de facto ban on "semi-automatic assault weapons". Today, it can take up to two years to obtain a permit for the ownership of an FSL. The FSL was offered with full or folding stocks, plastic furniture and orthoptic sights. De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


Argentine FALs saw action during the Falklands War (Falklands-Malvinas/South Atlantic War), and in different peace-keeping operations such as in Cyprus and the former Yugoslavia. Rosario-made FALs are known to have been exported to Bolivia (in 1971), Colombia, Croatia (during the wars in former Yugoslavia during the 1990s), Honduras, Nigeria (this is unconfirmed, most Nigerian FALs are from FN in Belgium or are British-made L1A1s), Peru, and Uruguay (which reportedly took delivery of some Brazilian IMBEL-made FALs as well). Deactivated ex-Argentinian FALs are used by UK forces as part of the soldier's load on some training courses run over public land in the UK. Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner...


The Argentine Marine Corps, a branch of the Argentine Navy, has replaced the FN/FM FAL in front line units, adopting the U.S. M16A2. The Argentine Army has expressed its desire to acquire at least 1,500 new rifles chambered for the 5.56x45mm NATO SS109/U.S. M855 (.223 Remington) cartridge, to be used primarily by its peacekeeping troops on overseas deployments.

Soldiers from the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) act as the opposing force (OPFOR) and fire their FN FALs during the Tradewinds 2002 Field Training Exercise (FTX), on the island of Antigua.
Soldiers from the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) act as the opposing force (OPFOR) and fire their FN FALs during the Tradewinds 2002 Field Training Exercise (FTX), on the island of Antigua.

Badge of the JDF Roundel of Jamaica Defence Force Air Wing The Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) is the overall name given to the combined armed forces of Jamaica. ...

Flag of Australia Australia

The Australian Army, as a late member of the allied rifle committee along with the United Kingdom and Canada adopted the committee's improved version of the FAL rifle, designated the L1A1 rifle by Australia and Great Britain, and the C1 by Canada. The Australian L1A1 is also known as the Self-Loading Rifle (SLR), and in full auto form, the Automatic Rifle (AR). The Australian L1A1 features are almost identical to the British L1A1 version of FAL, however the Australian L1A1 differs from its British counterpart in the design of the Main Body (Upper Receiver) lightening cuts. The lightening cuts of the Australian L1A1 most closely duplicate the later Canadian C1 pattern, rather than the simplified and markedly unique British L1A1 cuts. The Australian L1A1 FAL rifle was in service with Australian forces until it was supplanted by the F88 Austeyr in 1988. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Australians, in co-ordination with Canada, developed a heavy-barrelled version of the L1A1 as an Automatic Rifle variant, designated L2A1. The Australian heavy-barrelled L2A1 was also known as the Automatic Rifle (AR). The L2A1 was similar to the FN FAL 50.41/42, but with a unique combined bipod, hand-guard and receiver/dust-cover mounted tangent rear sight. This L2A1 was intended to serve a role as a light automatic rifle or quasi-Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW). The role of the L2A1 is essentially the same in concept as the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) or Bren. The L2A1 often was considered a replacement for the BAR or Bren, although in practice many considered the L2A1 inferior to the BAR or Bren. It is noteworthy that most countries that adopted the FAL rejected the Heavy Barrel FAL, presumably because its "in-between" role served a need that really did not exist; and that it did not perform well as either a light rifle, or a SAW. Countries that did embrace the Heavy Barrel FAL included Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, and Israel. The Browning Automatic Rifle (more formally designated first as the Rifle, Caliber . ... The Bren (from Brno (the Czechoslovakian town of design) and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of squad automatic weapon/light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles into the 1980s. ...


Unique 30 round magazines were developed for the L2A1 rifles. These 30-round magazines were essentially a lengthened version of the standard 20-round L1A1 magazines, perfectly straight in design. Curved 30-round L4A1 magazines from the 7.62 NATO caliber Bren Gun are interchangeable with the 30-round L2A1 magazines, however they reputedly have feeding difficulties due to the additional friction from the curved design as they must be inserted "upside down" in the L2A1 FAL. The L4A1 Bren magazines were developed as a top-mounted gravity-assisted feed magazine, opposite of what is required for the L2A1 FAL. Regardless of these shortcomings, the L4A1 magazines are popularly used in FAL rifles of all types. (The large front locking lug of inch pattern Commonwealth magazines is easily modified with a hand file to allow it to fit and function in FALs with metric receivers.)


The Australian L1A1/L2A1 rifles were produced by the Small Arms Factory, Lithgow, with approximately 220,000 L1A1 rifles produced between 1959 and 1986. L2A1 production was approximately 10,000 rifles produced between 1962 and 1982. Lithgow exported a large number of L1A1 rifles to many countries in the region. Notable users were New Zealand, Singapore, and Papua New Guinea.


Many Australian soldiers used the SLR rifle during the Vietnam War. Many Australian soldiers preferred the larger calibre weapon over the American M16 because they felt they could trust the NATO 7.62 round to kill an enemy soldier outright. Australian jungle warfare tactics during the Vietnam War were far more conservative than those employed by U.S. troops, and often determined by the strengths and limitations of the SLR and its heavy ammunition load. The SLR was semi-automatic only, unless battlefield modifications were made. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... M16 (more formally Rifle, Caliber 5. ...


Another interesting product of Australian participation in the conflict in South-East Asia was the field modification of L1A1 and L2A1 rifles by the Australian Special Air Service Regiment SASR for better handling. Nicknamed "The Bitch". These rifles were field modified, often from heavy barrelled L2A1 automatic rifles, with their barrels cut off immediately in front of the gas block, and often with the L2A1 bipods removed and a XM148 40 mm grenade launcher mounted below the barrel. The XM148 40 mm grenade launchers were obtained from U.S. forces. For the L1A1, the lack of fully-automatic fire resulted in the unofficial conversion of the L1A1 to full-auto capability by simply filing down the selector. The Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) is a Special Forces regiment modelled on the original British SAS and also drawing on the traditions of the Australian World War II Z Special Force commando unit, as well as the Independent Companies which were active in the South Pacific during the same... The XM148 was an experimental 40 mm grenade launcher developed by Colt Firearms as the CGL-4 (Colt Grenade Launcher). ...


Flag of Austria Austria

After evaluating both the Spanish CETME and American Armalite AR-10, the Austrian Army adopted a variant of the FAL under the designation Sturmgewehr 58 (Stg. 58) until it was replaced with the Steyr AUG. Produced locally by Steyr Mannlicher, the Stg. 58 was outwardly similar to the German G1, among others, featuring the same slimmer horizontally-ribbed handguard, and a similar flash suppressor. Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... The name CETME is an acronym for Centro de Estudios Técnicos de Materiales Especiales, a Spanish government design and development establishment. ... Portuguese paratroopers, armed with AR-10 rifles, jump from a helicopter in Angola War in the 1960s The AR-10 is a lightweight, air-cooled, magazine-fed, gas operated, select-fire rifle that fires 7. ... The AUG is an Austrian 5. ... The Austrian firm Steyr-Mannlicher is a firearms manufacturer based in the city of Steyr. ... Close-up of the flash suppressor on a Sig 550. ...


Flag of Belgium Belgium

Belgium was the first country to adopt both the FAL and FALO for its armed forces in the 1950s. Both rifles were kept in service until the FN FNC was introduced into combat units in the late 1980s. The FAL finally disappeared from inventory around 1995. Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ...


Flag of Brazil Brazil

Brazil took delivery of a small quantity of FN-made FAL rifles for evaluation as early as 1954. Troop field testing was performed with FN made FALs between 1958 and 1962. Then, in 1964, Brazil officially adopted the rifle, designating the rifle M964 for 1964. Licensed production started shortly thereafter at the Indústria de Material Bélico do Brasil, or IMBEL, in Itajubá in the state of Minas Gerais. The folding stock version was designated M969A1. By the late 1980s/ early 1990s, IMBEL had manufactured some 200,000 M964 rifles. Brazilian made FALs are characterized by their simple, unmilled receivers, a feature which simplifies production and lowers cost. Early FN made FALs for Brazil are typical FN 1964 models with Type 1 or Type 2 receivers, plastic stock, handguard, and pistol grip, 22 mm cylindrical flashhider for grenade launching, and plastic model "D" carrying handle. Brazilian-made FALs are thought to have been exported to Uruguay. A heavy barrel version, known as the FAP (Fuzil Automático Pesado, or heavy automatic rifle) was also produced for the armed forces, to be used as a squad automatic weapon. Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Itajubá is a town in Minas Gerais, Brazil. ... Capital (and largest city) Belo Horizonte Demonym Mineiro Government  -  Governor Aécio Neves  -  Vice Governor Antônio Augusto Junho Anastasia Area  -  Total 588,528. ...

Main article: IMBEL MD2

Brazil also makes its own FAL variants, known as the MD-2 and MD-3 assault rifles, manufactured by IMBEL. The first prototype, the MD-1, came out around 1983. In 1985, the MD-2 was presented and adopted by the Brazilian Armed Forces. The MD-2/MD-3 is still very similar to the FAL, minor changes include a change in the locking system, which was replaced by an M16-type rotating bolt, and different chambering, for use with the 5.56x45mm NATO cartridge. The MD-2 and MD-3 use M16-compatible magazines, but both versions differ from each other in the buttstock. The MD-2 features a side-folding stock, the MD-3 uses the same fixed polymer stock of the FAL. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article needs translation. ...


IMBEL also produced a semi-automatic version of the FAL for Springfield Armory, Inc. (not to be confused with the US military Springfield Armory), which was marketed in the US as the SAR-48 and SAR-4800, starting in the mid-1980s. IMBEL-made receivers have been much in demand among American gunsmiths building FALs from "parts kits." Springfield Armory, Inc. ...


Flag of Cambodia Cambodia

Used by the Khmer Republic during the Cambodian Civil War since 1967-1975s and also used by the Royal Cambodian Army. Image File history File links Flag_of_Cambodia. ... Insurrection and War, 1967-75 By the mid-1960s, Norodom Sihanouks delicate balancing act was beginning to go awry. ... Combatants Khmer Republic, United States, Republic of Vietnam Khmer Rouge, Democratic Republic of Vietnam, National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (NLF) Strength ~250,000 FANK troops ~100,000 (60,000) Khmer Rouge Casualties ~600,000 dead, 1,000,000+ wounded[1] The Cambodian Civil War was a conflict that pitted... The Royal Cambodian Army is a part of the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces. ...


Flag of Canada Canada

The C1A1.
The C1A1.
Canadian soldier with C2 light machine gun. The C2 is the Canadian version of the FN FAL, with a heavier barrel than the regular FN FAL and C1.
Canadian soldier with C2 light machine gun. The C2 is the Canadian version of the FN FAL, with a heavier barrel than the regular FN FAL and C1.

The Canadian Forces operated a number of versions, the most common being the FN C1A1, similar to the British L1A1 (which became more or less a Commonwealth standard), under license by the Canadian Arsenal Limited company.[2] Canada was the first country to use the FAL. The C1 and C1A1 used a folding disk rear sight with ranges from 200 to 600 yards. It served as Canada's standard battle rifle from the early 1950s to 1984, when it began to be phased out in favour of the lighter Diemaco C7. The Canadians also operated an automatic variant as a section support weapon, similar to the FN FAL 50.41/42, but with a larger bipod and no handguard, under the designation FN C2A1. The C2A1 used a folding disk rear sight with ranges from 200 to 1000 meters. The C1 was equipped with a 20-round magazine and the C2 with a 30-round magazine, although the two were interchangeable. Variants of the initial FN C1 and the product improved C1A1 were also made for the Royal Canadian Navy, which was capable of automatic fire, under the designations C1D and C1A1D.[3] These weapons are identifiable by a "A" for automatic, carved or stamped into the buttstock. These models were used by boarding parties for domestic and international searches. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The C7 is a variation of the M16 rifle that is manufactured by Diemaco, a subsidiary of Colt Firearms, and used by the Canadian Forces, Hærens Jegerkommando (Norway), Military of Denmark (all branches) and the Royal Netherlands Army as its main infantry weapon. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ...


Flag of Croatia Croatia

Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ...

Flag of Germany Germany

The first German FALs were from an order placed in late 1955/early 1956, for several thousand FN FAL so-called "Canada" models with wood furniture and the prong flashhider. These weapons were intended for the Bundesgrenzschutz (border guard) and not the nascent Bundeswehr (army), which at the time used M1 Garands and M1/M2 carbines. In November 1956, however, West Germany ordered 100,000 additional FALs, designated the G1, for the army. FN made the rifles between April 1957 and May 1958. G1s served in the West German Bundeswehr for a relatively short time in the late 1950s and early 1960s, before they were replaced by the Spanish CETME Modelo 58 rifle in 1959 (which was extensively reworked into the later G3 rifle). The G1 featured a pressed metal handguard identical to the ones later used on the Austrian Stg. 58, as well as the Dutch and Greek FALs, this being slightly slimmer than the standard wood or plastic handguards, and featuring horizontal lines running almost their entire length. G1s were also fitted with a unique removable prong flash hider, adding another external distinction. It has been alleged that the main reason for the replacement of the G1 in Germany centred around existing bitterness stemming from World War II and the refusal of the Belgians to grant a license for production of the weapon in Germany. Many G1 FALs were passed on to Turkey after their withdrawal from German service. Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Badge of the BPOL The Bundespolizei (BPOL) is the (primarily) uniformed federal police force of Germany. ... The Bundeswehr (German for Federal Defence Force;  ) is the name of the unified armed forces of the Federal Republic of Germany and their civil administration and procurement authorities. ... The name CETME is an acronym for Centro de Estudios Técnicos de Materiales Especiales, a Spanish government design and development establishment. ... The G3 is a 7. ...


Flag of Greece Greece

Adopted the FAL and FALO under license by the Pyrkal factories before using Elliniki Biomihania Oplon-made G3A3s. This move was due to lack of support by the Greek government on Pyrkal. It was in use with the Greek special forces and the 4th Army Corps in the Evros region from 1973 to 1999. From 2000, the FAL was replaced by the M16A2 and M4 series in special forces. At this time, the use of the FAL is reserved to the Greek national guard, Police and Coast Guard. Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... EBO (Standing for Elliniki Biomihania Oplon, or Hellenic Arms Industry) has been the main arms manufacturer of Greece. ...


Flag of India India

Designated the 1A SLR (Self Loading Rifle), Indian-made FALs were roughly based on the British L1A1, but the measurements match neither the FN nor the British made weapons. It was the mainstay rifle of the Indian Army for almost 45 years, and first saw combat use during the 1965 war with Pakistan. The variant manufactured in India is restricted to semi-automatic fire. The INSAS is part of a family of rifles, carbines and light machine guns - partially derived from the SLR, but in 5.56 mm - that has replaced the SLR in the military. Considerable number of SLRs continued to be used by paramilitary, constabulary and police forces of India. Indian 1A SLRs have been provided to Nepal. Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon, one of the most popular modern 5. ...


Flag of Israel Israel

After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) had to overcome several logistical problems (the supply of ammunition, repairs, spare parts and so on), which were a result of the wide variety of old firearms that were in service. In 1955 the IDF adopted the IMI-produced Uzi submachine gun. The Uzi was a superb automatic weapon, but it had one major drawback: relatively short range. In order to compensate, the IDF decided in the same year to adopt the FN FAL as its standard-issue infantry rifle, under the name Romat (רומ"ט), an abbreviation of "self-loading rifle". The FAL version ordered by the IDF came in two basic variants, both regular and heavy-barrel (automatic rifle), and were chambered for 7.62 mm NATO ammunition. The Israeli 'heavy barrel' FAL, also used by several other nations, was found to frequently experience a failure to feed after firing two rounds from a full magazine when in automatic mode. The Israeli FALs were originally produced as selective-fire rifles, though later light-barrel rifle versions were altered to semi-automatic fire only. Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen[2], Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... IMI logo Israel Military Industries Ltd. ... Look up uzi in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Israeli FAL first saw action in relatively small quantities during the Suez Crisis of 1956, and by the Six-Day War in June 1967, it was the standard Israeli rifle. During the Yom Kippur War of October 1973 it was still in front-line service as the standard Israeli rifle, though increasing criticism eventually led to the phaseout of the weapon. Israeli forces were primarily mechanized in nature, and the long length and heavy weight of the FAL slowed deployment drills and proved exceedingly difficult to handle within the confines of a vehicle. Additionally, Israeli forces experienced repeated jamming of the FAL due to heavy sand ingress in the Middle Eastern deserts, requiring repeated field-stripping and cleaning of the rifle, sometimes while under fire. This problem was easily corrected by cutting slits in the bolt carrier to allow sand to fall through. The rifle was eventually replaced by the Galil chambered in either 5.56x45 or 7.62 NATO. Belligerents Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties and losses 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 1650... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Combatants  Israel  Egypt,  Syria,  Iraq Commanders Moshe Dayan, David Elazar, Ariel Sharon, Shmuel Gonen, Benjamin Peled, Israel Tal, Rehavam Zeevi, Aharon Yariv, Yitzhak Hofi, Rafael Eitan, Abraham Adan, Yanush Ben Gal Saad El Shazly, Ahmad Ismail Ali, Hosni Mubarak, Mohammed Aly Fahmy, Anwar Sadat, Abdel Ghani el-Gammasy, Abdul Munim...


Flag of Ireland Ireland

The Irish Defence Forces used it as the main rifle from the 1960s till 1988 where it was replaced by the Steyr AUG for use by Permanent Defence Forces, however it was not until 2000/2001 that the FN FAL was retired by the Reserve Forces. The last examples were removed from the armouries in late 2004. Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... The Irish Defence Forces encompass the army, navy, air force and reserve forces of the Republic of Ireland. ... The AUG is an Austrian 5. ...


Flag of Malaysia Malaysia

The Malaysian Army adopted the L1A1 SLR rifle from the British Commonwealth circa 1970 to replace the elderly bolt action rifle Lee Enfield and Sten submachinegun. It was also adopted by Royal Malaysian Police for its Paramilitary Field Force (Polis Hutan/GOF). Communist Party of Malaya cadres had been found with the FN FAL as well, most of them looted from dead or wounded Malaysian soldiers. This rifle was used until in the 1990s with the adoption of the HK 33 and M16A1 rifles before FALs were withdrawn from service and transferred to second line user (Rejimen Askar Wataniah/ Territorial Army). Many Malaysian Army veterans said it was one of the finest battle rifles, rugged and easy to maintain as they found the 7.62x51 NATO caliber to be effective in combat with Communist Party of Malaya cadres armed with Type 56 assault rifles and older weapons like the Lee Enfield. Image File history File links Flag_of_Malaysia. ... Crest of Malaysian Army The Malaysian Army (Malay: Tentera Darat Malaysia) is the land component of the Malaysian Armed Forces. ... The Lee-Enfield was, in various marks and models, the British Armys standard bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle for over 60 years from (officially) 1895[3] until 1957,[4] although it remained in British service well into the early 1960s and is still found in service in the... This article is about the submachine gun. ... Kuala Lumpur Police Headquarters The Royal Malaysia Police, or Polis Diraja Malaysia (PDRM) in Malay, is a main branch of security forces in Malaysia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Communist Party of Malaya (CnoPM), also known as the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) until the 1960s was founded in Singapore in 1930 with a predominantly Chinese membership, carrying out armed resistance to the Japanese during World War II. From 1948 to 1960, its military arm, the Malayan Peoples Liberation Army... This article is about an automatic rifle. ... M16 is also the Eagle Nebula in astronomy. ... Cap badge of Rejimen Askar Wataniah The Rejimen Askar Wataniah is the reserve component of the Malaysian Army. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal and Volunteer reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces branch of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at a similar rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... Crest of Malaysian Army The Malaysian Army (Malay: Tentera Darat Malaysia) is the land component of the Malaysian Armed Forces. ... Communist Party of Malaya (CnoPM), also known as the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) until the 1960s was founded in Singapore in 1930 with a predominantly Chinese membership, carrying out armed resistance to the Japanese during World War II. From 1948 to 1960, its military arm, the Malayan Peoples Liberation Army... The Type 56 assault rifle is a Chinese copy of the Kalashnikov AK-47, which has been manufactured since 1956. ... The Lee-Enfield was, in various marks and models, the British Armys standard bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle for over 60 years from (officially) 1895[3] until 1957,[4] although it remained in British service well into the early 1960s and is still found in service in the...

A female soldier of Rejimen Askar Wataniah with a L1A1 SLR, circa 1990s

Cap badge of Rejimen Askar Wataniah The Rejimen Askar Wataniah is the reserve component of the Malaysian Army. ...

Flag of the Netherlands Netherlands

Nigerian troops in Somalia with an FAL.
Nigerian troops in Somalia with an FAL.

The Royal Netherlands Army adopted the Belgian rifle with bipod but without fully-automatic capability in 1961, being called Het licht automatisch geweer in Dutch service. They had unique sights (hooded at the front) and the German style front handguard. A sniper version, Het scherpschuttersgeweer, also existed and was standard with a scope of Dutch origin produced by the Artillerie Inrichtingen. The scope was introduced as Kijker Richt Recht AI 62. The heavy-barrel FAL 50.42 version was also adopted later as a squad automatic weapon as the Het zwaar automatisch geweer.[4] This rifle was replaced in the 1990s by the Diemaco C7. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... The Federal Republic of Nigeria is a country in West Africa and, by far, the most populated nation in Africa. ... The Royal Netherlands Army (Koninklijke Landmacht) is the land forces element of the military of the Netherlands. ... The C7 is a variation of the M16 rifle that is manufactured by Diemaco, a subsidiary of Colt Firearms, and used by the Canadian Forces, Hærens Jegerkommando (Norway), Military of Denmark (all branches) and the Royal Netherlands Army as its main infantry weapon. ...


Flag of New Zealand New Zealand

The New Zealand Army used the L1A1 Rifle (see United Kingdom below) as its standard battle rifle for just under 30 years. The Labour government of Walter Nash approved the purchase of the L1A1 as a replacement for the No. 4 Mk 1 Lee-Enfield bolt-action rifle in September 1958. An order for a total of 15,000 L1A1 rifles was subsequently placed with the Lithgow Arsenal in Australia which had been granted a license to produce the L1A1. However the first batch of 500 rifles from this order was not actually delivered to the New Zealand Army until 1960. Thereafter deliveries continued at an increasing pace until the order for all 15,000 rifles was completed in 1965. After its adoption by the Army, the Royal New Zealand Air Force and the Royal New Zealand Navy also eventually acquired it. The New Zealand Defence Force began replacing the L1A1 Rifle with the Austrian made F88 Austeyr assault rifle in 1989. The F88 Austeyr is currently in use across all three services of the New Zealand Defence Force. Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... The New Zealand Defence Force consists of three branches: the New Zealand Army; the Royal New Zealand Navy; and the Royal New Zealand Air Force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An AKM, a commonly-used assault rifle designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov An assault rifle is a selective fire rifle or carbine firing ammunition with muzzle energies intermediate between those typical of pistol and battle rifle ammunition. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New Zealand Defence Force consists of three branches: the New Zealand Army; the Royal New Zealand Navy; and the Royal New Zealand Air Force. ...


Flag of Portugal Portugal

Though Portugal had adopted the CETME (later, G3) rifle as its primary infantry weapon, the country had a long history of issuing substitute standard weapons to its elite combat units, including the use of the AR-10 by Portuguese paratroops. During Portugal's conflict with guerilla forces in its colonies of Angola and Mozambique, Portugal issued quantities of light-barrel FN FAL rifles to several of its elite infantry and commando forces, including the Companhias de Caçadores Especiais (Special Hunter, or Ranger) companies. The latter often expressed a preference for the FN FAL over the G3 when deployed for ambush and patrol actions. In this country the FN FAL was designated Espingarda Automática 7,62 mm FN m/62. Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... The G3 is a 7. ... Portuguese paratroopers, armed with AR-10 rifles, jump from a helicopter in Angola War in the 1960s The AR-10 is a lightweight, air-cooled, magazine-fed, gas operated, select-fire rifle that fires 7. ...


Flag of Rhodesia Rhodesia

Rhodesian soldiers on patrol with FAL rifles during the 1970s.
Rhodesian soldiers on patrol with FAL rifles during the 1970s.

Like most British colonies and Commonwealth Nations of the time, the colony of Southern Rhodesia's military forces were issued the British Semi-automatic version of the FAL, the L1A1. However after the declaration of independence from Great Britain in 1965, the new country of Rhodesia was unable to obtain L1A1 SLRs in any number. To make up for this shortage, large numbers of South African R1 rifles were imported from that country. These two rifles would be the primary infantry small arm of the Rhodesian Security Forces during the Rhodesian Bush War of 1965-80. Unfortunately, the international arms export embargo on Rhodesia and the eventual loss of support by the South African government meant that the supply of FALs would dry up. To make up for this shortage of arms, in the final years of the war large numbers of G3 rifles were imported from Portugal. The FAL, however, remained far more popular with the Rhodesian "Troopie" and G3s were generally restricted to police, Guard Force, and other paramilitary units. Image File history File links Flag of Rhodesia, 1965–1968. ... This article is about the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... Combatants Rhodesia ZANLA ZIPRA Government of Botswana Government of Tanzania Government of Zambia Mozambican Liberation Front [1] Commanders Ian Smith P. K. van der Byl Peter Walls ZANU: Robert Mugabe ZAPU: Joshua Nkomo Casualties unknown unknown Civilians killed = Around 30,000 The Rhodesian Bush War —­ as it was known at... The G3 is a 7. ...


Flag of South Africa South Africa

After a competition between the German G3 rifle, the Armalite AR-10, and the FN FAL, the South African Defence Force adopted three variants of the FAL: a rifle under the Commonwealth pattern with the designation R1, a "lightweight" variant of the FN FAL 50.64 fabricated locally under the designation R2, and a model designed for police use not capable of automatic fire under the designation R3.[5] The R2 was built by Lyttleton Engineering Works and Armscor. The R1 rifle in South African service was superseded around the mid 1980s with the locally built 5.56 mm R4 assault rifle, a license-built copy of the Israeli Galil. Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... The G3 is a 7. ... Portuguese paratroopers, armed with AR-10 rifles, jump from a helicopter in Angola War in the 1960s The AR-10 is a lightweight, air-cooled, magazine-fed, gas operated, select-fire rifle that fires 7. ... The South African Defence Force (SADF) were the South African armed forces from 1957 until 1994. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... Lyttleton Engineering Works (LIW from Afrikaans: Lyttleton Ingeneurs Werke) was a South African arms manufacturing company now amalgamated with Vektor Arms as the Systems division of the Land Systems Group of Denel. ... The Armaments Corporation of South Africa (In Afrikaans: Krygstuig Korporasie van Suid-Afrika, or Krygkor), or Armscor, traces its beginnings to 1948 as the South African States defense manufacturing arm, producing everything from heavy ordnance to armoured vehicles and systems. ... The R4 is a South African assault rifle developed in 1980 for the South African Army to replace the R1, which was a variant of the FN FAL. The R4 was first issued during the early 1980s, and is partly based on the Israeli Galil which in turn was based... Estonian soldiers armed with Galil rifles in Baghdad during the Iraq War. ...


Flag of Thailand Thailand

FAL was used by Royal Thai Police Forces since 1960s and designation as "Rifle Type 05" (1962). The FN FAL had been seen with limited use due to the availability of lighter rifles like the M-16 and HK 33. Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... A police officer of the Royal Thai Police The Royal Thai Police (Thai: ) is the federal police force of Thailand. ... M16 Type Assault rifle Nationality United States Era Vietnam, modern History Date of design 1957 Production period 1960 to present Service duration 1960 to present Operators NATO War service Vietnam War, Gulf War, 2003_invasion_of_Iraq Specifications Type Assault Rifle Calibre 5. ... This article is about an automatic rifle. ...


Flag of Turkey Turkey

The Turkish Armed Forces used the FAL as the main rifle the late 1960s where it was replaced by the H&K G3. (Ironically, many of Turkey's FAL were former West German G1, which had been replaced by the G3.) However, the FAL remains in use as a training rifle by the Turkish Army, Turkish Air Forces Infantry Brigade, Turkish Navy Infantry Brigade, and Turkish Police Commanders. Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ...


Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom

US Marine on training exercise with British L1A1 during Operation Desert Shield.
US Marine on training exercise with British L1A1 during Operation Desert Shield.

The United Kingdom developed its own variant of the FAL in 1957 as the L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle (SLR). It was manufactured upon tooling using Imperial measurements and ultimately included many minor changes, considered improvements by the UK. These changes included a folding cocking handle; an enclosed prong-shaped flash suppressor patterned after the US T48 FAL; a folding rear sight; sand-clearing modifications in the body, breech block, breech-block carrier, and gas regulator; an integral "fold-away" trigger guard with modified pistol grip for winter use; a strengthened butt-stock attachment; enlarged fire selector; enlarged and ambidextrous magazine release; a strengthened magazine catch and magazine; modified take-down release lever to prevent unintended activation; and top-cover retainer tabs to prevent forward movement. Late production L1A1 rifles were equipped with synthetic furniture, including handguards, pistol grip, carrying handle and buttstock. This synthetic furniture was produced from "Maranyl" plastic, a Nylon-66 and glass fibre composite. The synthetic L1A1 furniture is noted for its anti-slip texture, termed "Pebblegrain". The synthetic buttstock included the unique feature of a replaceable butt-pad, available in several different sizes to accommodate an individual shooter's "length of pull". The majority of these modifications were also reflected in Canadian (C1 and C2 Rifle), Australian (L1A1, L2A1 AR or Automatic Rifle), and to a lesser extent, Indian (1A-SL) production. The UK L1A1 FAL was produced as a semi-automatic only rifle, in contrast to the original Belgian version which was selective fire. It was known for some individual soldiers to interfere with their rifle's mechanism to enable automatic fire; however, this was contrary to regulations and would be punished if discovered. 30-round magazines from the 7.62 mm L4 light machine gun were used occasionally and unofficially on the UK L1A1; however, being designed for gravity assisted downward feeding, they were not reliable on the SLR. The L1A1 was replaced in the mid 1980s by the 5.56 mm Enfield L85A1. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... The Imperial units are an irregularly standardized system of units that have been used in the United Kingdom and its former colonies, including the Commonwealth countries. ... A selective fire weapon can be fired in either of at least two modes, depending on the position of the selector switch. ... The Bren (from Brno (the Czechoslovakian town of design) and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of squad automatic weapon/light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles into the 1980s. ... The SA80 (Small Arms for the 1980s) is a family of 5. ...


Due to the significant departure of features from the original Belgian FAL rifle, full interchangeability of components between the original Belgian pattern FAL and the L1A1 pattern FAL was not possible, although complete sub-assemblies of the L1A1 pattern rifles are generally interchangeable with assemblies from most other Belgian pattern FAL rifles. Many individual components are also interchangeable, however a significant proportion are not. It should be noted that although the UK L1A1 and its Australian and Canadian counterparts were produced upon machine tools utilizing imperial (English or "inch") measurement systems, they are actually of the same basic dimension as the original Belgian FN FAL rifle. Incompatibility between the original Belgian FAL and the L1A1 are due to feature pattern differences, and not due to different dimensions as [incorrectly] implied by the differing measurement systems. Confusion over this subject has given rise to the common terminology of "metric" or "inch" FAL rifles, presumably originated to reference the machine tools that produced them, when in fact virtually all FAL rifles are of the same basic dimensions - true to the original Belgian FAL design. Popularly, the use of the term "metric" FAL refers to a FAL rifle with original Belgian FN pattern features, and the use of the term "inch" FAL refers to a FAL rifle produced with the modified Australian, Canadian, UK, or "Commonwealth" L1A1 pattern.


The UK L1A1 FAL rifle was manufactured by three makers: The Royal Small Arms Factory Enfield (Enfield); Birmingham Small Arms (BSA); and the Royal Ordnance Factory, Fazakerley (Fazakerley). Replacement components were also made by Parker Hale Ltd. A UK government-owned rifle factory, which was to be later known as the Royal Small Arms Factory (RSAF), Enfield which has produced British military rifles and muskets since 1804. ... The Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) was a British manufacturer of vehicles, firearms, and military equipment, and still exists as an airgun sport manufacturer and distributor. ... Royal Ordnance Factories (ROFs) was the collective name of the UK governments munitions factories in and after World War II. Until privatisation in 1987 they were the responsibility of the Ministry of Supply and later the Ministry of Defence. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


Later production UK L1A1 FAL rifles are noted for the availability of unique optional sights. The first of the optional sights included a folding dual-aperture day/night sight, commonly known as the "Hythe Sight". The Hythe sight was developed for close range, dusk and night use and incorporated two overlapping rear sight aperture leaves, and a permanently glowing (until radioactively decayed) tritium inserts in the front sight post for improved night visibility. Also noteworthy was a unique scope designed specifically for the L1A1 rifle. The scope, identified as the L2A1 "Sight Unit, Infantry, Trilux" (SUIT) is a fixed-focus 4X magnification scope with an unusual prismatic offset, a unique inverted tapered tritium illuminated sight post reticule, and an integral bullet-drop compensation via a two-position mechanical cam. The offset prismatic design reduced overall length for improved clearance around the L1A1 action, reduced parallax errors and significantly reduced the effects of heat mirage from a hot rifle barrel. The inverted sight post allowed a very rapid target re-acquisition due to the fact that recoil typically raises the rifle barrel, leaving a clear sight picture under the inverted pointer, which combined with the pointer's thick taper promoted the quick target re-acquisition. Although relatively heavy, the SUIT scope was also noted for its durability, due to the very robust construction. It is also noteworthy that the during the Cold-War, the UK SUIT scope was copied virtually verbatim by the Soviet Union and designated as the 1P29 telescopic sight. Both the Hythe and SUIT sight options were commonly found on production UK L1A1 FAL rifles.


Since the adoption of the newer SA80 (A1 & A2) rifle, the existing stock of L1A1 rifles has been disposed of. Many former UK rifles were sent to Sierra Leone; however, most were simply destroyed.


Flag of the United States United States

The USA tested the FAL in several forms; initially as manufactured by FN in experimental configurations, and later in the final T48 configuration as an official competitor for the new US Light Self-Loading Rifle intended to replace the M1 Garand. The US Army procured T48 rifles from three firms for testing, including two US based companies in an effort to assess the manufacturability of the FN design in the USA. The T48 was manufactured for testing by Fabrique Nationale (FN), of Herstal, Belgium; Harrington & Richardson (H&R) of Worcester, Massachusetts; and the High Standard Company of Hartford, Connecticut. The United States also received a small number of FAL Heavy Barrel Rifles (HBAR) (either 50.41 or pre-50.41) for testing, under the designation T48E1, though none of these rifles were adopted by US. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... H & R Firearms (Harrington & Richardson) is a Marlin Firearms-owned manufacturer of firearms, especially single-shot shotguns . ... High Standard Manufacturing Company Inc. ...


The T48 competed against the T44 rifle. The T44 was a heavily modified version of the earlier M1 Garand. Testing proved the T48 and the T44 comparable in performance, with no clear winner. However, the supposed ease of production of the T44 upon machinery already in place for the M1 Garand and the similarity in the manual of arms for the T44 and M1 ultimately swayed the decision in the direction of the T44, which was adopted as the M14 rifle. The M1 Garand (more formally the United States Rifle, Caliber . ... For the highway in Michigan, see M-14 (Michigan highway). ...


In the wake of World War II, the NATO "Rifle Steering Committee" was formed to encourage the adoption of a standardized NATO rifle. The Committee and the US interest in the FAL proved to be a turning point in the direction of the FAL's development. The US and NATO interest in small arms standardization was the primary reason why the FAL was redesigned to use the newly developed 7.62x51mm NATO cartridge, instead of the intermediate cartridge designs originally tested by FN. Two political factors are worth noting: the US Government tacitly gave the nod to NATO, and specifically to the United Kingdom, that if the FAL were redesigned for the new US 7.62x51mm cartridge, then the FAL would become acceptable to the US, and the US would presumably adopt the FAL rifle. Secondly, FN had indicated that it would allow former WWII Allied countries to produce the FAL design with no licensing or royalty costs as a gift to the Allies for the liberation of Belgium. Ultimately, the US chose to part with the other NATO members and adopt the M14 rifle, while the majority of NATO countries immediately adopted the FAL.


During the late 1980s and 1990s, many countries decommissioned the FAL from their armouries and sold them en masse to United States importers as surplus. The rifles were imported to the United States as fully-automatic machine guns. Once in the U.S., the FAL's were "de-militarized" (upper receiver destroyed) to eliminate the rifles' character as an automatic rifle. Thousands of the resulting "parts kits" were sold at generally low prices ($90 - $250) to hobbyists. The hobbyists rebuilt the parts kits to legal and functional semi-automatic rifles on new semi-automatic upper receivers. FAL rifles are still commercially available from a few domestic firms in semi-auto configuration: Entreprise Arms, DSA, and Century Arms until recently.


Flag of Venezuela Venezuela

Venezuela was the first country after Belgium to adopt the FN FAL in 1954 and until recently it was the main assault rifle of the Venezuelan army. The President of Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, bought 100,000 AK-103 assault rifles from Russia in order to replace the old FAL, and although the full shipment of AK-103 rifles had arrived in Venezuela by the end of 2006, the FAL will remain in service with the Venezuelan Reserve forces and Territorial Guard. The first batch of rifles to arrive in Venezuela were chambered in 7x49mm (also known as 7 mm Liviano or 7 mm Venezuelan). Essentially a 7x57mm round shortened to intermediate length, this caliber was jointly developed by Venezuelan and Belgian engineers motivated by a global move towards intermediate calibers. The Venezuelans, who had been exclusively using the 7x57mm round in their light and medium weapons since the turn of the century, felt it was a perfect platform on which to base a caliber tailored to the particular rigours of the Venezuelan terrain. Eventually the plan was dropped despite having ordered millions of rounds and thousands of weapons of this caliber. The decision was not based on the attributes of the round, which was actually quite good, but in fact to political motivation. As the Cold War escalated, the military command felt it necessary to align with NATO despite not being a member, resulting in the adoption of the 7.62x51mm cartridge and the rechambering of the 5,000 or so FAL rifles that had already arrived in 7x49mm by 1955-56. Image File history File links Flag_of_Venezuela. ... AK-103 The AK-103 is a modern Russian built version of the famous AK-47 assault rifle, chambered for the 7. ...


Variants

FN Production Variants

FAL 50.41 & 50.42

  • Also known as FALO;
  • Heavy barrel for sustained fire with 30-round magazine as a squad automatic weapon;
  • Known in Canada as the C2A1, it was their primary squad automatic weapon until it was phased out during the 1980s in favour of the C9, which has better accuracy and better ammunition capacity than the C2;
  • Known to the Australian Army as the L2A1, it was replaced by the FN Minimi. The L2A1 or 'heavy barrel' FAL was used by several Commonwealth nations and was found to frequently experience a failure to feed after firing two rounds from a full magazine when in automatic mode.
  • The 50.41 is fitted with a plastic buttstock, while the 50.42's buttstock is made from wood.

A squad automatic weapon (SAW) is a light or general-purpose machine gun, usually equipped with a bipod and firing a 7. ... The FN Minimi is a squad automatic weapon — the name coming from Mini-mitrailleuse (French: mini-machine gun. It is a 5. ...

FAL 50.61

  • Folding-stock, standard barrel length

FAL 50.63

  • Folding-stock, shorter-barrel paratrooper version;
  • Two variants with differing barrel lengths: 458 mm versus 436 mm. The shorter version was requested by Belgian paratroopers. This allowed the folded-stock rifle to fit through the doorway of their C-119 Flying Boxcar when worn horizontally across the chest.

For the game, see Paratrooper (video game). ... The Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar was a U.S. military transport aircraft developed from the World War II Fairchild C-82 Packet, designed to carry cargo, personnel, litter patients, and mechanized equipment, and to drop cargo and troops by parachute. ...

FAL 50.64

  • Folding-stock, standard barrel length, 'Hiduminium' aluminum alloy lower receiver

References

  1. ^ Popeneker, Maxim & Williams, Anthony. Assault Rifle The Crowood Press Ltd. (2005) ISBN 1-86126-700-2.
  2. ^ Service Rifles. Retrieved on May 13, 2008.
  3. ^ Ezell, 1988, p. 83
  4. ^ Ezell, 1988, p. 276
  5. ^ Ezell, 1988, p. 328
  • Afonso, Aniceto and Gomes, Carlos de Matos, Guerra Colonial, 2000
  • Ezell, Clinton, Small Arms of the World, Stackpole Books (1983)
  • Pikula, Maj. Sam, The Armalite AR-10, 1998
  • Stevens, R. Blake, The FAL Rifle, Collector Grade Publications (1993)
  • Gerard, Henrotin, The FN FAL Explained, H&L Publishing - HLebooks.com (2004)

is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The SIG 510/Sturmgewehr 57 is a battle rifle manufactured by SIGARMS (now SAN Swiss Arms) of Switzerland. ... The G3 is a 7. ... The Kel-Tec RFB Carbine is based on the FN FAL series of Battle rifles. ... The GRAM 63 is a battle rifle intended to replace the Ljungman rifles in the Swedish army and was manufactured by the Carl Gustav corporation. ... The FM1957 is a Swedish Battle rifle based on the Ljungman rifles. ... For the highway in Michigan, see M-14 (Michigan highway). ... Portuguese paratroopers, armed with AR-10 rifles, jump from a helicopter in Angola War in the 1960s The AR-10 is a lightweight, air-cooled, magazine-fed, gas operated, select-fire rifle that fires 7. ... The AR-18 is an assault rifle chambered for 5. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Howa Type 64 Rifle, referred to as the 64式 (ロクヨンしき or rokuyonshiki), is a Japanese-exclusive battle rifle used by the Japanese Self-Defense Forces and the Japanese Coast Guard. ... The Samozaryadnaya Vintovka Tokareva 40 is a Soviet semi-automatic rifle, which saw widespread service in World War II. It was the first self-loading battle rifle which was issued to service in large numbers. ...

External links

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Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... The Browning Hi-Power is a single-action, 9 mm semi-automatic pistol. ... The Walther PP ( Polizei Pistole ) was introduced in 1929. ... The SIG Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service type pistol chambered for the 9x19mm Parabellum, .40 S&W and . ... The SIG Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service type pistol chambered for the 9x19mm Parabellum, .40 S&W and . ... Caliber: 9 x 19 mm Parabellum / 7. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... A squad automatic weapon, (abbrev. ... The SA80 (Small Arms for the 1980s) is a family of 5. ... The FN Minimi is a squad automatic weapon — the name coming from Mini-mitrailleuse (French: mini-machine gun. It is a 5. ... The HK 53 is an assault carbine variant of the HK33 rifle, based on the proven delayed roller lock bolt system introduced with the MG30 machine gun scaled down to 5. ... M16 (more formally Rifle, Caliber 5. ... The C7 is a service rifle variation of the M16 rifle that is manufactured by Diemaco/Colt Canada, a subsidiary of Colt Firearms after 2005, and used by the Canadian Forces, Hærens Jegerkommando (Norway), Military of Denmark (all branches), the Royal Netherlands Army and Netherlands Marine Corps as its... The G3 is a 7. ... The M40, United States Marine Corps standard-issue sniper rifle. ... Lee-Enfield No4 Mk1 with bayonet, scabbard attached The Lee-Enfield was the British armys standard bolt action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle from 1895 until 1956. ... The Accuracy International Arctic Warfare rifle is a family of bolt-action sniper rifles designed and manufactured by the British company Accuracy International. ... The Super Magnum(L115A1) is a precision rifle or sniper rifle produced by the British firm Accuracy International. ... For the assault rifle, see Valmet M82. ... The AW50F is a . ... The MP5 is a third-generation submachine gun that is widely used by law enforcement tactical teams and military forces. ... The Sterling submachine gun is a British submachine gun which was in service with the British Army from 1953 until 1988 when it was phased out with the introduction of the L85A1 IW (Individual Weapon). ... The MP5 is a 9 mm submachine gun of German design, developed in the 1960s by a group of engineers from the West German arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (HK). ... The MP5 is a 9 mm submachine gun of German design, developed in the 1960s by a group of engineers from the West German arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (HK). ... For other uses, see Shotgun (disambiguation). ... The Browning Auto-5 was a recoil-operated autoloading shotgun designed by John Browning. ... The Remington Model 870 is a U.S.-made pump-action shotgun. ... A . ... The Browning M1919 was a . ... The Bren (from Brno, the Czechoslovak city of design, and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles until 1991. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the . ... Under-Slung Grenade Launcher (UGL) is the under-barrel 40 mm grenade launcher used by the British Army in conjunction with the SA80 A2 Rifle, and in small numbers with the Diemaco C7 Rifle used by the SAS. It is designed and built by Heckler and Koch (HK) and is... The ARWEN 37 is a less-lethal launcher designed during the 1960s by the British company Royal Ordnance. ... The M72 LAW (Light Anti-Tank Weapon, also referred to as the Light Anti-Armor Weapon or LAW) is a portable one-shot 66 mm anti-tank weapon, designed in the United States by Talley Defense Systems, produced by Nammo Raufoss AS in Norway. ... The M72 LAW (Light Anti-Tank Weapon, also referred to as the Light Anti-Armor Weapon or LAW) is a portable one-shot 66 mm anti-tank weapon, designed in the United States by Talley Defense Systems, produced by Nammo Raufoss AS in Norway. ... The LAW 80 is an anti-tank weapon in service with the British Army. ... Carl Gustav anti-tank weapon in action With the Irish Army. ... This article is about the unguided anti-tank weapon. ... This article is about the unguided anti-tank weapon. ... The L9A1 51 mm Light Mortar is a man-portable mortar system used by the British Army. ... The United Kingdoms L16 81 mm mortar is the standard mortar used by the British army. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... For the British Javelin missile, see Javelin surface-to-air missile. ... U.S. Military 5. ... NATO 7. ... .50 BMG rounds and 20MM Vulcan round, with a golf ball and a stick of RAM posed to provide scale. ... The . ... The 9x19mm Parabellum is a pistol cartridge introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for their Luger pistol. ... 12 gauge is the most common size of shotgun shell. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... For other uses, see Commonwealth (disambiguation). ... A handgun is a firearm small enough to be carried and used in one hand. ... The Beaumont-Adams Revolver was a . ... The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth from 1887 until 1963. ... Enfield No. ... The Browning Hi-Power is a single-action, 9 mm semi-automatic pistol. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... Short Land Service musket Brown Bess is a nickname of unknown origin for the British Armys Land Pattern Musket and its derivatives. ... British Ferguson Rifle The Ferguson rifle was most likely the first breech loading rifle to be adopted by any organized military force. ... 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The Lee-Metford rifle was a breech-loading British army service rifle, combining James Paris Lees rear-locking bolt system and ten-round magazine with a seven groove rifled barrel designed by William Ellis Metford. ... Lee-Enfield No4 Mk1 with bayonet, scabbard attached The Lee-Enfield was the British armys standard bolt action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle from 1895 until 1956. ... The Fusil Automatique Leger, or Light Automatic Rifle (LAR). ... Jungle Carbine was an informal term used for the Rifle No. ... Line drawing of Guppy 13 pocket cruiser The De Lisle carbine was a British rifle used during World War II. It was based on a Lee_Enfield rifle converted to . ... The MP5 is a third-generation submachine gun that is widely used by law enforcement tactical teams and military forces. ... The Lanchester was a submachine gun used by the British during World War II. History In 1940, with the Dunkirk evacuation completed, the Royal Air Force decided to adopt some form of submachine gun for airfield defense. ... This article is about the submachine gun. ... The Owen Gun, which was known officially as the Owen Machine Carbine, was an Australian submachine gun designed by Evelyn (Evo) Owen in 1939. ... The Sterling submachine gun is a British submachine gun which was in service with the British Army from 1953 until 1988 when it was phased out with the introduction of the L85A1 IW (Individual Weapon). ... Australian submachine gun of 9mm calibre, Used in Vietnam war The 9 millimeter F1 was a standard Australian submachine gun. ... A . ... [[Image:]] The Nordenfelt Gun was an early multiple barrel machine gun that had a row from one to twelve barrels. ... An 1865 Gatling gun. ... An early Maxim gun in operation with the Royal Navy 1895 . ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled . ... The Lewis Gun is a pre-World War I era squad automatic weapon/machine gun of American design that was most widely used by the forces of the British Empire. ... The Charlton Automatic Rifle was a fully automatic conversion of the Lee-Enfield rifle, designed by New Zealander Philip Charlton in 1941 to act as a substitute for the Bren and Lewis gun Light Machine Guns which were in chronically short supply at the time. ... The Bren (from Brno, the Czechoslovak city of design, and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles until 1991. ... Anti-tank, or simply AT, refers to any method of combating military armored fighting vehicles, notably tanks. ... Ordnance QF 2 pounder Type Anti-tank gun Nationality UK Era WW2 Target armoured vehicles History Date of design 1936 Production period 1936 - Number built Service duration 1936-1945 Operators War service WW2 Specifications Carriage Calibre 40 mm Barrel length 50 calibres Weight 130 kg Ammunition AP Shell weight 2... QF 6 pounder anti-tank gun in Batey ha-Osef museum, Israel. ... The Projector, Infantry, Anti Tank, was one of the earlier anti-tank weapons using a high explosive anti-tank projectile. ... The Rifle, Anti-Tank, .55in, Boys commonly known as the Boys or often and incorrectly Boyes Anti-tank Rifle was a British anti-tank rifle. ... The L6 Wombat, (Weapon Of Magnesium, Batallion, Anti-Tank) was a 120 mm calibre recoilless anti-tank rifle used by the British armed forces. ... A field gun is an artillery piece. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
The FN FAL Automatic Rifle (486 words)
The FN FAL Automatic Rifle developed by the Belgium company "Fabrique Nationale" was intended as a main infantry rifle.
The FN FAL became one of the most widespread and popular rifles of the world with the M16 and the AK rifle families.
FN FAL is fitted with a raised buttstock which decreases recoil power and weapon's tossing in vertical plane.
FN FAL: Information from Answers.com (4088 words)
In the West, FAL's primary competitor was the German Heckler and Koch G3 and to a lesser extent, the Armalite AR-10.
The FAL was made by Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN) in Liège and under license in a number of countries, including the United Kingdom, South Africa (where it was known as the R1), Brazil, Australia, Canada, Israel, Austria and Argentina.
The Israeli FAL first saw action in relatively small quantities during the Suez Crisis of 1956, and by the Six-Day War in June 1967, it was the standard Israeli rifle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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