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Encyclopedia > FAO soil classification

The FAO developed a supra-national classification, also called World Soil Classification, which offers useful generalizations about soils pedogenesis in relation to the interactions with the main soil-forming factors. It was first published in form of the Unesco Soil Map of the World (1974) (scale 1 : 5 M.). Many of the names offered in that classification are known in many countries and do have similar meanings.


Originally developed as a legend to the Soil Map of the World, the classification has been applied by United Nations sponsored projects. Many countries have modified this system to fit their particular needs.


The Soil Units (106) are mapped as Soil Associations, designated by the dominant soil unit,

  • with soil phases (soil properties, such as saline, lithic, stony),
  • with three textural classes (coarse, medium, and fine)
  • three slopes classes superimposed (level to gently undulating, rolling to hilly, and steeply dissected to mountainous)

Soil Units form 26 World Classes. The FAO soil map is a very simple classification system with units very broad, but it is the only truly international system, and most soils can be accommodated on the basis of their field descriptions. The FAO soil map is intended for mapping soils at a continental scale but not at local scale.


FAO Soil Units

  • Acrisols
  • Andosols
  • Arenosols
  • Cambisols
  • Chernozems
  • Ferralsols
  • Fluvisols
  • Gleysols
  • Greyzems
  • Histosols
  • Kastanozems
  • Lithosols
  • Luvisols
  • Nitosols
  • Phaeozems
  • Planosols
  • Podzols
  • Podzoluvisols
  • Rankers
  • Regosols
  • Rendzinas
  • Solonchaks
  • Solonetz
  • Vertisols
  • Yermosols

Related articles

External link

world map (http://www.fao.org/sd/frdirect/gis/chap7.htm)


  Results from FactBites:
 
FAO soil classification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (268 words)
The FAO developed a supra-national classification, also called World Soil Classification, which offers useful generalizations about soils pedogenesis in relation to the interactions with the main soil-forming factors.
The FAO soil map is a very simple classification system with units very broad, but it is the only truly international system, and most soils can be accommodated on the basis of their field descriptions.
The FAO soil map is intended for mapping soils at a continental scale but not at local scale.
Soil classification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1007 words)
Soil classification is a contentious subject, from the structure of the system itself, to the definitions of classes, and finally in the application in the field.
In soil survey, as practiced in the United States, soil classification usually means criteria based on soil morphology in addition to characteristics developed during soil formation.
Fine-grained soils are then subdivided according to their plasticity (for fine soils and coarse soils with some fines), while coarse-grained soils are subdivided by the properies of the fines or their grain-size homogeneity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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