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Encyclopedia > F. Scott Fitzgerald
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald, photographed by Carl van Vechten in 1937
Born: September 24, 1896(1896-09-24)
Flag of United States St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Died: December 21, 1940 (aged 44)
Flag of United States Hollywood, California, USA
Occupation: Novelist, screenwriter
Nationality: American
Writing period: 1920-1940
Genres: Literary fiction
Literary movement: Modernism
Debut works: This Side of Paradise

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. He is regarded as one of the greatest twentieth century writers. Fitzgerald was of the self-styled "Lost Generation," Americans born in the 1890s who came of age during World War I. He finished four novels, left a fifth unfinished, and wrote dozens of short stories that treat themes of youth, despair, and age. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1125x1536, 263 KB) Alternative version: Image:F Scott Fitzgerald. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nickname: Location in Ramsey County and the state of Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... ... Modernist literature is the literary form of Modernism and especially High modernism; it should not be confused with modern literature, which is the history of the modern novel and modern poetry as one. ... This Side of Paradise is the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Jazz Age, describes the period from 1918-1929, the years between the end of World War I and the start of the Great Depression, particularly in North America and (in the eras literature) specifically in Miami, largely coinciding with the Roaring Twenties; ending with the rise of the... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Lost Generation is traditionally attributed to John Wilks Booth[1] and was then popularized by Ernest Hemingway in the epigraph to his novel The Sun Also Rises and his memoir A Moveable Feast. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

Contents

Early Years

Born on Cathedral Hill in St. Paul, Minnesota, to an upper-middle class Irish Catholic family, Fitzgerald was named for his famous relative Francis Scott Key, but was commonly known as 'Scott'. He spent 1898–1901 and 1903–1908 in Buffalo, New York, where his father worked for Procter & Gamble. When Fitzgerald, Sr. was fired, the family moved back to Minnesota, where Fitzgerald attended St. Paul Academy in St. Paul from 1908–1911. His first piece of literature was published in his school newspaper when he was 13. He attended Newman School, a prep school in Hackensack, New Jersey, in 1911–1912. He entered Princeton University in 1913 as a member of the Class of 1917 and became friends with the future critics and writers Edmund Wilson (Class of 1916) and John Peale Bishop (Class of 1917), and while there wrote for the Princeton Triangle Club. A mediocre student throughout his three-year career at the university, Fitzgerald dropped out in 1917 to enlist in the United States Army when the US entered World War I. Fitzgerald wrote a novel titled The Romantic Egotist, portions of which later largely were reincarnated as the first half of This Side of Paradise, while at Princeton and edited, to some extent, at Camp Zachary Taylor and Camp Sheridan. When Fitzgerald submitted the novel to Charles Scribner's Sons, the editor praised the writing but ultimately rejected the book. The war ended shortly after Fitzgerald's enlistment. State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ... Francis Scott Key Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left) Francis Scott Key (August 2, 1779 – January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, an author, and an amateur poet who wrote the words to... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Erie County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown Area  - City 52. ... NY redirects here. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... Saint Paul Academy and Summit School (commonly known as SPA) is a private school in Saint Paul, Minnesota consisting of grades K-12. ... Hackensack is a city in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States and the county seat of Bergen CountyGR6. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... John Peale Bishop (May 21, 1892 - April 4, 1944) was an American poet and man of letters. ... The Princeton Triangle Club is a drama society at Princeton University, more than a century old. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Camp Zachary Taylor was a military training camp in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Charles Scribners Sons is a publisher that was founded in 1846 at the Brick Church Chapel on New Yorks Park Row. ...


Marriage to Zelda Sayre

While at Camp Sheridan, Fitzgerald met Zelda Sayre (1900–1948), the "top girl," in Fitzgerald's words, of Montgomery, Alabama youth society. She was the daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court Judge. The two were engaged in 1919, and Fitzgerald moved into an apartment at 1395 Lexington Avenue in New York City to try to lay a foundation for his life with Zelda. Working at an advertising firm and writing short stories, he was unable to convince Zelda that he would be able to support her, leading her to break off the engagement. Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 - March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama, was the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, whom she married in 1920. ... Coordinates: Country United States State Alabama County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Mayor Bobby Bright Area    - City 404. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... The Supreme Court of Alabama is the highest court in the state of Alabama. ... “New York, NY” redirects here. ...


Fitzgerald returned to his parents' house on Cathedral Hill in St. Paul to revise The Romantic Egotist. Recast as This Side of Paradise, about the flapper generation of the Roaring 20s, it was accepted by Scribner's in the fall of 1919, and Zelda and Scott resumed their engagement. The novel was published on March 26, 1920, and became one of the most popular books of the year. Scott and Zelda were married in New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral. Their daughter and only child, Frances Scott "Scottie" Fitzgerald, was born on October 26, 1921. This Side of Paradise was F. Scott Fitzgeralds first novel, published in 1920. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Referred to as the Roaring 20s. ... Charles Scribners Sons is a publisher that was founded in 1846 at the Brick Church Chapel on New Yorks Park Row. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... St. ... Frances Scott Scottie Fitzgerald (October 26, 1921 – June 18, 1986) was the only child of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald and novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


"The Jazz Age"

The 1920s proved the most influential decade of Fitzgerald's development. His second novel, The Beautiful and Damned, published in 1922, demonstrates an evolution beyond the comparatively immature This Side of Paradise. The Great Gatsby, Scott's masterpiece, was published in 1925. Fitzgerald made several excursions to Europe, notably Paris and the French Riviera, and became friends with many members of the American expatriate community in Paris, notably Ernest Hemingway. The Beautiful and Damned , F. Scott Fitzgeralds second novel, tells the story of Anthony Patch (a 1920s socialite and presumptive heir to a tycoons fortune), and the relationship with his wife Gloria, his service in the army, and alcoholism. ... This Side of Paradise is the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... The Great Gatsby is a novel by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ...


Hemingway looked up to Fitzgerald as an experienced professional writer. Hemingway greatly admired The Great Gatsby and wrote in his A Moveable Feast "If he could write a book as fine as The Great Gatsby I was sure that he could write an even better one" (153). Hemingway expressed his deep admiration for Fitzgerald, and Fitzgerald's flawed, doomed character, when he prefaced his chapters concerning Fitzgerald in A Moveable Feast with: The Great Gatsby is a novel by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... A Moveable Feast is also the title of a live album by Fairport Convention A Moveable Feast is a set of memoirs by American author Ernest Hemingway. ... The Great Gatsby is a novel by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... A Moveable Feast is also the title of a live album by Fairport Convention A Moveable Feast is a set of memoirs by American author Ernest Hemingway. ...

His talent was as natural as the pattern that was made by the dust on a butterfly's wings. At one time he understood it no more than the butterfly did and he did not know when it was brushed or marred. Later he became conscious of his damaged wings and their construction and he learned to think and could not fly any more because the love of flight was gone and he could only remember when it had been effortless. (129)

Fitzgerald drew largely upon his wife's intense, mentally disturbed personality in his writings, at times quoting direct segments of her personal diaries in his work. Zelda made mention of this in a 1922 mock review in the New York Tribune, saying that "[i]t seems to me that on one page I recognized a portion of an old diary of mine which mysteriously disappeared shortly after my marriage, and also scraps of letters which, though considerably edited, sound to me vaguely familiar. In fact, Mr. Fitzgerald—I believe that is how he spells his name—seems to believe that plagiarism begins at home" (Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings, 388). The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ...


Although Fitzgerald's passion lay in writing novels, they never sold well enough to support the opulent lifestyle that he and Zelda adopted as New York celebrities. To supplement his income, he turned to writing short stories for such magazines as The Saturday Evening Post, Collier's Weekly, and Esquire magazine, and sold movie rights of his stories and novels to Hollywood studios. He was constantly in financial trouble and often required loans from his literary agent, Harold Ober, and his editor at Scribner's, Maxwell Perkins. A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903 The Saturday Evening Post was a weekly magazine published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. ... November 24, 1917 cover Colliers Weekly was an American magazine that was published between 1888 and 1957. ... Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... Harold Ober (1881-1959) was the literary agent of F. Scott Fitzgerald and others. ... Charles Scribners Sons is a publisher that was founded in 1846 at the Brick Church Chapel on New Yorks Park Row. ... Maxwell Perkins (1884-1947) was the famous editor of novelists F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, and others, at the publisher Charles Scribners Sons during the first half of the 20th Century. ...


Fitzgerald began working on his fourth novel during the late 1920s but was sidetracked by financial difficulties that necessitated his writing commercial short stories, and by the schizophrenia that struck Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald in 1930. Her emotional health remained fragile for the rest of her life. In 1932, she was hospitalized in Baltimore, Maryland. Scott rented the "La Paix" estate in the suburb of Towson, Maryland to work on his latest book, the story of the rise and fall of Dick Diver, a promising young psychiatrist who falls in love with and marries Nicole Warren, one of his patients. The book is clearly a thinly-veiled autobiographical novel recounting Fitzgerald's problems with his wife, the corrosive effects of wealth and a decadent lifestyle, his own egoism and self-confidence, and his continuing alcoholism. It was published in 1934 as Tender Is the Night. While it was not received well upon publication, and Scott continued to revise it throughout the 1930s, the book's reputation has since risen significantly. Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 - March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama, was the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, whom she married in 1920. ... Towson is an unincorporated community and a census-designated place in Baltimore County, Maryland, United States. ... Tender Is the Night, first published by Charles Scribners Sons in 1934, is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. ...


Hollywood years

Although he reportedly found movie work degrading, Fitzgerald was once again in dire financial straits, and spent the second half of the 1930s in Hollywood, working on commercial short stories, scripts for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (including some unfilmed work on Gone with the Wind), and his fifth and final novel, The Love of the Last Tycoon. Published posthumously as The Last Tycoon, it was based on the life of film executive Irving Thalberg. Scott and Zelda became estranged; she continued living in mental institutions on the east coast, while he lived with his lover Sheilah Graham, a movie columnist, in Hollywood. From 1939 until his death, Fitzgerald mocked himself as a Hollywood hack through the character of Pat Hobby in a sequence of 17 short stories, later collected as "The Pat Hobby Stories" ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... The Love of The Last Tycoon: A Western is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published posthumously. ... Categories: Literature stubs | 1941 books | 1994 books | Novels ... Irving Grant Thalberg (May 30, 1899 - September 14, 1936) was an American film producer during the early years of motion pictures. ... Sheilah Graham Westbrook (September 15, 1904-November 17, 1988) is best known as a nationally syndicated gossip columnist during Hollywoods Golden Age, who with Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper wielded power to make or break careers prompting her to describe herself as the Last of the unholy trio. ... ... Hack writer is a colloquial, usually pejorative, term used to refer to a writer who is paid to write low-quality, quickly put-together articles or books to order, often with a short deadline. ... The Pat Hobby Stories are a collection of 17 short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald between 1939 and 1940, the year of his death. ...


Illness and death

Fitzgerald had clearly been an alcoholic since his college days, and he became notorious during the 1920s for his extraordinarily heavy drinking. This left him in poor health by the late 1930s. According to Zelda's biographer, Nancy Milford, Scott claimed that he had contracted tuberculosis, but she states that this was usually a pretext to cover his drinking problems. However, Fitzgerald scholar Matthew J. Bruccoli contends that Fitzgerald did in fact have recurring tuberculosis, and Nancy Milford reports that Fitzgerald biographer Arthur Mizener said that Scott suffered a mild attack of tuberculosis in 1919, and in 1929 he had "what proved to be a tubercular hemorrhage". It may be pure coincidence but two of Fitzgerald's least likeable characters have the initials "TB" (an achronym for tuberculosis) - Tom Buchanan in The Great Gatsby and Tommy Barban in Tender is The Night. Given the extent of Scott's alcoholism, however, it is possible that the hemorrhage was caused by bleeding from esophageal varices—enlarged veins in the esophagus that result from advanced liver disease. In spite of these serious problems, it was most likely Fitzgerald's lifelong smoking habit that most damaged his health and brought on the heart problems that eventually killed him. King Alcohol and his Prime Minister circa 1820 Alcoholism is the consumption of or preoccupation with alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the alcoholics normal personal, family, social, or work life. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease that is caused by mycobacteria, primarily Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Matthew Joseph Bruccoli (born 1931) is Professor of English at the University of South Carolina, USA. He is a noted excerpt on writers F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. ... In medicine (gastroenterology), esophageal varices are extreme dilations of sub mucosal veins in the mucosa of the esophagus in diseases featuring portal hypertension, secondary to cirrhosis primarily. ...


Fitzgerald suffered two heart attacks in late 1940. After the first, in Schwab's Drug Store, he was ordered by his doctor to avoid strenuous exertion and to obtain a first floor apartment, which he did by moving in with Sheilah Graham. On the night of December 20, 1940, he had his second heart attack, and the next day, December 21, while awaiting a visit from his doctor, Fitzgerald collapsed in Graham's apartment and died. He was 44. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Schwabs drug store, at 8000 Sunset Blvd in Hollywood, was the meeting place of movie actors and dealmakers from the 30s through the 50s. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Among the attendants at a visitation held at a funeral home in Hollywood was Dorothy Parker, who reportedly cried and murmured "the poor son of a bitch," a line from Jay Gatsby's funeral in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. In another strange coincidence, the author Nathanael West, who was a friend and admirer of Fitzgerald, was killed along with his wife on the way to Fitzgerald's services. Fitzgerald's remains were then shipped to Maryland, where his funeral was attended by very few people. Zelda died tragically in a fire at the Highland Mental Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1948. The two were originally buried in Rockville Union Cemetery, but with the permission and assistance of their only child, Frances "Scottie" Fitzgerald Lanahan Smith, the Women's Club of Rockville had their bodies moved to the family plot in Saint Mary's Cemetery, in Rockville, Maryland. Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. ... The cover of the Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition, 1995. ... Nathanael West (October 17, 1903 – December 22, 1940) was the pen name of US author, screenwriter and satirist Nathan Wallenstein Weinstein. ... Highland Mental Hospital was a sanitorium located in Asheville, North Carolina. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Rockville Union Cemetery was established in 1738 by the Anglican Prince Georges Parish. ... Saint Marys Cemetery is located in the center of Rockville, Maryland. ... Location in the State of Maryland Coordinates: Country United States State Maryland County Montgomery County Founded 1717 Incorporated 1860  - Mayor Larry Giammo Area    - City  13. ...


Fitzgerald never completed The Love of the Last Tycoon. His notes for the novel were edited by his friend Edmund Wilson and published in 1941 as The Last Tycoon. However, there is now critical agreement that Fitzgerald intended the title of the book to be The Love of the Last Tycoon, as is reflected in a new 1994 edition of the book, edited by Fitzgerald scholar Matthew Bruccoli of the University of South Carolina. The Love of The Last Tycoon: A Western is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published posthumously. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... The University of South Carolina (also known as USC, South Carolina, or simply Carolina) is a public, coeducational, research university. ...


Works

Novels

This Side of Paradise is the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... The Beautiful and Damned , F. Scott Fitzgeralds second novel, tells the story of Anthony Patch (a 1920s socialite and presumptive heir to a tycoons fortune), and the relationship with his wife Gloria, his service in the army, and alcoholism. ... The Great Gatsby is a novel by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Tender Is the Night, first published by Charles Scribners Sons in 1934, is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... The Love of The Last Tycoon: A Western is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published posthumously. ...

Other works

The Crack-Up (1945) is a book by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Winter Dreams is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald that first appeared in the Metropolitan Magazine in December 1922, and was collected in All The Sad Young Men in 1926. ... Babylon Revisited is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, written in 1930 and first published in the The Saturday Evening Post on February 21, 1931, and had many parallels to Fitzgeralds own life, both personal and historical. ... Tales of the Jazz Age (1922) is a collection of short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... The Diamond as Big as the Ritz is a short story by novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Bernice Bobs Her Hair is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, written in 1920 and first published in the Saturday Evening Post in May of that year. ... The Ice Palace is a modernist short story written and published by F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1920. ... Head and Shoulders is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald written and published in 1920. ... Flappers and Philosophers was the first collection of short stories written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published in 1920. ...

Published as

  • Novels & Stories 1920-1922: This Side of Paradise, Flappers and Philosophers, The Beautiful and Damned, Tales of the Jazz Age (Jackson R. Bryer, ed.) (Library of America, 2000) ISBN 978-1-88301184-0.

The Rich Boy (short story) Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...


Biography and criticism

  • The standard biographies of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald are Arthur Mizener's The Far Side of Paradise (1951, 1965), and Matthew Bruccoli's Some Sort of Epic Grandeur (1981). Fitzgerald's letters have also been published in various editions such as Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, ed. Jackson R. Bryer and Cathy W. Banks (2002); Correspondence of F. Scott Fitzgerald, ed. Matthew Bruccoli and Margaret Duggan (1980), and F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Life in Letters, ed. Matthew Bruccoli (1994).
  • Zelda Fitzgerald published an autobiographically-charged novel, Save Me the Waltz, in 1934.
  • The film Beloved Infidel (1959) depicts Fitzgerald (played by Gregory Peck) during his final years as a Hollywood scenarist. Another film, Last Call (2002) (Jeremy Irons plays Fitzgerald) describes the relationship with Frances Kroll during his last two years of life. The film was based on the memoir of Frances Kroll Ring, entitled Against the Current: As I Remember F. Scott Fitzgerald (1985), that records her experience as secretary to Fitzgerald for the last 20 months of his life.

Matthew Joseph Bruccoli (born 1931) is Professor of English at the University of South Carolina, USA. He is a noted excerpt on writers F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. ... Save Me the Waltz is an autobiographical novel by Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald that was published in 1932. ... Frasier, see Beloved Infidel. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Oscar-winning American film actor. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies are made. ... Last Call is a 2002 film written and directed by Henry Bromell about F. Scott Fitzgerald, based on the novel by Frances Kroll Ring. ... Jeremy John Irons (born September 19, 1948) is an Academy Award, Tony Award, Screen Actors Guild, two-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning English film, television and stage actor. ...

Sources

Hemingway, Ernest. A Moveable Feast. London: Arrow Books, 1996.


External links

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

Persondata
NAME Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Fitzgerald, F. Scott
SHORT DESCRIPTION American novelist and screenwriter
DATE OF BIRTH September 24, 1896
PLACE OF BIRTH St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
DATE OF DEATH December 21, 1940
PLACE OF DEATH Hollywood, California, USA

 
 

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