FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fürst

For Fürst, the German title of nobility that is best translated as "Prince", see below. The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... For other meanings, see Prince (disambiguation). ...


In the general sense, the German word "Fürst" refers to a ruler, as in Machiavelli's The Prince. Thus a king, a duke, and a Fürst in the narrow sense are all covered by the term. Before the 12th century also counts were included, according to how the word was used in Germany. German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... A ruler is a person in charge of a country. ... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ... This article is about the book. ... This article treats the generic title monarch. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess. Originally the title comes denoted the rank of a high official in the late Roman Empire: before Anthemius was made emperor in the West in 467, he was... The Holy Roman Empire ( German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) ( Italian: Sacro Romano Impero) ( Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium) ( Czech: Svatá říše římská) ( French: Saint Empire Romain Germanique) ( Polish: Święte Cesarstwo Rzymskie Narodu Niemieckiego) ( Dutch: Heilige Roomse Rijk) was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the...


The word Fürst designates the head (the "first") of a ruling house, or the head of a branch of such a house. The "first" originates from ancient Germanic times, when the "first" was the leader in battle.


The child of a Fürst (in this general sense) is as a rule called Prinz (male) or Prinzessin (female), although exceptionally there exist families where all or some members are Fürst/Fürstin (Wrede) or Herzog/Herzogin (Anhalt, Bavaria, Mecklenburg, Oldenburg, Saxony and Württemberg)[1]  (http://pages.prodigy.net/ptheroff/gotha/gotha.htm).


Cognates of the word Fürst exist in the Slavonic. The German title is also used in Scandinavian (North Germanic) languages, it is spelled furste in Swedish, and fyrste in Danish and Norwegian. The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) comprise the languages of the Slavic peoples. ... A North Germanic language is any of several Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia, parts of Finland and on the islands west of Scandinavia. ... Swedish (svenska) is a language spoken principally in Sweden, Finland (Finland-Swedish, Swedish: finlandssvenska), Åland and in the coastland of Estonia Swedish is classified as a member of the East section of the Scandinavian languages, a sub-group of the Germanic group of the Indo-European language family. ...


The title Fürst is used for the head of a princely house of German origin. Unless he also holds a higher title, as duke or king, he will be known as Fürst von plus the geographic origin of the dynasty, alternatively Fürst zu plus the domain ruled. (Exceptions exist.)


The actual rank of the holder of a title is, however, dependent on not only the title as such, but on for instance the degree of sovereignty and on the rank of the lord of the title-holder. But also such matters as the age of the princely dynasty play a role (note the terms Uradel, Briefadel, altfürstliche, neufürstliche; and see German nobility). Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme authority over a geographic region or group of people, such as a nation or a tribe. ... A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change. ...


A Kurfürst was an Elector of the Holy Roman Empire. Kur (earlier spelling Chur) is derived from kur/küren, to choose. The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The Holy Roman Empire ( German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) ( Italian: Sacro Romano Impero) ( Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium) ( Czech: Svatá říše římská) ( French: Saint Empire Romain Germanique) ( Polish: Święte Cesarstwo Rzymskie Narodu Niemieckiego) ( Dutch: Heilige Roomse Rijk) was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the...


Großfürst is German for the Latin Magnus Princeps, which in English is translated as Grand duke, used for instance for the sons of a Tsar. Grand duke is otherwise translated as Großherzog in German, and as Magnus Dux in Latin. Latin - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... Tsar ( Bulgarian цар, Russian царь,  listen?; often spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to...


Example of bearers of the Fürst-title are the present-day rulers of the principalities Liechtenstein and of Monaco. Also the hereditary rulers of the former principalities of Bulgaria, Serbia, Montenegro and Albania bore the title "Fürst" until they gradually acquired the title of "King". Prince Albert of Monaco on the left represents a principality where he wields adminisitrative authority. ... The Principality of Liechtenstein (German: Fürstentum Liechtenstein) is a tiny, doubly landlocked country (one of two such countries, the other being Uzbekistan) in Central Europe, bordered by Switzerland to its west and by Austria to its east. ... The Principality of Monaco or Monaco ( French: Principauté de Monaco or Monaco; Monegasque: Munegu or Principatu de Munegu) is a city state and the second-smallest country in the world, wedged in between the Mediterranean Sea and France along the French Riviera or Côte dAzur (The Blue Coast). ... The Republic of Bulgaria is a republic in the southeast of Europe. ... This article is about the republic in Serbia-Montenegro, Europe. ... Albania is a Mediterranean country in southeastern Europe. ...


See also: Grand duchy, Grand duke, Grand duchess and Titles of nobility A grand duchy is a form of principality which has a Grand Duke or a Grand Duchess as head of state. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... A Grand Duchess is the wife of a Grand Duke or a woman who rules a Grand Duchy in her own right. ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m