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Encyclopedia > Ezola B. Foster

Ezola Broussard Foster (born August 9, 1938) is an African American conservative political activist. Foster is president of "Americans for Family Values", authored the book What's Right for All Americans, and was the Reform Party candidate for Vice President in the U.S. presidential election of 2000. In April 2002, Foster left the Reform Party to join the Constitution Party. August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as involvement in action to bring about change, be it social, political, environmental, or other change. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues--and... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative third party in the United States, founded as the U.S. Taxpayers Party in 1992. ...

Contents


Teaching and activism

Foster was born and raised in Louisiana, and earned a master's degree from Texas Southern University. In 1960, she moved to Los Angeles, where she was a public high school teacher for 33 years - teaching typing, business courses, and sometimes English classes. State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455 km² (16%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,468,976 (22nd)  - Density 39. ... Texas Southern University is a university in Houston, Texas, USA, which is a historically black college. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... High school, or Secondary school, is the last segment of compulsory education in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan (Republic of China) (only junior high school), the United Kingdom and the United States. ...


She had sought public office prior to 2000 - as a Democrat in the 1970s and as a Republican candidate for California State Assembly in 1984. In the 1980s, she became an outspoken opponent of pornography, sex education, AIDS education, and gay rights, and founded "Black Americans for Family Values." She was arrested in 1987 with several other women while disrupting the state Republican convention to protest its recognition of the Log Cabin Club, an organization of gay Republicans. In 1992, she was a staunch defender of the police officers in the Rodney King beating case, and organized a testimonial dinner for Laurence Powell, one of the convicted officers, in 1995. This article is about the year 2000. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The California State Assembly is the lower house of the California State Legislature. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφια pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) (also informally referred to as porn or porno) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ... Sex education is education about sexual reproduction in human beings, sexual intercourse and other aspects of human sexual behavior. ... The Red Ribbon is used internationally to symbolize the fight against AIDS AIDS is an acronym for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the depletion of the immune system caused by infection with HIV. Although treatments... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Log Cabin Republican poster, with the typical use of Abraham Lincoln The Log Cabin Republicans is a political organization in the United States, consisting of gay, lesbian and bisexual supporters of the Republican Party. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) was an African-American motorist who, while videotaped by a bystander (George Holliday), was beaten repeatedly by Los Angeles police officers (LAPD) during a police stop on March 3, 1991. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1994, while teaching typing at Bell High School in Los Angeles, Foster was a public advocate of Proposition 187, a California ballot initiative to deny social services, health care, and public education to illegal immigrants. Her position was extremely unpopular at the school where she taught, which was 90 percent Hispanic. In 1996, after she argued on PBS's "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" that illegal immigration was responsible for the low quality of Los Angeles schools, some of her colleagues at the school condemned her in an open letter. Two days later, she attended an anti-immigration rally where several of her supporters were attacked by members of the Progressive Labor Party, who allegedly wanted to harm Foster herself. Shortly thereafter, she left her job, which she calls a necessity resulting from her treatment at work. She went on speaking tours for the John Birch Society and took workers' compensation for an undisclosed mental disorder -- which she describes as "stress" and "anxiety" -- until her official retirement as a teacher in 1998. 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... -1... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize U.S. immigrants for whose background hail from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or the original settlers of the traditionally Spanish-held Southwestern United States whereas immigrants from Spain are considered European. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The Progressive Labor Party (originally the Progressive Labor Movement, sometimes still referred to simply as PL) is a communist party based in the United States. ... The John Birch Society (JBS) is a right-wing conservative organization that was founded in 1958 to fight the perceived threat of Communism in the United States. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


2000 campaign

Pat Buchanan selected Foster as his running-mate after several other candidates such as Jim Traficant and James P. Hoffa declined his offer. Foster, who had supported Buchanan's campaigns in 1992 and 1996, quit her speaking tour to join the race. While Buchanan was hospitalized during part of the campaign, Foster was the ticket's mouthpiece, campaigning through television and radio appearances. Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), is an American author, syndicated columnist, and television commentator. ... James Traficant James A. Traficant Jr. ... James P. Hoffa (born May 19, 1941) is the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


The issue of her workers' compensation claim was raised during the campaign and led to questions about her mental state. She responded that she had filed the claim for stress and anxiety, and did not release her records.


Personal

Foster is Catholic. Her first marriage, by which she has a son, ended in annulment, she says, when she found out that her husband was a convicted felon. Later, in 1977, she married Chuck Foster, a truck driver. They have two adult children. Foster is a grandmother. She lives in Los Angeles. Annulment is a legal procedure for declaring a marriage null and void. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ...


Books

What's Right for All Americans (1995) 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Quotations

  • "This idea that you come to school hungry -- come on! It's crazy! It's just so they can bring in all these lunch programs, breakfast programs -- next, it's going to be dinner! . . . That's not the job of the schools -- to feed the children. Let them pay for it or let them bring their own."
  • "The illegals come over [the Arizona border] into the ranches. They kill their cattle. They rape their children. The children can't play in the yard anymore."
  • "These mental health programs are another thing that needs to be booted out of our schools! Every time there's a tragedy, they have to send for grief counselors. How totally ridiculous!"

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Negro means black in both Spanish and Portuguese languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 // Racial segregation is a kind of formalized or institutionalized discrimination on the basis of race. ... The Southern United States or the South constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... A depiction of Thomas D. Rices Jim Crow In the United States, the so-called Jim Crow laws were made to enforce racial segregation, and included laws that would prevent African Americans from doing things that a white person could do. ... A Black person drinks out of a water fountain designated for black people in 1939 at a streetcar terminal. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Enslaved redirects here. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... State nickname: The Grand Canyon State, The Copper State Other U.S. States Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Governor Janet Napolitano (D) Official languages English Only State Area 295,254 km² (6th)  - Land 294,312 km²  - Water 942 km² (0. ...

Sources

External link


Preceded by:
Pat Choate
Reform Party Vice Presidential candidate
2000 (lost)
Succeeded by:
Peter Camejo


Patrick Jeffrey Pat Choate was the 1996 Reform Party of the United States of America Vice President candidate. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues--and... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Peter Miguel Camejo (born December 31, 1939) is a financier, businessman, political activist, environmentalist, author, and one of the founders of the socially responsible investment movement. ...


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