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Encyclopedia > Expedition 6
Expedition 6
Mission insignia
Expedition 6 insignia
Mission statistics
Mission name: Expedition 6
Call sign: Expedition 6
Number of crew: 3
Launch Date: November 24, 2002 00:49:47 UTC
Launch Vehicle: Endeavour STS-113
Landing Date: May 4, 2003 02:04:25 UTC
Landing Vehicle: Soyuz TMA-1
Time Docked: 156 days 00:44
EVA Duration: 13 h 17 min
Mission Duration: 161 days 01:14:38
Number of orbits: 2,536
Distance traveled: ~107,824,795 km
Mass: 187,016 kg
Crew picture

Expedition 6 crew portrait
L-R: Donald Pettit (U.S.A.), Ken Bowersox (U.S.A.), and Nikolai Budarin (Russia) Image File history File links Expedition_6_insignia. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-105) is the fifth and final operational NASA space shuttle to be built. ... STS-113 was a 14-day mission in November and December 2002 during which Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew extended the International Space Stations backbone and exchanged the Expedition Five and Six crews. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... Crew Launched: Sergei Zalyotin (2) Frank De Winne (1) - ESA (Belgium) Yuri Lonchakov (2) Landed ISS Expedition 6 Crew: Nikolai Budarin (1) Kenneth Bowersox (5) - U.S.A. Donald Pettit (1) - U.S.A. Mission Parameters Mass: ? kg Perigee: 193 km Apogee: 235 km Inclination: 51. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless on an untethered EVA Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is work done by an astronaut away from the Earth and outside of his or her spacecraft. ... In physics, an orbit is the path that an object makes, around another object, whilst under the influence of a source of centripetal force, such as gravity. ... ISS Expedition 6 crew (NASA) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Donald Pettit Donald Roy Pettit (born 20 April 1955) is an American astronaut, a veteran of a six month stay aboard the International Space Station. ... External link NASA Biography Categories: Stub | United States astronauts | Crew members of ISS Expeditions | Naval aviators | U.S. Navy officers | 1956 births ... Nikolai Budarin Nikolai Mikhailovich Budarin (Russian: Николай Михайлович Бударин) (born April 29, 1953 in Kirya, Chuvashia) is a Russian cosmonaut, a veteran of three extended space missions aboard the Mir Space Station and the International Space Station. ...

Expedition 6 Crew

Contents


Crew

(1) number of spaceflights each crew member has completed, including this mission. External link NASA Biography Categories: Stub | United States astronauts | Crew members of ISS Expeditions | Naval aviators | U.S. Navy officers | 1956 births ... Nikolai Budarin Nikolai Mikhailovich Budarin (Russian: Николай Михайлович Бударин) (born April 29, 1953 in Kirya, Chuvashia) is a Russian cosmonaut, a veteran of three extended space missions aboard the Mir Space Station and the International Space Station. ... Donald Pettit Donald Roy Pettit (born 20 April 1955) is an American astronaut, a veteran of a six month stay aboard the International Space Station. ...


Mission Parameters


Aurora Borealis and the Manicouagan Impact Crater reservoir (foreground) in Quebec, Canada photographed during Expedition Six. (NASA)
Aurora Borealis and the Manicouagan Impact Crater reservoir (foreground) in Quebec, Canada photographed during Expedition Six. (NASA)


This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... Inclination is one of the six orbital parameters describing the shape and orientation of a celestial orbit and is the angular distance of the orbital plane from the plane of the reference (usually planets equator or the ecliptic), stated in degrees. ... The orbital period is the time it takes a planet (or another object) to make one full orbit. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aurora Borealis over Canada photographed by Expedition Six. ... Aurora Borealis over Canada photographed by Expedition Six. ...


Mission Objectives

The Station's sixth crew was launched to the Station aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour STS-113 in November 2002. The mission was expected to be a four-month mission that was to end in March 2003 when Atlantis STS-114 was to fly to the Station with the Expedition 7 crew. The Columbia disaster changed plans and the crew stayed on the station until May 2003. They returned to earth on Soyuz TMA-1 and the Expedition 7 crew was delivered to the ISS on Soyuz TMA-2. The Space Shuttle was expected to be grounded for up to 2 years. Ongoing logistical support for the ISS must now be carried out by Soyuz and Progress flights until the Space Shuttle can be returned to flight. STS-113 was a 14-day mission in November and December 2002 during which Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew extended the International Space Stations backbone and exchanged the Expedition Five and Six crews. ... STS-114 was the Return to Flight Space Shuttle mission which launched Space Shuttle Discovery at 10:39 EDT (14:39 UTC), July 26, 2005. ... Mission Statistics Mission Name: Expedition 7 Call Sign: Expedition 7 Number of Crew: 2 Launch: April 26, 2003 03:53:52 UTC Baikonur LC1 Apogee: 396 km Perigee: 384 km Period: 92 min Inclination: 51. ... Crew Launched: Sergei Zalyotin (2) Frank De Winne (1) - ESA (Belgium) Yuri Lonchakov (2) Landed ISS Expedition 6 Crew: Nikolai Budarin (1) Kenneth Bowersox (5) - U.S.A. Donald Pettit (1) - U.S.A. Mission Parameters Mass: ? kg Perigee: 193 km Apogee: 235 km Inclination: 51. ... Mission Statistics Mission Name: Expedition 7 Call Sign: Expedition 7 Number of Crew: 2 Launch: April 26, 2003 03:53:52 UTC Baikonur LC1 Apogee: 396 km Perigee: 384 km Period: 92 min Inclination: 51. ... Soyuz TMA-2 launch Crew Launched ISS Expedition 7 Crew: Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko (3) Edward Tsang Lu (3) - U.S.A. Landed ISS Expedition 7 Crew: Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko (3) Edward Tsang Lu (3) - U.S.A. Pedro Duque (1) - ESA (Spain) Mission Parameters Mass: 7136 kg Perigee: 200 km...


The sixth crew of the International Space Station returned to Earth just after 10 p.m. EDT on May 3, the first time U.S. astronauts have landed in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ...


Russian Mission Control reported at approximately 2:45 a.m. May 4 that the support helicopters reached the crew and all three astronauts were in good health. The capsule appeared to touch down about 276 miles (444 km) from its planned landing zone. May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ...


Spacewalks

The Expedition Six crew conducted two spacewalks during its stay at the International Space Station. Both were based out of the Quest Airlock, and the spacewalkers used U.S. spacesuits, which are called Extravehicular Mobility Units, or EMUs. The crew was originally scheduled to conduct only one spacewalk, but a second was added to the manifest for April 8 in order to prepare for future assembly missions. April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ...


The two Expedition Six extravehicular activities bring the total number of spacewalks conducted in support of ISS assembly and maintenance to 51. Twenty-six have been based out of the station, with 17 staged from Quest. Bowersox and Pettit accumulated 13 hours and 17 minutes of spacewalking time at the station.


Spacewalk 1
Ken Bowersox, Don Pettit
Time: 6 hours, 51 minutes
Start time: 6:50 a.m. CST (1250 GMT) 15 January 2003
End time: 1:41 p.m. CST (1941 GMT) 15 January 2003 January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bowersox and Pettit continued outfitting and activating the International Space Station's newest component, the P1 (P-One) Truss. The P1's radiator assembly was a major focus during the spacewalk. Bowersox and Pettit released the remaining launch locks on the radiator assembly, which allowed the radiator assembly to be deployed. Other scheduled tasks completed included removing some debris that was on a sealing ring on the Unity Module's Earth-facing docking port, and they tested an ammonia reservoir on the station's P6 Truss. They were unable to complete one scheduled task -- the installation of a light fixture on one of the station's Crew and Equipment Translation Aid, or CETA, carts. The fixture's attachment will be rescheduled for a future spacewalk.


To complete the spacewalk, Bowersox and Pettit cut away a thermal cover strap that apparently interfered with the rotation of the Quest Airlock's hatch and delayed the start of the extravehicular activity.


Spacewalk 2
Ken Bowersox, Don Pettit
Time: 6 hours, 26 minutes
Start time: 7:40 a.m. CDT (1240 GMT) April 8, 2003
End time: 2:06 p.m. CDT (1906 GMT) April 8, 2003 April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bowersox and Pettit reconfigured cables on the S0 (S-Zero), S1 and P1 Trusses for future Integrated Truss Structure component deliveries and replaced a Power Control Module on the Mobile Transporter. They provided Control Moment Gyro No. 2 with a redundant power channel capability by rerouting cables. Then, they installed Spool Positioning Devices on Destiny Laboratory heat exchangers and reinstalled a thermal cover on an S1 Radiator Beam Valve Module. Bowersox and Pettit also unfurled a light stanchion on the CETA cart that did not unfurl properly during their first spacewalk.



International Space Station International Space Station Patch
Expedition 1 | Expedition 2 | Expedition 3 | Expedition 4 | Expedition 5 | Expedition 6 |Expedition 7 | Expedition 8 | Expedition 9 | Expedition 10 | Expedition 11 | Expedition 12 | Expedition 13

  Results from FactBites:
 
Expedition 6 Information (624 words)
The Station's sixth crew was launched to the Station aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour STS-113 in November 2002.
The mission was expected to be a four-month mission that was to end in March 2003 when Atlantis STS-114 was to fly to the Station with the Expedition 7 crew.
The two Expedition Six extravehicular activities bring the total number of spacewalks conducted in support of ISS assembly and maintenance to 51.
Expedition 11 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (514 words)
Expedition 11 (2005) is the 11th expedition to the International Space Station, using the Soyuz TMA-6, which stayed during the expedition for emergency evacuation.
European Space Agency Italian Astronaut Roberto Vittori launched with Expedition 11 on the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft and returned April 24, 2005 with Expedition 10 on Soyuz TMA-5.
On September 7, the unpiloted Progress spacecraft 53 (P18) undocked from the station and was deorbited, to make way for the arrival of Progress 54 (P19) which docked on 2005 September 10 and transferred around 2300 kg of cargo, (fuel, water, and dry cargo including oxygen generators) to the station.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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