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Encyclopedia > Exeter College, Oxford
Colleges and halls of the University of Oxford
Exeter College

The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1645x2162, 1242 KB) Summary Exeter College, Oxford. ...

                     
College name Exeter College
Latin name Collegium Exoniense
Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter
Established 1314
Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Rector Ms Frances Cairncross
JCR president Edward Moores
Undergraduates 299
MCR president Sara Adams
Graduates 150


Location of Exeter College within central OxfordCoordinates: 51°45′14″N 1°15′22″W / 51.753871, -1.256046
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Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England and the 4th oldest college of the University. The main entrance is on the east side of Turl Street. As of 2006, the college had an estimated financial endowment of £47m. [1] Walter de Stapledon (February 1, 1261 - October 15, 1326), English bishop, was born at Annery in North Devon. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... of the Emmanuel College College name Emmanuel College Named after Jesus Christ (Emmanuel) Established 1584 Location St Andrews Street Admittance Men and women Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Undergraduates 500 Graduates 100 Sister college Exeter College, Oxford College Website Boat Club Wesite Emmanuel front court and the Wren... Frances Anne Cairncross CBE (born 30 August 1944, Otley, England) is a British economist, journalist and academic. ... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... Image File history File links Blue_pog. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Looking south along Turl Street towards All Saints with Lincoln College on the left. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...

Contents

History

Still situated in its original location on Turl Street, Exeter College was founded in 1314 by Walter de Stapeldon of Devon, Bishop of Exeter and later treasurer to Edward II, as a school to educate clergy. During its first century, it was known as Stapeldon Hall and was significantly smaller, with just twelve to fourteen students. The college grew significantly from the 15th century onward, and began offering rooms to its students. The College motto is "Floreat Exon", meaning "Let Exeter Flourish". Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Walter de Stapledon (February 1, 1261 - October 15, 1326), English bishop, was born at Annery in North Devon. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...

The stained glass of the Exeter College Chapel
The stained glass of the Exeter College Chapel

In the 16th century, donations from Sir William Petre, a former Exeter graduate, helped to expand and transform the college. As a result, Exeter College became one of the leading colleges in the University. The present Hall was built in the year 1618 with the rest of the college completed by 1710, with the exception of the old gatehouse, Palmer's Tower, which dates from 1432. In the 18th century the college experienced declining popularity, as did all of Oxford's other colleges. University reforms in the 1850s helped to end this period of stagnation. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2116x2140, 1869 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Exeter College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2116x2140, 1869 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Exeter College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... William Petre was born in 1505 and educated at Exeter College, Oxford. ... For a bill proposed in USA in 1998, see Bill 1618. ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ...


The college saw much building work during the 1850s to the designs of Sir George Gilbert Scott, including the chapel (1854-60, inspired by the Sainte Chapelle in Paris), the library 1856, also in a 13th century style, the rector's lodgings from 1857 in Georgian style, and the Broad Street range from 1856.[2] // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Sainte-Chapelle surrounded by the Palais de Justice. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Historical view of Broad Street looking east towards (left to right) the Clarendon Building, and the Sheldonian Theatre and the Old Ashmolean Building. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The college expanded again in the 20th century when it acquired new buildings, thereby enabling it to accommodate more undergraduate students. Until 1978 the college did not allow women students, but in 1993 Exeter College became the first of the former all-male colleges to elect a woman, Marilyn Butler, as its Rector. When Butler's tenure expired in October 2004, the college elected another woman – Frances Cairncross, former Senior Editor of The Economist – as Rector. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Marilyn Butler is a literary critic and was Rector of Exeter College, Oxford from 1993 to 2004. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Frances Anne Cairncross CBE (born 30 August 1944, Otley, England) is a British economist, journalist and academic. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


Student life

As one of the smaller Oxford Colleges, Exeter has a reputation for having a close-knit student body, and Common Rooms that are noted for their friendliness and openness to new students. First year undergraduates are housed on-site in the College’s Turl St. site, and there is dedicated Graduate accommodation for the college on Iffley Road. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to...


As the University’s fourth oldest college, a certain emphasis is placed on tradition, especially during special occasions such as the annual ‘Burns’ Night,’ a dinner in honour of the Scottish poet Robert Burns, when a traditional meal of haggis is always served. The College’s ties with Williams College in the United States, as well as the generally international composition of the MCR makes the annual Thanksgiving dinner a popular occasion as well. The MCR hosts a large number of married students, and non-studying spouses are encouraged to actively participate in the life of college. This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... For the chain gang fugitive and author from Georgia, see Robert Elliott Burns. ... an uncooked small haggis Haggis is a traditional Scottish dish. ... Williams College is a private, liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Thanksgiving (disambiguation). ...


The MCR hosts a large number of specialists in Law and Byzantine studies, and the JCR has a high concentration of students reading the popular Modern History and PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics) degrees. However, like most other Oxford colleges no single discipline can be said to dominate either common room, and the atmosphere is one of a great deal of interdisciplinary mingling. For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) is a popular interdisciplinary degree which combines study from the three eponymous disciplines. ... A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ...


Like all Oxford Colleges Exeter prides itself on its athletic achievements as well as its academic: in 2005/2006 Exeter students competed at a University level on the varsity Lacrosse, football, Golf, Fencing, Rugby, Powerlifting, Gymnastics, Darts, Ice Hockey and Wine Tasting teams. It also fields several teams on an intra-university college level, particularly in rowing. For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Powerlifting is a strength sport, consisting of three events: the squat, the bench press, and the deadlift. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... For the British doo-wop revival band of the 1970s and 1980s, see Darts (band). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Wine degustation is the tasting of wine. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ...


The college also places an emphasis on preparing students for their future careers once they leave the university. Unusually for an Oxford college, Exeter boasts a dedicated Careers Office and internship programme, with links to a wide range of companies around the globe. The college’s Development Office works not only to help fund the college but also to provide networking opportunities for students through its alumni contacts, and through its annual ‘City Drinks.’ For information about a medical intern, see the article on Medical residency. ... Not to be confused with social network services such as MySpace, etc. ...


Notable former students

See also Former students of Exeter College, Oxford

Tariq Ali Tariq Ali (Urdu: طارق علی) (born October 21, 1943) is a British-Pakistani writer and filmmaker [1]. He is a member of the editorial committee of the New Left Review, and regularly contributes to The Guardian, Counterpunch, and the London Review of Books, He is the author of Pirates Of... Roger Alton is the editor of the British national newspaper, The Observer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... A rough picture of Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (July 22, 1621 – January 21, 1683) was a prominent English politician of the Interregnum and during the reign of King Charles II. Cooper, born in the county of Dorset, suffered the death of both... Bannister was chosen as the first Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year for his accomplishments in 1954. ... 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The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Reeta Chakrabarti (born 1964) is a political correspondent for the BBC Televisions Breakfast programme shown on BBC1 and BBC News 24 channels. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Edgar Frank Ted Codd (August 23, 1923 – April 18, 2003) was a British computer scientist who made seminal contributions to the theory of relational databases. ... A relational database is a database that conforms to the relational model, and refers to a databases data and schema (the databases structure of how that data is arranged). ... Harold Davidson Harold Francis Davidson (July 14, 1875 – July 30, 1937), sometimes known as The Prostitutes Padre, was a British Church of England Rector, who was famous as the Rector of Stiffkey defrocked in 1932 for his licentious lifestyle, though this has been disputed by his descendants. ... Sir John Eliot (April 11, 1592 - November 27, 1632), English statesman, son of Richard Eliot (1546 - June 22, 1609) and Bridget Carswell (c. ... John Ford (baptized April 17, 1586 - c. ... Sir John Fortescue (c. ... John Gardner, CBE (born 1917 in Manchester, England) is an English composer of classical music. ... Dr. John Gray John Gray (born 1948), is a prominent British political philosopher and author, currently School Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics. ... Frederic Russell Harty (5 September 1934 – 8 June 1988) was an English television presenter with a distinctly camp turn of phrase; his name has been used as Cockney rhyming slang for party. ... Liaquat Ali Khan Liaquat Ali Khan Nawabzaada Khan Liaquat Ali Khan (October 1, 1896 – October 16, 1951) was the first Prime Minister of Pakistan. ... Charles Lyell The frontispiece from Principles of Geology Sir Charles Lyell, 1st Baronet, KT, (November 14, 1797 – February 22, 1875) was a Scottish lawyer, geologist, and populariser of uniformitarianism. ... Lady Flora Mary McDonnell (born 7 November 1963), now called Lady Flora Pennybacker, is an Anglo-Irish aristocrat, the eldest child of Alexander Randal Mark McDonnell, 9th Earl of Antrim and Sarah Elizabeth Anne Harmsworth. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... Alfred Noyes (September 16, 1880 – June 28, 1958) was an English poet, best known for his ballads The Highwayman (1906) and The Barrel Organ. ... Joseph Nye (born 1937) is the founder, along with Robert Keohane, of the international relations theory neoliberalism (international relations) developed in their 1977 book Power and Interdependence. ... Francis Turner Palgrave (September 28, 1824 - October 24, 1897) was a British critic and poet. ... Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (February 27, 1848 – October 7, 1918) was an English composer, probably best known for his setting of William Blakes poem, Jerusalem. ... Sir Edward Evan (E. E.) Evans-Pritchard (September 21, 1902 – September 11, 1973) was a British anthropologist instrumental in the development of social anthropology in that country. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... The trilogy (U.K versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... Qian Zhongshu (November 21, 1910 – December 19, 1998) was a Chinese literary scholar, writer and polyglot, famous for his burning wit and formiddable erudition. ... Paul William Roberts is a Canadian writer who lives in Toronto, Ontario. ... This article is about British radio presenter and television presenter. ... Will Self William Self (born September 26, 1961) is an English novelist, reviewer and columnist. ... Edward George Sherrin (18 February 1931 – 1 October 2007) was an English broadcaster, author and stage director. ... Imogen Stubbs, Lady Nunn (born 20 February 1961) is a British actress. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... This article is about the novel. ... Wynford Vaughan-Thomas (1908-1987) was born Wynford Lewis John Thomas in Swansea in 1908. ... Nicholas Thomas Tom Wright (b. ... The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... The Church of England logo since 1996. ...

Prominent academics/tutors

See also Fellows of Exeter College, Oxford

Frank Close OBE is currently Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford. ... Professor Raymond Dwek FRS was the founding scientist of Oxford GlycoSciences PLC. He was educated at the University of Manchester where he read Chemistry (1960-64), and went to the University of Oxford and completed his DPhil in Physical Chemistry in 1966. ... The Rev. ... Michael Hart (born 1956) has been Fellow in Politics at Exeter College, Oxford since 1982. ... Elizabeth Jeffreys is the Bywater and Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Literature at the University of Oxford. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Professor Jacob Klein, former holder of the Herman Mark Chair of Polymer Physics in the Materials and Interfaces Department at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, is the Dr Lees Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford. ... George Alfred Kolkhorst (1897-1958) was an Oxford don. ... Dr John Maddicott has published works on the political and social history of England in the thirteenth and fourteenth century, and on Anglo-Saxon history. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... Canon George Rawlinson (23 November 1812 – 7 October 1902), was a 19th century English scholar and historian. ... Andrew Steane is Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford. ... Helen Watanabe-OKelly is the Fellow and Tutor in German at Exeter College, Oxford. ... German literature comprises those literary texts originating within Germany proper and written in the German language. ...

Rectors of Exeter College

see List of Rectors of Exeter College

In fiction

Exeter College is the real-life basis for the fictional Jordan College in Philip Pullman's novel trilogy His Dark Materials. The 2007 film version of the first novel, The Golden Compass (originally Northern Lights), used the college for location filming.[3] Jordan College is a fictional college of the University of Oxford which appears in the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... The trilogy (U.K versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... The Golden Compass is a forthcoming fantasy film based upon Northern Lights (titled The Golden Compass in the US), the first novel in Philip Pullmans trilogy His Dark Materials, slated for release on December 5, 2007 by New Line Cinema. ... The Golden Compass redirects here. ...


In the 1997 novel Great Apes by Will Self, an old Exonian, the author imagines an Earth where chimpanzees have evolved as the dominant, sentient species. One scene is set in Exeter College Hall, where the chimpanzee dons rampage around the High Table, showing in their conversation the very high intelligence to be expected of Oxford academics, but all the while exhibiting in their behaviour the manners and habits of chimpanzees. Will Self William Self (born September 26, 1961) is an English novelist, reviewer and columnist. ...


In the final Morse episode, "The Remorseful Day", Inspector Morse collapses from a heart attack in the front quadrangle as Fauré's In Paradisum is being sung in chapel.[4] Morse (left) as played by John Thaw in the television adaption (with Kevin Whately as Lewis (right)). Detective Chief Inspector Morse is a fictional character, who features in a series of thirteen detective novels by British author Colin Dexter, though he is better known for the 33 episode TV series... Gabriel Urbain Fauré (May 12, 1845 – November 4, 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist, and teacher. ... Cover of the vocal score to the Requiem, published by Oxford University Press Gabriel Fauré composed his Requiem in D minor, Op. ...


Williams College

There has been a close relationship with Williams College in the United States for many years, the Williams-Exeter Programme. Twenty six to thirty undergraduates from Williams spend their junior year at Exeter with full undergraduate privileges, but live together with a Williams faculty proctor in special housing in North Oxford. Courses taken at Exeter College count for full credit at Williams. Williams College is a private, liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... North Oxford, especially central North Oxford between the city centre and Summertown, is considered by many to be the most desirable and famous suburb of Oxford, England. ...


References

  1. ^ Oxford College Endowment Incomes, 1973-2006 (updated July 2007)
  2. ^ Nikolaus Pevsner and Jennifer Sherwood: The Buildings of England: Oxfordshire, 1974 pp. 136-7.
  3. ^ Filming locations for His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass. IMDb locations page. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  4. ^ Leonard, Bill, The Oxford of Inspector Morse Location Guides, Oxford (2004) pp. 77 and 79. ISBN 0-9547671-1-X.

Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ... Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Exeter College, Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (491 words)
Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
The college saw much building work during the 1850s to the designs of Sir George Gilbert Scott, including the chapel (1854-60, inspired by the Sainte Chapelle in Paris), the library 1856, also in a 13th century style, the rector's lodgings from 1857 in Georgian style, and the Broad Street range from 1856.
The Exeter College quadrangle was used as the location for Inspector Morse's death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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