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Encyclopedia > Exeter Cathedral
The west front.

Contents

Exeter Cathedral in Exeter (England) from the west, taken in the summer of 2003 by Robert Brewer (rbrwr) and licenced under the GFDL and cc-by-sa. ... Exeter Cathedral in Exeter (England) from the west, taken in the summer of 2003 by Robert Brewer (rbrwr) and licenced under the GFDL and cc-by-sa. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 800 pixel, file size: 452 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Exeter Cathedral... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 800 pixel, file size: 452 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Exeter Cathedral...

History

The founding of the cathedral at Exeter, dedicated to Saint Peter, dates from 1050, when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. A Saxon minster already existing within the town (and dedicated to Saint Mary and Saint Peter) was used by Bishop Leofric as his seat, but services were often held out of doors, close to the site of the present cathedral building. In 1107, William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style. Its official foundation was in 1133, after Warelwast's time, but it took many more years to complete. Following the appointment of Walter Bronescombe as bishop in 1258, the building was already recognized as outmoded, and it was rebuilt in the Decorated Gothic style, following the example of nearby Salisbury. However, much of the Norman building was kept, including the two massive square towers and part of the walls. It was constructed entirely of local stone, including Purbeck marble. The new cathedral was complete by about 1400, apart from the addition of the chapter house and chantry chapels. A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ... A number of other places have taken their names from Exeter The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at 50° 43 25 N, 3° 31 39 W. In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... Leofric becomes Bishop of Exeter Hedeby is sacked by King Harald Hardraade of Norway during the course of a conflict with King Eric Estridsson of Denmark. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... The Bishop of Exeter is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Exeter in the Province of Canterbury. ... Crediton is a town in Devon, England. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... Leofric (1016 - 1072) was born in Devon, England, and died there, in Exeter, on 10 February, 1072. ... Events William Warelwast becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... William de Warelwast[1] (d. ... William I of England (c. ... The nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave is a forerunner of the Gothic style. ... Events Geoffrey of Monmouth produces the Historia Regum Britanniae Durham Cathedral is completed Construction of Exeter Cathedral begun June 4 - Lothair III is crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Innocent II Births March 5 - King Henry II of England (died 1189) Honen Shonin, Japanese founder of Pure Land Buddhism (died 1212... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Salisbury Cathedral in the early morning light. ... Purbeck is a local government district in Dorset, England, named for the Isle of Purbeck. ... Events Henry IV quells baron rebellion and executes The Earls of Kent, Huntingdon and Salisbury for their attempt to have Richard II of England restored as King Jean Froissart writes the Chronicles Medici family becomes powerful in Florence, Italy Births December 25 - John Sutton, 1st Baron Dudley, Lord Lieutenant of... A chapter house is a building or room attached to a cathedral or collegiate church in which meetings are held. ... Chantry is a term for the English establishment of a shrine or chapel on private land where monks or priests would say (or chant) prayers on a fixed schedule, usually for someone who had died. ...


Like most English cathedrals, Exeter suffered during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, but not as much as it would have done had it been a monastic foundation. Further damage was done during the English Civil War, when the cloisters were destroyed. Following the restoration of Charles II, a magnificent new pipe organ was built in the cathedral by John Loosemore. During the Victorian era, some refurbishment was carried out by George Gilbert Scott. The bombing of the city in World War II caused considerable damage to the cathedral, including the loss of most of the stained glass. Subsequent repairs and the clearance of the area around the western end of the building uncovered portions of earlier structures, including remains of the Roman city and of the original Norman cathedral. Notable features of the interior include the great clock, the minstrels' gallery, and the ceiling bosses, one of which depicts the murder of Thomas à Becket. Because there is no centre tower, Exeter Cathedral has the longest uninterrupted vaulted ceiling in England. The Dissolution of the Monasteries, referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the formal process during the English Reformation by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the monastic institutions in England between 1538 and 1541. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A Cloister is part of cathedrals and abbeys architecture. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany // The pipe organ (Greek ὄργανον, órganon) is a musical instrument that produces sound by admitting pressurized air through a series of pipes. ... John Loosemore (August, 1616 - April 18, 1681) was an English builder of pipe organs. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... (St. ...

The clock

The clock.
The clock.

The clock is one of the group of famous 14th to 16th century astronomical clocks to be found in the West of England. (See also Salisbury, Wells Cathedral, Ottery St Mary, and Wimborne Minster.) The main, lower, dial is the oldest part of the clock, probably dating from the 1480s. The fleur-de-lys 'hand' indicates the time (and the position of the sun in the sky) on a 24 hour analog dial. The numbering consists of two sets of I-XII Roman numerals. The silver ball and inner dial shows both the age of the moon and its phase (using a rotating black shield to indicate the moon's phase). The upper dial, added in the 1760s, shows the minutes. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (500x692, 202 KB) photograph of Exeter, Devon Cathedral clock taken by me in July 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (500x692, 202 KB) photograph of Exeter, Devon Cathedral clock taken by me in July 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Salisbury (IPA: , or — moving from RP to local dialect) is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... The west front, completed c. ... Map sources for Ottery St Mary at grid reference SY099955 Ottery St Mary is a town in Devon, England, on the River Otter, about ten miles east of Exeter. ... The Minster Wimborne Minster is a market town in the East Dorset district of Dorset in South West England and the name of the church in that town. ... Fleur de Lys is a Canadian superheroine created in 1984 by Mark Shainblum and Gabriel Morrissette. ... a cheap Vostok 24 hour watch reading 09:54 The clock at Ottery St Mary. ... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ...


The Latin phrase Pereunt et Imputantur, a favourite motto for clocks and sundials first penned by the Latin poet Martial in the poem "Character of a happy life", is usually translated as "they perish and are reckoned to our account", referring to the hours that we spend, wisely or not. Wall sundial Wall sundial in Warsaws Old Town A sundial measures time by the position of the sun. ... Marcus Valerius Martialis, known in English as Martial, was a Latin poet from Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva and Trajan. ...


The original clockwork mechanism, much modified, repaired, and neglected until it was replaced in the early 20th century, can be seen on the floor below, usually underneath a pile of chairs.


Organ and Organists

Organ

The Cathedral organ stands proud and imposing on the ornate medieval screen, preserving the old classical distinction between quire and nave with marked grandeur. The largest pipes, the lower octave of the 32ft Contra Violone, stand just inside the south transept. The organ also boasts one of the very few trompette militaire stops in the country (the only other examples to be found in the British Isles are in Liverpool's Anglican and London's St Paul's Cathedrals), housed in the minstrels' gallery, along with a chorus of diapason pipes. The choir stalls in the quire of Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England A quire is the area of a church where the choir sits, also known as the choir. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Cathedral ground plan. ... The trompette militaire is a lourd majestic sounding organ stop. ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ...


Details of the organ from the National Pipe Organ Register


Organists

  • 1584 Matthew Godwin
  • 1591 Arthur Cocke
  • 1609 John Lugge
  • 1665 Theodore Coleby
  • 1674 Henry Hall
  • 1686 Peter Passmore and John White
  • 1693 Richard Henman
  • 1741 John Silvester
  • 1753 Richard Langdon
  • 1777 William Jackson
  • 1804 James Paddon
  • 1835 Samuel Sebastian Wesley
  • 1842 Alfred Angel
  • 1876 Daniel Joseph Wood
  • 1919 Ernest Bullock
  • 1928 Thomas Armstrong
  • 1933 Alfred Wilcock
  • 1953 Reginald Moore
  • 1957 Lionel Dakers
  • 1973 Lucian Nethsingha
  • 1999 Andrew Millington

Samuel Sebastian Wesley (14 August 1810 — 19 April 1876) was an English organist and composer. ... Sir Ernest Bullock (15 September 1890, Wigan, England – 24 May 1979, Aylesbury, England) was an English organist, composer, and educator. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Exeter Cathedral
List of Anglican Cathedrals in the United Kingdom and Ireland
Anglican Communion


Coordinates: 50.722313° N 3.529561° W The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Exeter Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (399 words)
The founding of the cathedral at Exeter, dedicated to Saint Peter, dates from 1050, when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids.
The new cathedral was complete by about 1400, apart from the addition of the chapter house and chantry chapels.
Like most English cathedrals, Exeter suffered during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, but not as much as it would have done had it been a monastic foundation.
Exeter: Definition and Much More From Answers.com (2310 words)
Because of its strategic location, Exeter was besieged by the Danes in the 9th and 11th cent., by William the Conqueror in 1068, by Yorkists in the 15th cent., and by religious factions in the middle of the 16th cent.
Exeter was also a port: the limit of tides of the River Exe lies below Exeter, and the small town of Topsham on the estuary (nowadays within the city limits) developed as a port for the city, but goods were transported to the city's quays in lighters.
Exeter was at first a Parliamentary town in the English Civil War in the largely Royalist South West, but it was captured by the Royalists on the 4th of September 1643 and it remained in their control until near the end of the war.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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