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Encyclopedia > Execution by firing squad
The Third of May by Francisco Goya
The Third of May by Francisco Goya

Execution by firing squad is a method of capital punishment, particularly common in times of war. The firing squad is generally composed of several soldiers or peace officers. The method of execution requires all members of the group to fire simultaneously, thus preventing both disruption of the process by a single member and identification of the member who fired the lethal shot. The condemned is typically blindfolded or hooded, as well as restrained. Executions can be carried out with the condemned either standing or sitting. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1551, 206 KB) Description: Title: de: Erschießung der Aufständischen am 3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1551, 206 KB) Description: Title: de: Erschießung der Aufständischen am 3. ... “Goya” redirects here. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... In the fire service a Squad is a Engine Company with a compliment of rescue tools. ... This article is about a military rank. ... Peace officer is a North American term for any public sector person charged to uphold the peace. ... A blindfold is a strip of cloth used to cover the eyes, rendering the user effectively (but temporarily) blind. ... A hood is a kind of headgear. ...


In some cases, one member of the firing squad is issued a weapon containing a blank cartridge instead of one with a bullet, without telling any of them to whom it has been given. This is believed to reduce flinching by individual members of the firing squad, making the execution process more reliable. It also allows each member of the firing squad a chance to believe afterward that he did not personally fire a fatal shot. This reinforces the sense of diffusion of responsibility. While an experienced marksman can tell the difference between a blank and a live cartridge based on the recoil (the blank will have much lower recoil), there is a significant psychological incentive not to pay attention and, over time, to remember the recoil as soft. Blank cartridges, as used in nail guns Yugoslavian 7. ... This article is about firearms projectiles. ... Diffusion of responsibility is a social phenomenon which tends to occur in groups of people above a certain critical size when responsibility is not explicitly assigned. ... An early naval cannon design, allowing the gun to roll backwards a small distance when firing The recoil when firing a gun is the backward momentum of a gun, which is equal to the forward momentum of the bullet or shell, due to conservation of momentum. ...


The firing squad is commonly used to execute spies; the renowned World War I spy Mata Hari was executed in this manner. It is often considered a particularly honorable method of execution,[citation needed] and as such is intentionally not used for war criminals, who are often hanged — a penalty associated with common criminals. In contrast, firing squads were used by some countries to execute war criminals after World War II, most notably by Poland, the Soviet Union, Denmark and Norway. The freedom-fighter Bhagat Singh also requested to be killed by firing squad instead of hanging, (a request was refused) before his execution for shooting a police officer was carried out by British India. Spies may refer to: A person who engages in espionage Spies (Coldplay), a song by the rock group Coldplay. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Mata Hari, exotic dancer and convicted spy, made her name synonymous with femme fatale during World War I. For the Indonesian supermarket/department store chain, see Matahari. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... For other uses, see Crime (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Bhagat Singh (Punjabi,Gurmukhi: ਭਗਤ ਸਿੰਘ) (Urdu-Shahmukhi: ) (September 28,[1] 1907–March 23, 1931) was an Indian freedom fighter, considered to be one of the most famous revolutionaries of the Indian independence movement. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George...


The method is also the supreme punishment or disciplinary means employed by courts martial for crimes such as cowardice, desertion or mutiny. One such execution was that of Private Eddie Slovik by the U.S. Army in 1945. Slovik was the first U.S. soldier executed for desertion since the American Civil War. It has also been applied for violent crimes carried out by soldiers, such as murder or rape. Also notably, Jean-Marie Bastien-Thiry was executed by firing squad for his participation in the assassination attempt on President Charles de Gaulle. A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... Cowardice is a vice that is conventionally viewed as the corruption of prudence, to thwart all courage or bravery. ... For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ... Mutiny is the act of conspiring to disobey an order that a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) are legally obliged to obey. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... General de Gaulle at upper left, Bastien-Thiry at upper right Jean-Marie Bastien-Thiry (October 19, 1927 – March 11, 1963) was a French military air weaponry engineer and the last who attempted to assassinate President of France Charles de Gaulle. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... For other uses, see Charles de Gaulle (disambiguation). ...


Firing squads have also been used for political crimes. Romanian Communist leader Nicolae Ceauşescu (25 December 1989) is an example of this. Also the Italian fascist dictator Benito Mussolini was executed in this manner, on 28 April 1945, by a firing squad of the Italian resistance movement. In the standard sense of the phrase, a political crime is an action deemed illegal by a government in order to control real or imagined threats to its survival, at the expense of a range of human rights and freedoms. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Nicolae CeauÅŸescu (IPA , in English, sometimes (and erroneously) ) (January 26, 1918–December 25, 1989) was the leader of Romania from 1965 until December 1989, when a revolution and coup removed him from power. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Mussolini redirects here. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Partisans parading in Milan The Italian resistance movement was a partisan force during World War II. // After Italys capitulation on 8 September 1943, the Italian resistance movement became massive. ...

World War I firing squad (staged)

Execution by firing squad should be considered distinct from other forms of execution by firearms, such as a single shot from a handgun to the back of the neck. However, the single shot (coup de grâce) is sometimes incorporated in a firing squad execution, particularly if the initial volley turns out not to be immediately fatal. Firing squad in World War I. This image was actually staged by a reporter who appears as the victim. ... Firing squad in World War I. This image was actually staged by a reporter who appears as the victim. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... One of the most famous executions by firearms, the summary execution of Nguyen Van Lem, a Viet Cong officer, by Saigon Chief of Police General Nguyen Ngoc Loan during the Tet Offensive of 1968 became an icon of the Vietnam war Execution by single firearm is different from execution by... Look up coup de grâce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Firing squads in the United States

Main article: Capital punishment in the United States

According to Executions in the U.S. 1608-1987 by M. Watt Espy and John Ortiz Smylka, it is estimated that 142 men have been judicially shot in the United States and English-speaking predecessor territories since 1608, excluding executions related to the American Civil War. The Civil War saw several hundred firing squad deaths, but reliable numbers are not available. Crimes punishable by firing squad in the Civil War included desertion, intentionally killing a superior officer or fellow soldier, and being a spy. Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 37 of the 50 states of the United States, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...

Firing squad history and laws in the U.S.Color key:      Secondary method only      Once used firing squad, but does not today      Has never used firing squad
Firing squad history and laws in the U.S.
Color key:      Secondary method only      Once used firing squad, but does not today      Has never used firing squad

Capital punishment was suspended in the United States between 1967 and 1976 as a result of several decisions of the United States Supreme Court. The process resumed with the execution of Gary Gilmore on January 17, 1977, at Utah State Prison in Draper. The five executioners were equipped with .30-30 caliber rifles and off-the-shelf Winchester 150 grain (9.7 g) SilverTip ammunition. The subject was restrained and hooded. The shots were fired at a distance of 20 feet (6 m), aiming at the chest. In his autobiography Shot in the Heart, Mikal Gilmore wrote that when he examined the shirt worn by his brother Gary during the execution, he found five bullet holes, indicating that all members of the squad had been armed with live cartridges and none with a blank round. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... This article is about the American murderer. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... The Utah State Prison main complex is located in Draper, Utah about 20 miles southwest of Salt Lake City. ... Draper is a city in Salt Lake County and Utah County, Utah, United States, located about 20 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... . ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... Mikal Gilmore is a writer. ... Rimmed, centerfire . ...


The only other post-Furman execution by firing squad, that of John Albert Taylor in 1996, also took place in Utah. Taylor is said to have chosen the firing squad because it would be awkward for state officials. Holding The arbitrary and inconsistent imposition of the death penalty violates the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. ... John Albert Taylor (born c. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


In Utah, the firing squad consisted of five volunteer police officers from the county in which the conviction of the offender took place. A law passed on March 15, 2004 banned execution by firing squad in Utah, but since that specific law was not retroactive, four inmates on Utah's death row could still have their last requests granted. As of 2006, Idaho and Oklahoma are the only other states in which execution by firing squad is legally available (as backup methods only; both states use lethal injection as their primary methods of execution). This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Retroactive is an album by British band Def Leppard released in 1993. ... For information about the Record company see Death Row Records For information about the computer game see Deathrow (game) Death Row is a term that refers to the section of a prison that houses individuals awaiting execution. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ...


Firing squads in Canada

Canada executed several men for military crimes, chiefly cowardice and desertion, in the First World War, and maintained the death sentence in the Canadian Criminal Code until 1976 and militarily until 1998 (although the last execution held in Canada was in 1962). One soldier was executed during the Second World War, Private Harold Joseph Pringle of The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment who was executed in Italy in 1945 for murder. The novel Execution is a fictional treatment of this incident and inspired the television movie Firing Squad. In general, Canadian firing squads and the imposition of capital punishment was patterned after the British military justice system. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Harold Pringle (full name Harold John Pringle) was a Private in the Canadian Army. ... The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment is a reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces. ...


Firing squads in the United Kingdom & Ireland

Main article: Capital punishment in the United Kingdom

Execution by firing squad in the United Kingdom has been limited to times of war, armed insurrection, and within the military. Capital punishment in the United Kingdom refers to the use of capital punishment in the United Kingdom and its constituent countries, predating the formation of the United Kingdom itself. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Insurrection could refer to: * in a general sense, it means Rebellion * it is also a title of a Star Trek film, see Star Trek: Insurrection ...


Within the military, Admiral John Byng was one of the most senior officers and the last of his rank to be executed in this fashion. He was shot on 14 March 1757 at Portsmouth for "failing to do his utmost" in an encounter with the French fleet during the Seven Years' War. Australian soldiers, Harry "Breaker" Morant and Peter Handcock were shot by a British firing squad on February 27, 1902, for alleged war crimes during the Boer War; many questions have since been raised as to whether they received a fair trial. Morant's (now famous) final words were "shoot straight, you bastards". For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Portrait of John Byng by Thomas Hudson, 1749 John Byng (October 29, 1704 – March 14, 1757) was a British Admiral who was court-martialled and executed for failing to do his utmost during the Battle of Minorca, at the beginning of the Seven Years War. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1756–1763 war. ... Harry Breaker Harbord Morant For the film of the same name, see Breaker Morant (film) Harry Breaker Harbord Morant (1864– 27 February 1902) was an Anglo-Australian drover, horseman, poet, and soldier whose renowned skill with horses earned him the nickname The Breaker. Articulate, intelligent, and well-educated, he was... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... In the context of war, a war crime is a punishable offense under International Law, for violations of the laws of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...


Following the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland, 15 of the 16 rebel leaders were shot by the British military authorities under martial law. One leader, James Connolly, who could not stand because a bullet had already shattered his ankle during the fighting was strapped to a chair and shot. The executions have often been cited as a reason why the rebels managed to galvanise public support in Ireland after their failed rebellion. In the ensuing Irish War of Independence (1919-1921), the British authorities were wary of carrying out executions for fear of further inflaming nationalist sentiment. Nevertheless, 14 Irish Republican Army members were shot by firing squad during the conflict. However, the most draconian use of this punishment in the period came after the British had withdrawn from the Irish Free State. In the Irish Civil War of 1922-23, the new Irish government officially executed 77 Anti-Treaty IRA members by firing squad (see Executions during the Irish Civil War). Combatants Irish Volunteers, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Republican Brotherhood British Army Royal Irish Constabulary Commanders Patrick Pearse, James Connolly Brigadier-General Lowe General Sir John Maxwell Strength 1250 in Dublin, c. ... For the Olympic athlete, see James Connolly (athletics). ... Combatants Irish Republic United Kingdom Commanders Michael Collins Richard Mulcahy Cathal Brugha Important local IRA leaders Henry Hugh Tudor Strength Irish Republican Army c. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... This article is about the prior state. ... The Irish Civil War (June 28, 1922 – May 24, 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... The split in Sinn Féin and the Irish Republican Army following the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in 1921 led to the emergence of group of Anti-Treatyites, sometimes referred to as the Irregulars, who continued to use the name Irish Republican Army (IRA) or in Irish Óglaigh... Memorial to the Republican soldiers murdered by Free State forces at Ballyseedy, County Kerry. ...


The Tower of London was used during both World Wars for executions: during World War I, 11 captured German spies were shot, and on 15 August 1941 German Corporal Josef Jakobs was shot for espionage during World War II. For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Josef Jakobs, a German agent, was shot by firing squad in the Tower of London during the Second World War after conviction under the Treachery Act of 1940. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Private Thomas Highgate was the first British soldier to be convicted of desertion and then executed by firing squad during the First World War. Particularly since the 1960s there has been some controversy concerning 346 British and Imperial troops — including 25 Canadian, 22 Irish and 5 New Zealand troops — who were shot for desertion, murder, cowardice and other offences during the War, some of whom are now thought to have been suffering from combat stress reaction or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (or "shell-shock" as it was then known). The New Zealand government pardoned their troops in 2000; the British government in 1998 expressed sympathy for the executed; in 2006 the Secretary of State for Defence announced a full pardon for all 306 executed soldiers of the First War.[1] Private Thomas James Highgate (13 May 1895 - 8 September 1914) was an English soldier during the early days of the First World War. ... For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Image from The Great War taken in an Australian Dressing Station near Ypres in 1917. ... Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), is a term for the psychological consequences of exposure to or confrontation with stressful experiences, which involve actual or threatened death, serious physical injury or a threat to physical integrity and which the person found highly traumatic. ... For the Breton religious festivals, see Pardon (ceremony). ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ...


Capital punishment in the UK, including the military, was formally outlawed by the Human Rights Act 1998 (s. 21(5)), although capital punishment for murder had been abolished before this, and there had been no judicial executions by any method since 1964. Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... The Human Rights Act 1998 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom which received Royal Assent on November 9, 1998, and mostly came into force on October 2, 2000. ...


Firing squads in Finland

This article is part of the
Capital punishment series
Issues

Capital punishment debate
Religion and capital punishment
Wrongful execution Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is often the subject of controversy. ... Most major world religions take an ambiguous position on the morality of capital punishment. ... Capital punishment Wrongful execution is a miscarriage of justice occurring when an innocent person is put to death by capital punishment, the death penalty. The possibility of wrongful executions is one of the arguments presented by the opponents of capital punishment; other arguments include failing to deter crime more than...

By region

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More... The only countries in Europe that havent abolished the death penalty yet is Albania, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Latvia and Russia. ...

Methods

Decapitation
Electrocution
Firing squad
Gas chamber
Hanging
Lethal injection
More... Electric chair as used for electrocutions. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... The electric chair is an execution method in which the person being put to death is strapped to a chair and electrocuted through electrodes placed on the body. ... For other uses, see Gas chamber (disambiguation). ... Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... Electric chair as used for electrocutions. ...

The death penalty was widely used during and after the Finnish Civil War; some 9,700 Finns were executed during the war or its aftermath.[2] Most executions were carried out by firing squads after the sentences were given by illegal or semi-legal courts martial. Only some 250 persons were sentenced to death in courts acting on legal authority.[3] Combatants Whites: White Guards, German Empire, Swedish volunteers Reds: Red Guards, Russian SFSR Commanders C.G.E. Mannerheim Ali Aaltonen, Eero Haapalainen, Eino Rahja, Kullervo Manner Strength 80,000–90,000 Finns, 550 Swedish volunteers, 13,000 Germans[1] 80,000–90,000 Finns, 4,000–10,000 Russians[1...


During World War II some 500 persons were executed, half of them condemned spies. The usual causes for death penalty for Finnish citizens were treason and high treason (and to a lesser extent cowardice and disobedience, applicable for military personnel). Almost all cases of capital punishment were carried out by court martial. Usually the executions were carried out by the regimental military police platoon, or in the case of spies, by the local military police. Most executions occurred in 1941 and during the Soviet Summer Offensive in 1944. The last death sentences were given in 1945 for murder but later commuted to life imprisonment.[4] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Citizenship in Finland can be obtained on the basis of birth, marriage of parents, adoption, or the place of birth. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ... {{main|Treason}} High treason, broadly defined, is an action which is grossly disloyal to ones country or sovereign. ... Cowardice is a vice that is conventionally viewed as the corruption of prudence, to thwart all courage or bravery. ... Disobedience was a network set up to protest the upcoming War on Iraq during 2002 and early 2003. ...


The death penalty was abolished in by Finnish law in 1949 for crimes committed during peace time, and in 1972 for all crimes.[5] Finland is party to the Optional protocol of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, forbidding the use of the death penalty in all circumstances.[6] Parties to the ICCPR: members in green, non-members in grey The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights is a United Nations treaty based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, created in 1966 and entered into force on 23 March 1976. ...


Firing squads in Norway

Vidkun Quisling and 36 others convicted of treason and/or war crimes in Norway during the legal purge in Norway after World War II were executed by firing squad at specially designated places, under the command of the local police chief. Quisling was executed at Akershus festning on October 24, 1945. Vidkun Abraham Lauritz Jonssøn Quisling, (July 18, 1887 – October 24, 1945) was a Norwegian army officer and fascist politician. ... Following the general capitulation of Germany in Europe and in Norway on May 10, 1945, the legitimate Norwegian government moved quickly to prosecute individuals who were suspected of treason or war crimes during the German occupation. ... Akershus Castle Akershus Fortress (Norwegian: Akershus Festning) is the old castle built to protect Oslo, the capital of Norway. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Firing squads in The Netherlands

Anton Mussert, a Dutch Nazi leader was sentenced to death by firing squad, and he was executed in the dunes near The Hague on 7 May 1946. Anton Adriaan Mussert (May 11, 1894 in Werkendam – May 7, 1946 in The Hague) was one of the founders of the National Socialist Movement (NSB) in the Netherlands and its de jure leader. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Hague redirects here. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Today

Apart from the two states in the United States, execution by firing squad is still actively carried out in other countries where the death penalty is used. In the United Arab Emirates it is the preferred method of execution.[7] In other countries like China, execution by shooting is the most common form of execution. In modern society, death by firing squad is a common punishment for homosexuals. Most people think that this is a suitable punishment for people who violate the laws of Nature. Execution by shooting is a form of capital punishment whereby an executed person is shot by a firearm or firearms. ...


Fiction

In Michael Morpurgo's novel Private Peaceful the elder brother of Thomas Peaceful, the main character, Charlie Peaceful, was executed by a firing squad for cowardice in World War I Michael Andrew Bridge Morpurgo OBE (born 5 October 1943) is a British writer. ... Private Peaceful is a novel written by Michael Morpurgo. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


See also

Capital punishment in the United Kingdom refers to the use of capital punishment in the United Kingdom and its constituent countries, predating the formation of the United Kingdom itself. ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 37 of the 50 states of the United States, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system: England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland another. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... The Shot at Dawn Memorial is a British Monument located at the National Memorial Arboretum near Alrewas, in Staffordshire, England in memory of the 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers executed for cowardice and desertion during World War I. The memorial portrays a young British soldier blindfolded and tied to a... At one time the death penalty was used in almost every part of the globe; but over the last few decades many countries have abolished it. ... Execution by shooting is a form of capital punishment whereby an executed person is shot by a firearm or firearms. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ The Daily Telegraph, Ben Fenton, 16 August 2006, accessed 14 October 2006
  2. ^ War Victims of Finland 1914-1922 at the Finnish National Archives
  3. ^ Yliopistolehti 1995
  4. ^ Yliopistolehti 1995
  5. ^ Kuolemantuomio kuolemantuomiolle at Statistics Finland (in Finnish)
  6. ^ Finnish public treaty number SopS 49/1991
  7. ^ United Arab Emirates (UAE): Death penalty, Amnesty International (Urgent Action), April 3, 2002.

  Results from FactBites:
 
iCorrection.com -- Firing squad (802 words)
Execution by firing squad is distinct from other forms of execution by firearms, such as a single shot from a handgun to the back of the neck.
It was relaunched by the execution of Gary Gilmore on January 24, 1977 at Utah State Prison in Draper, Utah by a five-man firing squad.
The firing squad was banned in Utah by a law passed on March 15, 2004, leaving Idaho and Oklahoma as the only states where it is still legal, although four Utah convicts that previously chose to die by firing squad will have their requests honored should they ultimately be executed.
Execution by firing squad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1487 words)
The firing squad is generally composed of several soldiers or peace officers.
Execution by firing squad should be considered distinct from other forms of execution by firearms, such as a single shot from a handgun to the back of the neck.
In Utah, the firing squad (a 5 man team) consisted of volunteer peace officers from the county in which the conviction of the offender took place.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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