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Encyclopedia > Evelyn Waugh
Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten

Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (October 28, 1903April 10, 1966) was an English writer, best known for such satirical and darkly humorous novels as Decline and Fall, Vile Bodies, Scoop, A Handful of Dust, and The Loved One, as well as for more serious works, such as Brideshead Revisited and the Sword of Honour trilogy, that are influenced by his own conservative and Catholic outlook. Many of Waugh's novels depict the British aristocracy and high society, which he savagely satirizes but to which he was also strongly attracted. In addition, he wrote short stories, three biographies, and the first volume of an unfinished autobiography. His travel writings and his extensive diaries and correspondence have also been published. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1097x1490, 1079 KB) Public domain image from Library of Congress [1] taken in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten de: Lizenzhinweis: Die Nutzung der Bilder wurde auf der Projektseite Fragen zum Urheberrecht dahingehend geklärt, dass die Verwendung der {PD-Van Vechten... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1097x1490, 1079 KB) Public domain image from Library of Congress [1] taken in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten de: Lizenzhinweis: Die Nutzung der Bilder wurde auf der Projektseite Fragen zum Urheberrecht dahingehend geklärt, dass die Verwendung der {PD-Van Vechten... Photographic self-portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Decline and Fall is a novel by the English author Evelyn Waugh. ... Vile Bodies is a novel by Evelyn Waugh. ... Scoop is a 1938 novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh about the rush of war reporters to a thinly disguised Abyssinia (now Ethiopia). ... A Handful of Dust is a novel by Evelyn Waugh published in 1934. ... The Loved One was also a short movie directed by wrestler Mick Foley chronicling the rise to success of his character Dude Love. ... Brideshead Revisited, the Sacred and Profane Memories of Capt. ... The Sword of Honour trilogy by Evelyn Waugh is his look at the Second World War. ... Conservatism is a political philosophy that usually favors traditional values and strong foreign defense. ... The Ancient Greek term aristocracy originally meant a system of government with rule by the best. The word is derived from two words, aristos meaning the best and kratein to rule. Aristocracies have most often been hereditary plutocracies (see below), where a sense of historical gravitas and noblesse oblige demands... Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ... Travel literature is literature which records the people, events, sights and feelings of an author who is touring a foreign place for the pleasure of travel. ... For appointment diaries, see Personal organizer. ...


American literary critic Edmund Wilson pronounced Waugh "the only first-rate comic genius that has appeared in English since Bernard Shaw,"[1] while Time magazine declared that he had "developed a wickedly hilarious yet fundamentally religious assault on a century that, in his opinion, had ripped up the nourishing taproot of tradition and let wither all the dear things of the world."[2] Waugh's works were very successful with the reading public and he was widely admired by critics as a humorist and prose stylist, but his later, more overtly religious works have attracted controversy. In his notes for an unpublished review of Brideshead Revisited, George Orwell declared that Waugh was "about as good a novelist as one can be while holding untenable opinions."[3] The American conservative commentator William F. Buckley, Jr. found in Waugh "the greatest English novelist of the century,"[4] while his liberal counterpart Gore Vidal called him "our time's first satirist."[5] Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... George Bernard Shaw (George) Bernard Shaw[1] (born Dublin, 26 July 1856 – died 2 November 1950 in Hertfordshire) was an Irish playwright based in England. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was a British author and journalist. ... William F. Buckley, Jr. ... Gore Vidal in 1948, photographed by Carl Van Vechten Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) is a prolific, versatile American writer of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and, of late, a liberal political pundit. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in London, England, Evelyn Waugh was the son of noted editor and publisher Arthur Waugh. He was brought up in upper middle class circumstances in Hampstead. His only sibling was his older brother Alec Waugh, who also became a writer. Both Arthur and Alec had been educated at Sherborne, an English public school, but Alec had been expelled during his final year and had then published a very controversial novel, The Loom of Youth, based on his school life. Sherborne therefore refused to take Evelyn and his father sent him to Lancing College, a school of lesser social prestige with a strong High Church Anglican character. This circumstance would rankle with the status-conscious Evelyn for the rest of his life but may have contributed to his interest in religion, even though at Lancing he lost his childhood faith and became an agnostic. He tells of an incident in which he evened the score with a crowd of bullies by manipulating the school infirmary into pumping the bullies' stomachs; Waugh stood outside the infirmary as the wretched schoolboys emerged, and waved grandly at them with a knowing smile. The bullying stopped. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Arthur Waugh was an English author, literary critic and publisher, and the father of Alec and Evelyn Waugh. ... Hampstead is an area in the London Borough of Camden. ... Alexander Raban Waugh (Alec Waugh) (July 8, 1898 – September 3, 1981), was a British novelist, the elder brother of the better-known Evelyn Waugh. ... The school buildings Sherborne School is an English public school for boys in the affluent town of Sherborne in north-west Dorset, England. ... The term public school has different (and in some cases contradictory) meanings due to regional differences. ... The Loom of Youth is a novel written by Alec Waugh, older brother of Evelyn Waugh, based on his life at Sherborne School, a public school in Dorset. ... Lancing College is a prestigious and internationally renowned co-educational English Public School (fee-paying independent school), founded in 1848 by Rev. ... High Church is a term that may now be used in speaking of viewpoints within a number of denominations of Protestant Christianity in general, but it is one which has traditionally been employed in Churches associated with the Anglican tradition in particular. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Agnosticism (from the Greek a, meaning without and gnosis, knowledge, translating to unknowable) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims—particularly theological claims regarding metaphysics, afterlife or the existence of God, god(s), or deities—is unknown or (possibly) inherently unknowable. ...


After Lancing, he attended Hertford College, Oxford as a history scholar. There, Waugh neglected academic work and was known as much for his artwork as for his writing. He also threw himself into a vigorous social scene populated by both aesthetes such as Harold Acton, Brian Howard and David Talbot Rice, as well as members of the British aristocracy and the upper classes. His social life at Oxford influenced Waugh's personal transformation into something of a snob and provided the background for some of his most characteristic later writing. Waugh had at least two homosexual romances at Oxford (whether they had a physical dimension is unclear) before he began to date women in the late 1920s. Asked if he had competed in any sport for his College, Waugh famously replied "I drank for Hertford." College name Hertford College Named after Elias de Hertford Established 1282 Sister College None Principal Dr John Landers JCR President Stephanie Johnston Undergraduates 376 Graduates 224 Homepage Boatclub Hertford College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... In England in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an aesthete was a person who was usually well educated, had exaggerated tastes and cultivated a style of dress and manner calculated to annoy the mainstream of intellectual society. ... Harold Acton (July 5, 1904 - February 27, 1994) was an Anglo-Italian writer and dilettante who is probably most famous for inspiring the character of Anthony Blanche in Evelyn Waughs novel Brideshead Revisited (1945). ... Brian Christian de Claiborne Howard (13 March 1905 - 15 January 1958) was an English poet, whose work belied a spectacularly precocious start in life; in the end he became more of a journalist, writing for the New Statesman. ... Professor David Talbot Rice was born 11 July 1903 and brought up in Gloucestershire (England). ... A snob, guilty of snobbery, is a person that adopts the world-view that other people are inherently inferior for any one of a variety of reasons including supposed intellect, wealth, education, ancestry, etc. ...

Evelyn Waugh as a student, from a portrait by the British painter Henry Lamb (1883-1960), a member of Walter Sickert's Camden Town Group, and later the Bloomsbury Group.
Evelyn Waugh as a student, from a portrait by the British painter Henry Lamb (1883-1960), a member of Walter Sickert's Camden Town Group, and later the Bloomsbury Group.

Waugh's final exam results qualified him only for a third-class degree. He refused to remain in residence for the extra term that would have been required of him and he left Oxford in 1924 without taking his degree. In 1925 he taught at a private school in Wales. In his autobiography, Waugh claims that he attempted suicide at the time by swimming out to sea, only to turn back after being stung by jellyfish. He was later dismissed from another teaching post for attempting to seduce the matron, telling his father he had been dismissed for "inebriation". Image File history File links Evelyn-waughportrait. ... Image File history File links Evelyn-waughportrait. ... This article is about the country. ... Orders Stauromedusae Coronatae Semaeostomeae Rhizostomae Jellyfish are marine invertebrates belonging to the Scyphozoan class, and in turn the phylum Cnidaria. ...


He was briefly apprenticed to a cabinet-maker and afterwards maintained an interest in marquetry, to which his novels have been compared in their intricate inlayed subplots. He also worked as a journalist, before he had his first great literary success in 1928 with his first completed novel, Decline and Fall. The title is from Gibbon, but whereas Gibbon charted the bankruptcy and dissolution of Rome, Waugh's was a witty account of quite a different sort of dissolution, following the career of the harmless Paul Pennyfeather, a student of divinity, as he is accidentally expelled from Oxford for indecency ("I expect you'll be becoming a schoolmaster, sir," says the College porter to Paul, "That's what most of the gentlemen does, sir, that gets sent down for indecent behaviour") and enters into the worlds of schoolmastering, high society, and the white slave trade. Other novels about England's "Bright Young Things" followed, and all were well received by both critics and the general public. // What is it? Marquetry is essentially the craft of entirely covering a structural carcass with veneer forming decorative patterns, designs or pictures. ... Decline and Fall is a novel by the English author Evelyn Waugh. ... Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Divinity is the academic study of Christian and other theology and religious ministry at a school, divinity school, university, or seminary. ... A sex worker in Germany. ... Bright Young Things is a 2003 movie directed by Stephen Fry; the film represents the directorial debut for the British actor and presenter. ...


Waugh entered into a brief, unsuccessful marriage in 1928 to the Hon. Evelyn Gardner. (Their friends called them He-Evelyn and She-Evelyn.) Gardner's infidelity would provide the background for Waugh's novel A Handful of Dust. The marriage ended in divorce in 1930. Waugh converted to Catholicism and, after his marriage to Evelyn Gardner was declared null by the Church, he married Laura Herbert, a Catholic, daughter of Aubrey Herbert, and granddaughter of Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon. This marriage was successful, lasting the rest of his life, producing seven children. His son Auberon Waugh achieved recognition as a writer and journalist. A Handful of Dust is a novel by Evelyn Waugh published in 1934. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Rt Hon. ... Auberon Alexander Waugh (November 17, 1939 – January 16, 2001) was a British author and journalist. ...


The 1930s

Waugh's fame continued to grow between the wars, based on his satires of contemporary upper class English society, written in prose that was seductively simple and elegant. His style was often inventive (a chapter, for example, would be written entirely in the form of a dialogue of telephone calls). His conversion to Roman Catholicism in 1930 was a watershed in his life and his writing. It elevated Catholic themes in his work, and aspects of his deep and sincere faith, both implicit and explicit, can be found in all of his later work. At the same time, Black Mischief and A Handful of Dust contain episodes of the most savage farce. In some of his fiction Waugh derives comedy from the cruelty of mischance; ingenuous characters are subject to bizarre calamities in a universe that seems to lack a shaping and protecting God, or any other source of order and comfort. Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which principally ridicules its subject (individuals, organizations, states) often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


The period between the wars also saw extensive travels around the Mediterranean and Red Sea, Spitsbergen, Africa and South America. Sections of the numerous travel books which resulted are often cited as among the best writing in this genre. A compendium of Waugh's favourite travel writing has been issued under the title When The Going Was Good.


Second World War

With the advent of the Second World War, Waugh used "friends in high places", such as Randolph Churchill — son of Winston — to find him a service commission. Though 36 years old with poor eyesight, he was commissioned in the Royal Marines in 1940. Few can have been less suited to command troops. He lacked a common touch. Though personally brave, he did not suffer fools gladly. There was some concern that the men under his command might shoot him instead of the enemy. Promoted to captain, Waugh found life in the Marines dull. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Randolph Frederick Edward Spencer Churchill (May 28, 1911-June 6, 1968) was the son of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and his wife Clementine. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was an English statesman, soldier, and author, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys light infantry. ...


Waugh participated in the failed attempt to take Dakar from the Vichy French in late 1940. Following a joint exercise with No.3 Commando (Army), he applied to join them and was accepted. Waugh took part in an ill-fated commando raid on the coast of Libya. As special assistant to the famed commando leader Robert Laycock, Waugh showed conspicuous bravery during the fighting in Crete in 1941, supervising the evacuation of troops while under attack by Stuka dive bombers. (City of Dakar, divided into 19 communes darrondissement) City proper (commune) Région Dakar Département Dakar Mayor Pape Diop (PDS) (since 2002) Area 82. ... Vichy France (French: now called Régime de Vichy or Vichy; called itself at the time État Français, or French State) was the French state of 1940-1944 which was a puppet government under Nazi influence, as opposed to the Free French Forces, based first in London and later... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but unregimented raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... Layforce consisted of Nos. ... Combatants Greece United Kingdom New Zealand Australia Germany Italy Commanders Bernard Freyberg Kurt Student Strength United Kingdom: 15,000 Greece: 11,000 Australia: 7,100 New Zealand: 6,700 Total: 40,000 (10,000 without fighting capability. ... Junkers Ju 87 Dive-Bombers The Junkers Ju 87 or Stuka was the most famous Sturzkampfflugzeug (German dive bomber) in World War II, instantly recognisable by its inverted gull-wings and fixed undercarriage. ...


Later, Waugh was placed on extended leave for several years and reassigned to the Royal Horse Guards. During this period he wrote Brideshead Revisited. He was recalled for a military/diplomatic mission to Yugoslavia in 1944 at the request of his old friend Randolph Churchill. He and Churchill narrowly escaped capture or death when the Germans undertook Operation Rösselsprung, and paratroops and glider-borne storm troops attacked the partisans' headquarters where they were staying. An outcome was a formidable report detailing Tito's persecution of the clergy. It was "buried" by Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden as being largely irrelevant. The Royal Horse Guards (RHG) was a Household Cavalry regiment of the British Army. ... Brideshead Revisited, the Sacred and Profane Memories of Capt. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Operation Rösselsprung (Knights Leap) was a World War II operation by the Germans in April and May 1944, whose goal was to capture Josip Broz Tito and disrupt the leadership of the communist Partisan movement in Yugoslavia. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Yugoslav Partisans were the main resistance movement engaged in the fight against the Axis forces in the Balkans during World War II, the Yugoslav Peoples Liberation War. ... Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ... Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (June 12, 1897– January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1955 to 1957. ...


Some of Waugh's best-loved and best-known novels come from this period. Brideshead Revisited (1945), is an evocation of a vanished pre-war England. It is an extraordinary work which in many ways has come to define Waugh and his view of his world. It not only painted a rich picture of life in England and at Oxford University at a time (before World War II), which Waugh himself loved and embellished in the novel, but it allowed him to share his feelings about his Catholic faith, principally through the actions of his characters. Amazingly, he was granted leave from the war to write it. The book was applauded by his friends, not just for an evocation of a time now — and then — long gone, but also for its examination of the manifold pressures within a traditional Catholic family. It was a huge success in Britain and in the United States. Decades later a television adaptation achieved popularity and acclaim in both countries, and around the world; a film adaptation is planned for 2008. Waugh revised the novel in the late 1950s because he found parts of it "distasteful on a full stomach" by which he meant that he wrote the novel during the grey privations of the latter war years.


Much of Waugh's war experience is reflected in the Sword of Honour trilogy. It consists of three novels, Men at Arms (1952), Officers and Gentlemen (1955) and Unconditional Surrender (1961), which loosely parallel his wartime experiences. His trilogy, along with his other work after the 1930s, became some of the best books written about the Second World War. Many of his portraits are unforgettable, and often show striking resemblances to noted real personalities. Waugh biographer Christopher Sykes, felt that the fire-eating officer in the Sword of Honour trilogy, Brigadier Ben Ritchie-Hook, "...bears a very strong resemblance to..." Lieutenant-General Sir Adrian Carton De Wiart VC, a friend of the author's father-in-law. Waugh was familiar with Carton De Wiart through the club to which he belonged. The fictional commando leader, Tommy Blackhouse, is based on Major-General Sir Robert Laycock, a real-life commando leader and friend of Waugh's. A trilogy is a set of three works of art, usually literature or film, that are connected and can generally be seen as a single work as well as three individual ones. ... Christopher Hugh Sykes was born on 17 November 1907 and died on 8 December 1986. ... Lieutenant General Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart VC, KBE, CB, CMG, DSO, (May 5, 1880 - June 5, 1963), was a British officer of Belgian and Irish descent. ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ... Layforce consisted of Nos. ...


Later years

The period after the war saw Waugh living with his family in the West Country at his country homes, Piers Court, and from 1956 onwards, at Combe Florey, Somerset, where he lived as a country gentleman and continued to write. He would eventually bequeath Combe Florey to his son Auberon. Waugh was highly critical of Vatican II's 1960s changes to his beloved Roman Catholic liturgy, for a church which he in part loved for what he saw as its timelessness.[citation needed] The West Country is an informal term for the area of south-western England encompasing the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Somerset, and Dorset, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire. ... Combe Florey is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated six miles north west of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Auberon Alexander Waugh (November 17, 1939 – January 16, 2001) was a British author and journalist. ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ...


The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold (1957) depicts its hero's steady descent into madness — the experience was actually Waugh's own, the result of taking sleeping medication which induced a severe bout of paranoia that reached its peak on a sea-voyage to Ceylon (Sri Lanka).[citation needed] This period also produced Helena, (1953), a fictional account of the Empress Helena and the finding of the True Cross, which Waugh regarded as his best work. [citation needed]


Waugh put on a lot of weight late in life, and the sleeping draughts he continued to take, combined with a heavy intake of alcohol, cigars and little exercise, weakened his health. His writing productivity gradually ran down, and there was a very noticeable falling off in the quality of what fiction he did write (his last published work, Basil Seal Rides Again, taking up some of the characters from his very earliest satirical works, did not meet critical or popular approval). At the same time, he continued to produce valuable journalism.


He died, aged 62, on 10 April 1966, on returning home from Mass on Easter Sunday. His estate at probate was valued at £20,068. This did not include the value of his lucrative copyrights, which Waugh put in a trust for his children. He is buried at Combe Florey, Somerset.[citation needed] April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


List of works

Novels

Decline and Fall is a novel by the English author Evelyn Waugh. ... Vile Bodies is a novel by Evelyn Waugh. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, author, actor and filmmaker. ... Bright Young Things is a 2003 movie directed by Stephen Fry; the film represents the directorial debut for the British actor and presenter. ... Black Mischief was Evelyn Waughs third novel. ... Haile Selassie Haile Selassie (Power of Trinity) (July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975) was the last Emperor (1930–1936; 1941–1974) of Ethiopia, and is a religious symbol in the Rastafarian movement. ... This article needs cleanup. ... A Handful of Dust is a novel by Evelyn Waugh published in 1934. ... British Guiana was the name of the British colony on the northern coast of South America, now the independent nation of Guyana. ... Scoop is a 1938 novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh about the rush of war reporters to a thinly disguised Abyssinia (now Ethiopia). ... This article needs cleanup. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... British Ministry of Home Security Poster of a type that was common during the Phony War The Phony War , or in Winston Churchills words the Twilight War, was a phase in early World War II marked by few military operations in Continental Europe, in the months following the German... Brideshead Revisited, the Sacred and Profane Memories of Capt. ... It has been suggested that Channel 3 (UK) be merged into this article or section. ... The Loved One was also a short movie directed by wrestler Mick Foley chronicling the rise to success of his character Dude Love. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Helena is a 1950 novel by Evelyn Waugh depicting the quest of St. ... Helena on a coin. ... The expression The Holy Land (Hebrew ארץ הקודש: Standard Hebrew Éreẓ haQodeÅ¡, Tiberian Hebrew ʾÉreá¹£ haqQāḏēš; Latin Terra Sancta; Arabic الأرض المقدسة, al-Arḍ ul-Muqaddasah) generally refers to the Land of Israel. ... According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. ... The Sword of Honour trilogy by Evelyn Waugh is his look at the Second World War. ... The Sword of Honour trilogy by Evelyn Waugh is his look at the Second World War. ... The Sword of Honour trilogy by Evelyn Waugh is his look at the Second World War. ... The Sword of Honour trilogy by Evelyn Waugh is his look at the Second World War. ... The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold is a novel first published in 1957 by English writer Evelyn Waugh. ...

Biography

Portrait of Edmund Campion St. ... Ronald Arbuthnott Knox (1888-1957) was an English theologian and crime writer. ... Dante Gabriel Rossetti (May 12, 1828 - April 10, 1882) was an English poet, painter and translator. ...

Autobiography

  • A Little Learning (1964)

Biographies about Evelyn Waugh

  • Evelyn Waugh: Portrait of a Country Neighbour by Frances Donaldson, 1967.
  • Evelyn Waugh by Christopher Sykes, 1975.
  • Evelyn Waugh: The Early Years 1903 – 1939 by Martin Stannard, 1987.
  • Evelyn Waugh: The Later Years 1939 – 1966 by Martin Stannard, 1994.
  • Evelyn Waugh: a Biography by Selina Hastings, 1994.
  • The Life of Evelyn Waugh: A Critical Biography by Douglas Lane Patey, 1998.
  • Fathers and Sons: The Autobiography of a Family by Alexander Waugh, 2004.

Frances Annesley (née Lonsdale), Lady Donaldson of Kingsbridge was a writer and biographer. ... Christopher Hugh Sykes was born on 17 November 1907 and died on 8 December 1986. ... Selina, Countess of Huntingdon For other people with the same given name, see Selina. ... This article is an autobiography, and may not conform to Wikipedias NPOV policy. ...

Cultural references

  • 'Evelyn Waugh' is used as a pseudonym for an American actress staying at a hotel in Tokyo in the film Lost in Translation, 2003 (Kelly (Anna Faris): "I'm under Evelyn Waugh." Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson): "Evelyn Waugh was a man.", in an attempt to point out how stupid Kelly is).

Lost in Translation is a film released in the United States on October 3, 2003. ... Anna Kay Faris (born November 29, 1976 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA) is an American actress, best known for her roles in the Scary Movie films as Cindy Campbell. ... Scarlett Johansson (born November 22, 1984) is an American actress. ...

References

  1. ^ " 'Never Apologize, Never Explain', The Art of Evelyn Waugh," The New Yorker, 4 March 1944, reprinted in Classics and Commercials, A Literary Chronicle of the Forties, by Edmund Wilson, page 140, Vintage Books, New York, 1962
  2. ^ Evelyn Waugh (1903–1966): The Beauty of his Malice, obituary in Time, Apr. 22, 1966
  3. ^ Quoted in Christopher Hitchens, "The Permanent Adolescent," The Atlantic Monthly, May 2003
  4. ^ "Evelyn Waugh, R.I.P.", National Review, May 3, 1966 [1]
  5. ^ "Evelyn Waugh," New York Times Book Review, 7 January 1962, reprinted in Rocking the Boat, by Gore Vidal, pages 235-243, Little Brown, Boston, 1962

Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... Christopher Hitchens Christopher Eric Hitchens (born in Portsmouth, England, April 13, 1949) is an author, journalist and literary critic. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ... Little, Brown and Company is a publishing house established by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Evelyn Waugh
  • An Evelyn Waugh Web Site by David Cliffe
  • Doubting Hall — A guided tour around the works of Evelyn Waugh
  • Sponge Cakes with Gooseberry Fool: Evelyn Waugh was Odd
  • Bibliography
  • BBC TV 2006 Documentary and clips
  • The life and death of Evelyn Waugh @ Ward's Book of Days
  • Evelyn Waugh at the Internet Movie Database

  Results from FactBites:
 
Evelyn Waugh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2140 words)
Born in London, Evelyn Waugh was the son of a noted editor and publisher Arthur Waugh.
Waugh converted to Catholicism and, after his marriage to Gardner was annulled by the Church, he married the Catholic Laura Herbert, daughter of Aubrey Herbert.
Waugh's fame continued to grow between the wars, based on his satires of contemporary upper middle class English society, written in a prose which was both approachable and innovative.
NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Evelyn Waugh (5075 words)
Waugh had at least two gay affairs during this time (this in addition to amours with other boys at Lancing), although whether they had a physical dimension is not clear, and he began to date women in the late 1920s.
For the young Evelyn Waugh it must have come both as a recognition and a revelation: the tone of voice in Decline and Fall is so assured because it had already been aired and developed by Gerhardie.
Waugh saw himself as a craftsman whose medium was the English language: someone responsible for shaping a coherent sentence, choosing the exact words to convey the exact meaning the author implied.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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