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Encyclopedia > Eurylochus

In Greek mythology, Eurylochus, or EurĂ˝lokhos appears in Homer's Odyssey as second-in-command of Odysseus' ship during the return to Ithaca after the Trojan War. He was also a relative of Odysseus through marriage. Greek mythology consists of a large collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For the fictional character in The Simpsons, see Homer Simpson. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: Οδύσσεια, Odússeia) is the second of the two great Greek epic poems ascribed to Homer, the first of which is the Iliad. ... This article is about the mythological character. ... For other places named Ithaca, see Ithaca (disambiguation). ... The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor by the armies of the Achaeans, following the kidnapping (or elopement) of Helen of Sparta by Paris of Troy. ...


When the ship stopped on Aeaea, home of Circe the witch, Eurylochus was chosen by lot to lead a group of men to explore the island. After the crew spotted a column of smoke, Eurylochus led his group towards the smoke. They soon neared a palace surrounded with wild but benign animals. Inside the palace was Circe singing, and all of Eurylochus' party except for himself rushed inside to greet her. Eurylochus suspected her treachery from the beginning, and when she turned the rest of the men into pigs, Eurylochus escaped and warned Odysseus and the rest of the crew that had stayed on the ship, thus enabling Odysseus to save his crew. In Greek mythology, Aiaia, or Aeaea, was the home of the god Hermes. ... Circe, a painting by Edward Burne-Jones In Greek mythology, Circe or Kirkê (Greek Κίρκη) was a goddess (or sometimes sorceress) living on the island of Aeaea. ...


However, Eurylochus often disagreed with Odysseus. Although Circe, after making a truce with Odysseus, later instructed Odysseus not to touch the cattle on the island of the sun god Helios, Eurylochus convinced the hungry and mutinous crew to kill some of them. As a punishment Odysseus' ship was destroyed and all of his crew, including Eurylochus, were killed in a storm sent by Zeus. Only Odysseus survived. Helios in Greek In earlier Greek mythology, the sun was personified as a deity called Hêlios (Greek for the sun), whom Homer equates with the sun titan Hyperion. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ...


Eurylochus also convinced the crew to open the bag of wind, given to them by the god of the winds Aeolia. Aeolis (Aiolis) or Aeolia (Aiolia) was an area in west and northwest Asia Minor, mostly along the coast and offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city_states were located. ...


Eurylochus was also a Spartan general during the Peloponnesian War. He fought and was killed at the Battle of Olpae. Sparta (Σπάρτη) was a city in ancient Greece, whose territory included, in Classical times, all Laconia and Messenia, and which was the most powerful state of the Peloponnesus. ... Map of the Greek world at the start of the Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War began in 431 BC between the Athenian Empire (or The Delian League) and the Peloponnesian League which included Sparta and Corinth. ... Battle of Olpae Conflict Peloponnesian War Date 426 BC Place Olpae Result Athenian victory The Battle of Olpae was a battle of the Peloponnesian War in 426 BC, between armies led by Athens and Sparta. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Eurylochus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (290 words)
Inside the palace was Circe singing, and all of Eurylochus' party except for himself rushed inside to greet her.
Eurylochus suspected her treachery from the beginning, and when she turned the rest of the men into pigs, Eurylochus escaped and warned Odysseus and the rest of the crew that had stayed on the ship, thus enabling Odysseus to save his crew.
Eurylochus also convinced the crew to open the bag of wind, given to them by the god of the winds Aeolia.
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