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Encyclopedia > European windstorm
A case of extremely rapid cyclogenesis

A European windstorm is a severe cyclonic storm that tracks across the North Atlantic towards northwestern Europe in the winter months. These storms usually track over the north coast of Scotland towards Norway but can veer south to affect other countries including England, Wales, Ireland, Switzerland, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Lithuania, Latvia, and Poland. As these storms can generate hurricane-force winds (and sometimes even winds at the strength of major hurricanes), they are sometimes referred to as hurricanes, even though very few originate as tropical cyclones. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x600, 539 KB) Image use policy [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x600, 539 KB) Image use policy [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the meteorological phenomenon. ... For other uses, see Atlantic (disambiguation) The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ...


These storms cause economic damage of €1.9 billion per year, and insurance losses of €1.4 billion per year (1990-1998). They rank as the second highest cause of global natural catastrophe insurance loss (after U.S. hurricanes).[citation needed]


Several European languages use the word Orcan (or cognates thereof) to indicate the European windstorm. "Orcan" derives from the Mayan god Huracan, also the source of the word hurricane. This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... In Maya mythology, Huracan (one legged) was a wind, storm and fire god and one of the creator deities who participated in all three attempts at creating humanity. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ...

Contents

Historic and infamous storms

  • January 16, 1362, Grote Mandrenke. A southwesterly Atlantic gale swept across England, the Netherlands, northern Germany and southern Denmark, killing over 25,000 and changing the Dutch-German-Danish coastline.
  • January 6-January 7, 1839. Night of the Big Wind. The most severe windstorm to hit Ireland in recent centuries, with hurricane force winds, killed between 250 and 300 people and rendered hundreds of thousands of homes uninhabitable.
  • December 28, 1879. The Tay Bridge Disaster. Severe gales (estimated to be Force 10-11) swept the east coast of Scotland, infamously resulting in the collapse of the Tay Rail Bridge and the loss of 75 people who were on board the ill-fated train.[1]

is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, English replaces French as Englands national language, for the... The Grote Mandrenke (Dutch: Great Drowning of Men) was the name of a massive southwesterly Atlantic gale, (see also European windstorm), which swept across England, the Netherlands, northern Germany and Schleswig around January 16, 1362, causing at minimum 25,000 deaths. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... The Great Storm of 1703 is the most severe storm ever recorded in the British Isles. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Night of the Big Wind (Irish: Oíche na Gaoithe Móire) was a severe European windstorm which swept across Ireland on the night of January 6 - January 7, 1839 causing severe damage to property and several hundred deaths. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A view of the Tay Bridge from Dundee Tay Bridge, central section The Tay Bridge (sometimes unofficially the Tay Rail Bridge) is a railway bridge approximately two and a quarter miles (three and a half kilometres) long[1] that spans the Firth of Tay in Scotland, between the city of... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Crew of the Ariel Gazelle, which survived the storm The Eyemouth Disaster was a severe European windstorm that struck the southern coast of Scotland, specifically Berwickshire, on October 14, 1881. ... Eyemouth Harbour. ...

Severe European windstorms in recent history

  • January 31, 1953-February 1, 1953. North Sea Flood of 1953. Considered to be Britain's worst natural disaster of the 20th century, claiming over two thousand lives in the UK and Netherlands. A storm originating over Ireland moved around the Scottish west coast, over Orkney, down the east coast of Scotland and England and across the North Sea to the Netherlands. Sea defences in eastern England and the Netherlands were overwhelmed. The ferry MV Princess Victoria, travelling between Scotland and Northern Ireland, was lost with 153 lives onboard, as was more than a quarter of the Scottish fishing fleet. In the Netherlands, flooding killed 1,835 people and forced the emergency evacuation of 70,000 more as sea water inundated 1.365 km² of land. An estimated 30,000 animals drowned, and 47,300 buildings were damaged of which 10,000 were destroyed. Total damage was estimated at that time at 895 million Dutch guilders.
  • September 17, 1961, 1961 Ex-Hurricane Debbie. Much of Scotland and the Northern Isles hit by severe gales, which were the residuals of Atlantic Hurricane Debbie.[2]
  • February 16, 1962, The Sheffield Windstorm, South Yorkshire (Northern England). The city experienced winds of at least 65 knots with reported gusts of 80 knots or more. These high wind speeds were very localised on the city area, possibly due to extreme lee-wave enhancement of the airflow downwind of the Pennines.
  • February 17, 1962, the North Sea flood of 1962. The above mentioned storm had moved south-east and reached the German coast of the North Sea with wind speeds up to 200 km/h. The accompanied storm surge combined with high tide pushed water up the Weser and Elbe, breaching dikes and caused extensive flooding, especially in Hamburg. 315 people were killed, around 60,000 were left homeless.
  • January 15, 1968, The 1968 Hurricane. This storm tracked north up the west coast of Scotland. In Glasgow, some 20 people were killed and 2,000 people made homeless, Ayrshire and Argyll also affected.
  • January 11-January 12, 1974. Record winds, sometimes of hurricane force, recorded in many parts of Ireland. The strongest ever sea level gust in Ireland, at exactly 200 km/h, was recorded in Kilkeel, County Down. Many trees and buildings were damaged and 150,000 homes were left without electricity.
  • October 15 and 16, 1987, Great Storm of 1987. This storm mainly affected southeastern England and northern France. In England maximum mean wind speeds of 70 knots (an average over 10 minutes) were recorded. The highest gust of 117 knots was recorded at Pointe du Raz in Brittany. In all, 16 people were killed in England and 4 in France. 15 million trees were uprooted in England. This storm received much media attention, not so much because of its severity, but because these storms do not usually track so far south, the trees and buildings are not used to such winds (indeed, in mid-October most deciduous trees still have their leaves and were therefore more susceptible to windstorm damage and, following weeks of wet weather, the ground was sodden, providing little grip for the trees' roots), the severity of the storm was not forecast until approximately 3 hrs before it hit and it struck after midnight, meaning hardly anyone was warned.[citation needed]
  • February 13, 1989. During this storm, a gust of 123 knots was recorded at the Kinnaird Lighthouse (Fraserburgh) on the north-east coast of Scotland. This broke the highest low-level wind speed record for the British Isles. Much higher (unofficial) windspeeds have been recorded on the summit of Cairn Gorm and on Unst in Shetland.
  • January 17, 1990. Severe gales swept the north coast of Scotland, and the Northern Isles. A gust of 109 knots was recorded on Fair Isle. The storm was tracked into continental Europe under the name "Daria".
  • January 25, 1990, Burns' Day storm. Widespread severe gales in England, Wales and southern Scotland. Isolated gusts of over 105 mph were recorded, causing extensive structural damage. The area affected by this winter storm was much greater than the October 1987 storm, as it tracked east into mainland Europe, where it was known under the name "Vivian" and caused severe damage, especially to forests. In total, insurance losses resulting from this storm totalled about US $6bn.[citation needed]. The next day saw storm "Wiebke" continuing the damage.
  • January 1, 1992, The New Year's Day Storm or Nyttårsorkanen. This affected much of northern Scotland and western Norway, unofficial records of gusts in excess of 130 knots (67 m/s) were recorded in Shetland, while Statfjord-B in the North Sea recorded wind gusts in excess of 145 knots (75 m/s). DNMI estimated the strongest sustained winds (10 min. average) to have reached 90 knots (45 m/s), comparable to a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson-skalaen. Very few fatalities, mainly due to the very low population of the islands and the fact that the islanders are used to very high winds.
  • January 4, 1998. Another intense secondary depression crossed Ireland and northern England. Severe gales also swept Wales and southern England. Widespread structural damage and power outages, and flooding along rivers and coasts.
  • December 26, 1998. The Boxing Day Storm. Severe gales over Ireland, northern England, and southern Scotland. Winds speeds of 103 mph were recorded at Prestwick airport, and 93 mph in Glasgow. Widespread disruption and power outages in Northern Ireland and southern Scotland. The Forth Road Bridge was fully closed for the first time since its construction in 1964.
  • December 29, 1998. Another severe gale tracks across Northern Ireland and Scotland.
  • December 3, 1999. Hurricane like storm Anatol hits Denmark and neighbouring countries. Killing 7 in Denmark alone. Pressure: 952.4 hPa. Wind speeds above 85 mph (38 m/s), gusts up to 115 mph (51 m/s).
  • December 26, 1999. On the 26th, 27th and 28th, France, Switzerland and Germany were hit by severe storms and rain. Over 100 people were killed, and the storm caused extensive damage to property and trees and the French and German national power grids. The first storm in the series, dubbed Lothar by European forecasters, rapidly developed just off of the French coast and swept inland. Each of these systems was associated with an intense jet stream aloft and benefitted from latent heat release through atmosphere-ocean exchange processes. "Lothar" and "Martin", as the second storm was dubbed, were extratropical cyclones and had a hurricane-like shape, with an eye at the center. In the first storm, a gust of 184 km/h was recorded at Ushant (Fr. Ouessant) in Brittany and in the second storm, the highest gust was of 200 km/h at Île de Ré in France.
  • October 30, 2000. A deep area of low pressure swept across the United Kingdom bringing gusts in excess of 90mph and severe flooding to Southern England, it was the strongest system of it's kind to hit the UK since the Burns Day Storm of 1990.
  • December 17, 2004. A storm generating 80 mph winds hit northern France, including Paris, killing 6 people and leaving thousands of homes without power.
  • January 8, 2005. Northern Europe was hit by the storm Erwin (German weather service), also called Gudrun by the Norwegian weather service, with sustained wind speeds of 126 km/h and wind gusts of 165 km/h. The storm caused a lot of financial damage in Sweden, where the forest industry suffered greatly from damaged trees, as more than 7,500,000 cubic metres (9,800,000 yd³) of trees were blown down in southern Sweden. About 341,000 homes lost power in Sweden and several thousand of these were out of power for many days and even weeks in some cases, as about 10,000 homes were still without power after three weeks. The international death toll was at least 17. In the space of 6 hrs, 250 000 000 trees were blown down, and after months of hard work, lorries and drivers from across Europe eventually transported the logs to several sites across the south of Sweden. One huge site was situated on a disused airfield, stretched for 2 km, 14 metres in height, and 10 piles in width. This was only 2% of the total logs stored, enough to create a 3m x 3m pile all the way to Australia.
  • January 11, 2005. On the evening of the 11th and early morning of the 12th, a ferocious gale swept across Northern Ireland and northwestern Scotland. Wind speeds of 124 mph (equivalent to a strong Category 3 hurricane) were recorded on North Rona and 105 mph on Barra in the Hebrides. Stormy seas combined with high spring tides and caused flooding in low-lying coastal areas. One fatality in Ireland and six in Scotland, including a family of five who were swept into the sea after fleeing their flooded house on Benbecula. At the height of the storm, 85,000 households in Scotland were without power. On the 13th, all Caledonian MacBrayne ferry services and train services in Scotland were suspended, and many roads were closed due to fallen trees. The Forth Road Bridge was closed for the first time since the 1998 Boxing Day Storm, and the Tay (Dundee) and Friarton (Perth) bridges were also closed to all traffic.
  • October 3, 2006. A powerful storm battered the south west coast of France with gusts of 150 km/h in the coastal areas. The storm up rooted many trees and many homes remained without power for many hours. 2 people were badly injured in a helicopter crash and 1 person died when his house was burnt down because he had to use a candle to light it.
  • November 2, 2006. In the afternoon of the second and in the night a storm made its way through the North Sea with gusts reaching 174 km/h in Denmark and southern Sweden.The countries affected were Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Germany and Scotland. The storm killed 15 people and detached an oil rig. It then was rescued and pulled back to safety.
  • January 10 and January 11, 2007. A strong depression north of Scotland brought high winds to most of the United Kingdom. With a central pressure of 950mbar sustained winds exceeded 60mph and a gust of 94 mph was recorded in Benbecula late on 10 January. Additional hurricane force gusts were recorded in Scotland. Gale force winds were recorded in the south of the United Kingdom and in the Midlands, and gusts of over 50mph affected the entire country. Northern areas received gusts of between 60 and 90 mph. Six fatalities have been confirmed along with several injuries. Five people were killed when a trawler sank off the coast near Wexford, in The Republic of Ireland and another person was killed near Taunton, Somerset when a tree crushed his car. Another trawler went missing. Two survivors were recovered. One woman went missing after falling overboard on a ferry near Falmouth. A supermarket in Wales had its roof damaged and residents across the United Kingdom reported other minor damage. 80,000 homes lost power in Wales. Flooding occurred in several areas, with several rivers overflowing. The Environment Agency issued 59 flood warnings. The depression was named Franz by the Free university of Berlin. A strong jet stream was also present at the time. This system was one of several strong storms to hit the United Kingdom during the winter of 2006–2007, possibly linked to the El Niño event taking place at the time.
  • January 14, 2007. The powerful storm Per hit south-western Sweden with wind gusts up to about 90 mph. Three people were reported dead in different storm related accidents, and thousands of trees were blown down, as well as thousands of households losing electricity. This storm also caused damage and flooding in Lithuania.
  • January 18, 2007. In the wake of Kyrill, already regarded as one of the most violent and destructive storms in more than a century, storm-warnings were given for many countries in western, central and northern Europe with severe storm-warnings for some areas. Schools in particularly threatened areas had been closed by mid-day, to allow children to get home safely before the storm reached its full intensity in the late afternoon. At least 53 people were killed as violent storms lashed northern and central Europe, causing travel chaos across the region. Britain and Germany were the worst hit with eleven people killed as rain and gusts of up to 99 mph (159 km/h) swept the UK and sustained windspeeds of up to 73 mph were recorded. Thirteen people were killed in Germany, with the weather station on top of the Brocken in the Saxony-Anhaltian Harz mountain range recorded wind speeds of up to 121 mph (195 km/h). Five people were killed during the storm in the Netherlands and 3 in France. The gusts reached 151 km/h at the cap gris nez and 130km/h in many places in north of France. In both Germany and the Netherlands the national railways were closed. At Frankfurt International Airport over 200 flights were cancelled.
  • June 25 and June 26, 2007. A rather unseasonal weather system brought gale force winds to the UK, but was more memorable for causing severe flooding, with many areas receiving more than a months' rainfall in a single day. The storm exacerbated existing flooding problems (caused by violent thunderstorms a week earlier) and areas such as Sheffield were worst affected. Over 102 flood warnings were issued, and by June 29 five people were dead, many areas flooded and there was severe damage to the Ulley reservoir,where cracks appeared in the dam wall, causing fears that it might collapse. 700 people were evacuated from the area. Over 3000 properties were flooded across the country and more than 3,500 people were evacuated from their homes. See June 2007 United Kingdom floods
  • November 7 and November 8, 2007. A strong european windstorm struck northern scotland. All schools in Orkney were closed and hundreds of homes lost power because of the bad weather that moved across the country. Gusts as high as 90mph were reported along with early snow for the scottish highlands. The Northlink ferry company cancelled sailings between Lerwick and Aberdeen. There were also reports of trees and roofs being blown down in the high winds. Trees were damaged by the high winds in Grampian. The combination of north-westerly winds exceeding 60 mph. Low pressure and high spring tides led authorities to believe severe flooding was inevitable in the east of England, and the order was given to close the Thames Barrier. These conditions were said by many to mirror the North Sea flood of 1953.

is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The North Sea flood of 1953 and the associated storm combined to create a major natural disaster which affected the coastlines of the Netherlands and England on the night of 31 January 1953 – 1 February 1953. ... The MV Princess Victoria sank on 31 January 1953 in the North Channel. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1961 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1961, and lasted until November 30, 1961. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg 1962 The North Sea flood of 1962 was a natural disaster affecting mainly the coastal regions of Germany and in particular the city of Hamburg in the night from February 16 to February 17, 1962. ... ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ... Weser watershed The Weser is a river of north-western Germany. ... This article is about a river in Central Europe. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ... Argyll, archaically Argyle (Airthir-Ghaidheal in Gaelic, translated as [the] East Gael, or [the] East Irish), sometimes called Argyllshire, is a traditional county of Scotland. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Downpatrick Area: 2,448 km² Population (est. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Satellite image of the powerful storm The Great Storm of 1987 occurred on October 15 and 16, 1987, when an unusually strong weather system caused hurricane force winds to hit much of the south of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... lighthouses near Pointe du Raz The Pointe du Raz is a promontory that extends into the Atlantic from western Brittany. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Deciduous forest after leaf fall Like many deciduous plants, Forsythia flowers during the leafless season For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Kinnaird Head is a headland or promontory projecting out into the North Sea from the east coast of Scotland. ... , Fraserburgh, called The Broch in Scots, is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ... Cairn Gorm is a mountain in the United Kingdom. ... Unst shown within Shetland Islands The worlds most comfortable bus shelter? Unst is one of the North Isles of the Shetland Islands, Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 12th  - Total 1,466 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lerwick ISO 3166-2 GB-ZET ONS code 00RD Demographics Population Ranked 31st  - Total (2005) 22,000  - Density 15 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Shetland Islands Council http://www. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... West cliffs, looking southwest towards Malcolms Head. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The Burns Day Storm occurred on January 25–26, 1990, over Northwestern Europe and is one of the strongest storms on record. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Norwegian Meteorological Institute (Norwegian Meteorologisk Institutt) is the Norwegian national institute for weather forecasts. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sumburgh Airport is the main airport serving Shetland in Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 12th  - Total 1,466 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lerwick ISO 3166-2 GB-ZET ONS code 00RD Demographics Population Ranked 31st  - Total (2005) 22,000  - Density 15 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Shetland Islands Council http://www. ... West cliffs, looking southwest towards Malcolms Head. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ... Power line redirects here. ... This article is about the town in England. ... North Pier is the oldest and largest of the three coastal piers in Blackpool, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For delivered electrical power, see Electrical power industry. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Boxing Day Storm (also called the Great Boxing Day Storm of 1998 or Hurricane Stephen) was an Atlantic wind storm that made landfall in northwest Ireland. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... The Forth Road Bridge is a suspension bridge in east central Scotland. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Infrared satellite picture of Anatol on December 3, 1999 at 16:25 UTC. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Anatol Anatol is the name given by the German Weather Service to a powerful storm that hit Denmark, south-west Sweden and north Germany on December 3, 1999. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lothar is the name of a low-pressure system that resulted in a violent extratropical cyclone sweeping across Central Europe on December 26, 1999, causing major damage in France, southern Germany, and Switzerland. ... Jet streams are fast flowing, relatively narrow air currents found in the atmosphere at around 12 km above the surface of the Earth, just under the tropopause. ... Ushant (in French Ouessant, in Breton Enez Eusa) is an island in the English Channel which marks the north-westernmost point of European France. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... The quays at Saint Martin en Ré. ÃŽle de Ré (formerly also ÃŽle de Rhé; in English Isle of Rhé) is an island off the west coast of France near La Rochelle, on the northern side of the Pertuis dAntioche strait. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 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The Tay Road Bridge is a road bridge in Scotland over the River Tay from Newport-on-Tay in the north east of Fife, to the City of Dundee. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... The Friarton Bridge is a road bridge across the River Tay in Scotland. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the country. ... Benbecula (Scottish Gaelic: Beinn na Faoghla, meaning the mountain of the ford) is an island of the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Irish town. ... Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Taunton is the county town of Somerset, England. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ... This article is about the country. ... (see also the List of environmental organizations) The Environment Agency (Welsh: Asiantaeth yr Amgylchedd) of England and Wales was created by the Environment Act 1995, along with the Scottish Environment Protection Agency. ... Although European Windstorms are not Hurricanes or tropical storms, the have in recent history to be powerful enough that officals gave them names. ... Jet streams are fast flowing, relatively narrow air currents found in the atmosphere at around 12 km above the surface of the Earth, just under the tropopause. ... This article is about the global coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Per was the name of a powerful storm with hurricane winds which hit the west coast of Sweden and Norway on the morning of 14 January 2007. ... Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Kyrill (IPA: ) is the name given to a low pressure area that evolved into an unusually violent European windstorm, forming an extratropical cyclone with hurricane-strength winds. ... The Brocken, or Blocksberg, is the highest peak (1142 meters) in the Germany, between the rivers Weser and Elbe. ... With an area of 20,447 km² and a population of 2. ... The Harz is a mountain range in northern Germany. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Ulley Reservoir is a reservoir located a few hundred metres to the west and downhill of the village of Ulley, 4 miles south of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. ... A Pizza Hut restaurant surrounded by flood water in Chesterfield, UK. Two kayakers make their way through a street in Yorkshire. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Thames Barrier is a flood control structure on the River Thames, constructed between 1974 and 1984 at Woolwich Reach, London. ...

See also

The Beaufort scale is an empirical measure for describing wind intensity based mainly on observed sea conditions. ... Although European Windstorms are not Hurricanes or tropical storms, the have in recent history to be powerful enough that officals gave them names. ... A fictitious synoptic chart of an extratropical cyclone affecting the UK & Ireland. ... Great Gale may refer to: Great September Gale of 1815 – New England Great Gale of 1824 – south west coast of England, 22–23 November 1824 Great Gale of 1861 – Hartlepool and the north east coast of England, Saturday 9 February 1861 Great Gale of 1865 – Table Bay, South Africa, 17... Great Storm may refer to: Great Storm of 1703 Great Lakes Storm of 1913 North Sea flood of 1953, also known as The Great Storm of 1953 Ash Wednesday Storm of 1962, also known as The Great Atlantic Storm of 1962 Great Storm of 1987 European windstorm Great Gale Category... Satellite image of the intense noreaster responsible for the North American blizzard of 2006. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... This is a list of natural disasters in the United Kingdom. ... List of United Kingdom disasters by death toll is a list of major disasters (excluding acts of war) which occurred in the United Kingdom or involved UK citizens, in a definable incident, where the loss of life exceeded 40. ... NOAA scientists observe severe weather using a mobile doppler radar and a helicopter (in the distance) Severe weather phenomena are weather conditions that are hazardous. ...

References

  1. ^ The Tay Bridge Disaster. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  2. ^ 1961 Hurricane/Tropical Data for Atlantic. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  3. ^ A Stormy Night on Fair Isle. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Great weather events: the UK east coast floods of 1953

  Results from FactBites:
 
European_windstorm (1088 words)
European windstorm From Sterwiki A European windstorm is a severe cyclonic storm that tracks across the North Atlantic towards north-west Europe in the winter months.
Severe gales (estimated to be Force 10-11) swept the east coast of Scotland, infamously resulting in the collapse of the Tay Rail Bridge and the loss of 75 people who were on board the ill-fated train.
Severe European windstorms in recent history January 31-February 1, 1953.
Cost of European windstorm estimated - Boston.com (136 words)
Reinsurance provider Platinum Underwriters Holdings Ltd. said Monday it initially estimated its losses from a January windstorm in Europe at $10 million to $20 million.
NEW YORK --Reinsurance provider Platinum Underwriters Holdings Ltd. said Monday it initially estimated its losses from a January windstorm in Europe at $10 million to $20 million.
Windstorm Kyrill caused widespread damage across several countries in Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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