FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > European Council
European Union

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the European Union
The European Council is a meeting of the heads of state or government of the European Union. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The European Union or EU is a supranational and international organization of 27 member states. ...


Treaties
Rome · Maastricht (Pillars)
Amsterdam · Nice · Reform
Institutions
Commission

President José Manuel Barroso
Current College (2004-2009) The treaties of the European Union are effectively its constitutional law, making up the EUs primary legislation. ... The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony Signatures in the Treaty The Treaty of Rome refers to the treaty which established the European Economic Community (EEC) and was signed by France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg on March 25, 1957. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty of European Union, TEU) was signed on February 7, 1992 in Maastricht, Netherlands after final negotiations in December 1991 between the members of the European Community and entered into force on November 1, 1993 during the Delors Commission. ... The Treaty of Maastricht which established the European Union, divided EU policies into three main areas, called pillars. ... Treaty of Amsterdam amending the Treaty of the European Union, the Treaties establishing the European Communities and certain related acts The Treaty of Amsterdam amending the Treaty of the European Union, the Treaties establishing the European Communities and certain related acts, commonly known as the Amsterdam Treaty, was signed on... Treaty of Nice The Treaty of Nice is a treaty adopted in Nice by the European Council to amend the two founding treaties of the European Union: the Treaty on European Union, or Maastricht Treaty, which introduced the Euro and the 3-pillar structure of the EU; the Treaty of... The Reform Treaty (also referred to as; future institutional settlement or new legal basis, among others) is a proposed replacement for the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe (European Constitution). ... There are currently five institutions of the European Union which govern the Union. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... François-Xavier Ortoli, Romano Prodi, José Manuel Barroso and Jacques Delors The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union bureaucracy. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, ) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician. ... The Barroso Commission is the European Commission that has been in office since 22 November 2004 and is due to serve until 31 October 2009. ...


Parliament

President Hans-Gert Pöttering
Members (2004-2009) Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... The President of the European Parliament oversees all the activities of the European Parliament and its constituent bodies. ... Hans-Gert Pöttering (often written as Poettering; born September 15, 1945 in Bersenbrück, Lower Saxony) is a German conservative politician (CDU), and has been President of the European Parliament since January 2007. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... This is a list giving breakdowns of the European Parliamentary session from 2004 to 2009. ...


Council

Presidency: Portugal (Luís Amado)
European Council: José Sócrates Established 1952 Presiding Country Portugal President Luís Amado President in Office José Sócrates Members 27 (at one time) Political parties 7, including: European Peoples Party Party of European Socialists Meeting place Justus Lipsius, Brussels, Belgium, European Union Web site http://www. ... The Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ... Luís Filipe Marques Amado (b. ... José Sócrates de Carvalho Pinto de Sousa, GCIH (pron. ...


Court of Justice

President · Members · Auditors
First Instance · Civil Service European Court of Justice building, Luxembourg The Court of Justice of the European Communities, usually called the European Court of Justice (ECJ), is the highest court of the European Union (EU). ... Vassilios Skouris, (b. ... As of August 17, 2006: Categories: | | | ... The European Court of Auditors is one of five institutions of the European Union. ... The Court of First Instance, created in 1989, is a court of the European Union. ... European Union Civil Service Tribunal, since December 2, 2005 a new specialised tribunal within the European Union institutional framework. ...

Elections
Last election (2004) · 2007 by-election
Next election (2009) · Constituencies
Parties · Parliamentary groups
Related topics
States · Enlargement · Foreign relations
Law · EMU · Other bodies · Agencies

Other countries · Atlas
 Politics Portal
view  talk  edit

The European Council (referred to as a European Summit) is the highest political body of the European Union[1] which meets around four times a year. It comprises the heads of state or government of the Union's member states along with the President of the European Commission. Its meeting is chaired by the member from the member state currently holding Presidency of the Council of the European Union.[2] Elections in the European Union gives information on election and election results in the European Union. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held from June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... In early 2007, Bulgaria and Romania will elect their members of the European Parliament for the first time. ... Elections to the European Parliament will be held in June 2006 in the then–27 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... European Parliament electoral system is proportional representation. ... The European political party, or formally political party at European level, is a type of political party organization in the European Union, eligible to receive funding from the Union. ... Political Groups in the European Parliament combine the MEPs from European political parties, informal European political blocs, and independents, into powerful coalitions. ... // Origins of the EU History of the European Union European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) Euratom Single market. ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... The European Union (EU) was created by six founding states in 1957 (following the earlier establishment by the same six states of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1952) and has grown to 27 member states. ... Foreign relations of the European Union Foreign relations of Austria Foreign relations of Belgium Foreign relations of Cyprus Foreign relations of the Czech Republic Foreign relations of Denmark Foreign relations of Estonia Foreign relations of Finland Foreign relations of France Foreign relations of Germany Foreign relations of Greece Foreign relations... The Law of the European Union is the unique legal system which operates alongside the laws of Member States of the European Union (EU). ... In economics, a monetary union is a situation where several countries have agreed to share a single currency among them. ... There are currently five institutions of the European Union which govern the Union. ... The agencies of the European Union (or decentralised bodies of the European Union) are bodies which are distinct from the European Unions institutions, in that they have not been created by the treaties but rather by acts of secondary legislation, in order to accomplish a very specific task. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... Head of state or Chief of state is the generic term for the individual or collective office that serves as the chief public representative of a monarchic or republican nation-state, federation, commonwealth or any other political state. ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... François-Xavier Ortoli, Romano Prodi, José Manuel Barroso and Jacques Delors The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union bureaucracy. ... Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ...


While the Council has no formal executive or legislative powers (it is a body, not an institution, of the Union), it deals with major issues and decisions taken are "a major impetus in defining the general political guidelines of the European Union". The Council meets at least twice a year; usually in the Justus Lipsius building, the quarters of the Council of the European Union (Consilium) of Brussels.[3][4][5] This body should be distinguished from the separate bodies of Council of the European Union and the Council of Europe. A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... There are currently five institutions of the European Union which govern the Union. ... The Justus Lipsius building is the headquarters of the Council of the European Union in Brussels. ... Established 1952 Presiding Country Portugal President Luís Amado President in Office José Sócrates Members 27 (at one time) Political parties 7, including: European Peoples Party Party of European Socialists Meeting place Justus Lipsius, Brussels, Belgium, European Union Web site http://www. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Established 1952 Presiding Country Portugal President Luís Amado President in Office José Sócrates Members 27 (at one time) Political parties 7, including: European Peoples Party Party of European Socialists Meeting place Justus Lipsius, Brussels, Belgium, European Union Web site http://www. ... Anthem Ode to Joy (orchestral)  ten founding members joined subsequently observer at the Parliamentary Assembly observer at the Committee of Ministers  official candidate Seat Strasbourg, France Membership 47 European states 5 observers (Council) 3 observers (Assembly) Leaders  -  Secretary General Terry Davis  -  President of the Parliamentary Assembly Rene van der Linden...

Contents

History

The first Councils were held in February and July 1961 (in Paris and Bonn respectively). They were informal summits of the leaders of the European Community and were started due to then-French President Charles de Gaulle's resentment at the domination of supranational institutions (e.g. the European Commission) over the integration process. The first influential summit was held in 1969 after a series of irregular summits. The Hague summit of 1969 reached an agreement on the admittance of the United Kingdom into the Community and initiated foreign policy cooperation (the European Political Cooperation) taking integration beyond economics.[6][1] This article is about the capital of France. ... Historic Town Hall of Bonn (view from the market square). ... The European Community (EC) was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... The European political cooperation (EPC) was introduced informally in 1970 in response to the Davignon report and was formalised by the Single European Act with effect from 1987. ...


The summits were only formalised in 1974, at the December summit in Paris, following a proposal from then-French President Valéry Giscard d'Estaing. It was felt that more intergovernmental input was needed following the "empty chair crisis" and economic problems. The inaugural Council, as it had become, was held in Dublin on 1975-03-10/1975-03-11 during Ireland's first Presidency of the Council of the European Union. In 1987 it was included in the treaties for the first time (the Single European Act) and had a defined role for the first time in the Maastricht Treaty. At first only two meetings per year were required, now there are on average four European Councils each year (two per presidency). The seat of the Council was formalised in 2002, basing it in Brussels (see Seat). In addition to usual councils, there are the occasional extraordinary councils, for example in 2001 the European Council gathered to lead the EUs response to those events.[6][1] Valéry Marie René Giscard dEstaing (born 2 February 1926) is a French center-right politician who was President of the French Republic from 1974 until 1981. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Established 1952 Presiding Country Portugal President Luís Amado President in Office José Sócrates Members 27 (at one time) Political parties 7, including: European Peoples Party Party of European Socialists Meeting place Justus Lipsius, Brussels, Belgium, European Union Web site http://www. ... The Single European Act (SEA) was the first major revision of the Treaty of Rome. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty of European Union, TEU) was signed on February 7, 1992 in Maastricht, Netherlands after final negotiations in December 1991 between the members of the European Community and entered into force on November 1, 1993 during the Delors Commission. ...


The meetings of the Council are seen by some as turning points in the history of the European Union. For example:[1] The European Union is a unique geo-political entity covering a large portion of the European peninsula. ...

For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... An Intergovernmental Conference (IGC) is the formal procedure for negotiating amendments to the founding treaties of the European Union. ... The Single European Act (SEA) was the first major revision of the Treaty of Rome. ... Coordinates: , Country Province Area (2006)  - Municipality 60. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty of European Union, TEU) was signed on February 7, 1992 in Maastricht, Netherlands after final negotiations in December 1991 between the members of the European Community and entered into force on November 1, 1993 during the Delors Commission. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... Treaty of Amsterdam amending the Treaty of the European Union, the Treaties establishing the European Communities and certain related acts The Treaty of Amsterdam amending the Treaty of the European Union, the Treaties establishing the European Communities and certain related acts, commonly known as the Amsterdam Treaty, was signed on... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... , For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... List of European Councils, by presidency, date, and location. ... Tampere ( , Tammerfors in Swedish) is a city in southern Finland located between two lakes, Näsijärvi and Pyhäjärvi. ... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... The Lisbon Strategy, also known as the Lisbon Agenda or Lisbon Process, is an action and development plan for the European Union. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... The European Union (EU) was created by six founding states in 1957 (following the earlier establishment by the same six states of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1952) and has grown to 27 member states. ...

Powers and functions

The European Council isn't an official institution of the EU, although it is mentioned in the treaties as a body which "shall provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development". Essentially it defines the EU's policy agenda and has thus been considered to be the motor of European integration. It does this without any formal powers, only the influence it has being composed of national leaders.[1][4] There are currently five institutions of the European Union which govern the Union. ... European integration is the process of political and economic (and in some cases social and cultural) integration of European states into a tighter bloc. ...


Due to such composition, the body brings together the executive power of the member states, having a great deal of influence outside the European Community: for example over foreign policy and police & justice. It also exercises the more executive powers of the Council of the European Union (the European Council could be described as a configuration of that body) such as the appointment of the President of the European Commission. Hence with powers over the supranational executive of the EU, in addition to its other powers, the European Council has been described by some as the Union's "supreme political authority".[6][2][5] The European Community (EC) was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The Common Foreign and Security Policy, or CFSP, was established as the second of the three pillars of the European Union in the Maastricht treaty of 1992, and further defined and broadened in the Amsterdam Treaty of 1999. ... Police and Judicial Co-operation in Criminal Matters is the third of the three pillars of the European Union, focusing on co-operation in law enforcement and combating racism. ... François-Xavier Ortoli, Romano Prodi, José Manuel Barroso and Jacques Delors The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union bureaucracy. ...


However, the body has been criticised by some for a lack of leadership, in part stemming from the weak structure of the body, meeting only 4 times a year for 2 days with no staff and no legislative decisions made.[8] Beyond the need to provide "impetus", the Council has developed further roles; to "settle issues outstanding from discussions at a lower level", to lead in foreign policy - acting externally as a "collective Head of State", "formal ratification of important documents" and "involvement in the negotiation of the treaty changes".[6][5] Head of state or Chief of state is the generic term for the individual or collective office that serves as the chief public representative of a monarchic or republican nation-state, federation, commonwealth or any other political state. ... Ratification is the act of giving official sanction to a formal document such as a treaty or constitution. ... The treaties of the European Union are effectively its constitutional law, making up the EUs primary legislation. ...


Composition

Officially the members of the Council consist of the heads of state or government of the Union, plus the Commission President (non-voting). When meetings take place, the national foreign minister usually attends with the leaders. The Commission President likewise is also accompanied by another member of the Commission. These are the members seen in the "Family photo" taken at each Council.[4][5][1]


Meetings can also include national ministers, including foreign ministers, other leading national positions (French Prime Minister), Commissioners as required. The Secretary General of the Council (and his/her deputy) is also a regular attendee. The position has become highly important due to its regular role in organising the meetings while also acting as the Union's High Representative. The President of the European Parliament usually attends to give an opening speech outlining the European Parliament's position before talks begin.[4][5][1] Categories: French government | France-related stubs | Prime ministers of France ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... The High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy is the main coordinator of the Common Foreign and Security Policy within the European Union. ... The President of the European Parliament oversees all the activities of the European Parliament and its constituent bodies. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


However the negotiations usual involve a large number of other people working behind the scenes. Most of those people however are not allowed into the conference room, except for two delegates per state to relay messages. At the push of a button members can also call for advice from a Permanent Representative via the "Antici Group" in an adjacent room. The group is composed of diplomats and assistance who convey information and requests. Translators are also required for meetings as members are permitted to speak in their own languages.[1] Chameleon, a symbol of the multilingualism of the European Union. ...


President-in-Office

The current President-in-Office is José Sócrates of Portugal
The current President-in-Office is José Sócrates of Portugal
See also: Presidency of the Council of the European Union and President of the European Council

The role of President-in-Office of the assembled European Council is performed by the head of government of state of the member state currently holding the Council Presidency. This presidency rotates every six months, with every three presidencies co-operating on a common programme in triplets, meaning there is also a new president of the European Council every six months. The agenda of the meetings are defined by the Presidency, hence it may be misused by the country holding the Presidency by pushing their national interests up the agenda. The presiding country may also have additional negotiators at the table.[2][5][1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2300x1773, 1367 KB) José Sócrates, primeiro-ministro de Portugal (Brasília, 9 de Agosto de 2006) José Sócrates, premier of Portugal (Brasília, Aug. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2300x1773, 1367 KB) José Sócrates, primeiro-ministro de Portugal (Brasília, 9 de Agosto de 2006) José Sócrates, premier of Portugal (Brasília, Aug. ... José Sócrates de Carvalho Pinto de Sousa, GCIH (pron. ... Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ... The European Council, sometimes informally called the European Summit, is a meeting of the heads of state or government of the European Union, and the President of the European Commission (not to be confused with the Council of the European Union, or the Council of Europe). ... A Chairman-in-Office or President-in-Office (CiO or PiO; French: président en exercice) is the ambassador, foreign minister, or other official of the member state holding the presidency of an international organization, who is the individual actually chairing the meeting of the representatives from member states. ...


The role as President-in-Office is in no sense equivalent to an office of a head of state, merely a primus inter pares (first among equals) role with other European heads of government. The President-in-Office is primarily responsible for preparing and chairing Council meetings, and has no executive powers. It does however offer external representation of the council and the Union and reports to the European Parliament after Council meetings and at the beginning and end of the Presidency.[2][5] Head of state or Chief of state is the generic term for the individual or collective office that serves as the chief public representative of a monarchic or republican nation-state, federation, commonwealth or any other political state. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Council Members

Member state Head of State / Government Title Political party Member since
Austria Gusenbauer, AlfredAlfred Gusenbauer Chancellor PES / Social Democratic Party of Austria 11 January 2007
Belgium Verhofstadt, GuyGuy Verhofstadt Prime Minister ELDR / Flemish Liberals and Democrats 12 July 1999
Bulgaria Stanishev, SergeySergey Stanishev Prime Minister PES / Bulgarian Socialist Party 1 January 2007
Cyprus Papadopoulos, TassosTassos Papadopoulos President Ind. / Dimokratikon Komma 1 May 2004
Czech Republic Topolánek, MirekMirek Topolánek Prime Minister MER / Civic Democratic Party 16 August 2006
Denmark Rasmussen, Anders FoghAnders Fogh Rasmussen Prime Minister ELDR / Venstre 27 November 2001
Estonia Ansip, AndrusAndrus Ansip Prime Minister ELDR / Estonian Reform Party 12 April 2005
Finland Vanhanen, MattiMatti Vanhanen Prime Minister ELDR / Centre Party 24 June 2003
France Sarkozy, NicolasNicolas Sarkozy President EPP / Union for a Popular Movement 16 May 2007
Germany Merkel, AngelaAngela Merkel Chancellor EPP / Christian Democratic Union 22 November 2005
Greece Karamanlis, KostasKostas Karamanlis Prime Minister EPP / New Democracy 10 March 2004
Hungary Gyurcsány, FerencFerenc Gyurcsány Prime Minister PES / Hungarian Socialist Party 25 August 2004
Ireland Ahern, BertieBertie Ahern Taoiseach AEN / Fianna Fáil 26 June 1997
Italy Prodi, RomanoRomano Prodi Prime Minister EDP / Olive Tree[1] 17 May 2006
Latvia Kalvītis, AigarsAigars Kalvītis Prime Minister EPP / People's Party 2 December 2004
Lithuania Kirkilas, GediminasGediminas Kirkilas Prime Minister PES / Social Democratic Party of Lithuania 4 July 2006
Luxembourg Juncker, Jean-ClaudeJean-Claude Juncker Prime Minister EPP / Christian Social People's Party 20 January 1995
Malta Gonzi, LawrenceLawrence Gonzi Prime Minister EPP / Nationalist Party 1 May 2004
Netherlands Balkenende, Jan PeterJan Peter Balkenende Prime Minister EPP / Christian Democratic Appeal 22 July 2002
Poland Kaczyński, JarosławJarosław Kaczyński Prime Minister AEN / Law and Justice 14 July 2006
Portugal[2] Sócrates, JoséJosé Sócrates Prime Minister PES / Socialist Party 12 March 2005
Romania Popescu-Tăriceanu, CălinCălin Popescu-Tăriceanu Prime Minister ELDR / National Liberal Party 1 January 2007
Slovakia Fico, RobertRobert Fico Prime Minister PES / Direction - Social Democracy 4 July 2006
Slovenia Janša, JanezJanez Janša Prime Minister EPP / Slovenian Democratic Party 9 November 2004
Spain Rodríguez Zapatero, José LuisJosé Luis Rodríguez Zapatero Prime Minister PES / Spanish Socialist Workers' Party 17 April 2004
Sweden Reinfeldt, FredrikFredrik Reinfeldt Prime Minister EPP / Moderate Party 6 October 2006
United Kingdom Brown, GordonGordon Brown Prime Minister PES / Labour Party 27 June 2007
European Commission[3] Barroso, José ManuelJosé Manuel Barroso President EPP / Social Democratic Party 23 November 2004
EU member states by the European political affiliations of their leaders, as of 11 January 2007.
  • ^  Portugal currently holds the Presidency of the Council of the European Union; José Sócrates, as Prime Minister of that member state, is the President-in-Office.
  • ^  Romano Prodi officially aligns himself only with his Olive Tree coalition rather than any member-party, but he was previously a member of Daisy-Democracy is Freedom's ancestor-party and is honorary president of its European parent, the EDP.
  • ^  José Manuel Barroso does not represent a member state, but sits in the European Council as the President of the Commission. He/She does not vote.

Party # QMV
European People's Party 9 108
Party of European Socialists 8 114
European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party 5 44
Alliance for Europe of the Nations 2 34
European Democratic Party 1 29
Movement for European Reform 1 12
Independent - Dimokratikon Komma 1 4
total 27 345

Alfred Gusenbauer (born February 8, 1960) has been the leader of the Social Democratic Party of Austria (SPÖ) since 2000. ... The Chancellor of Austria (in German: Bundeskanzler) is the head of government in Austria. ... The Social Democratic Party of Austria (German: Sozialdemokratische Partei Österreichs, or SPÖ) is one of the oldest political parties in Austria. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Guy Verhofstadt (help· info) (born April 11, 1953) is a Belgian politician, municipal councillor in Ghent and current Prime Minister of Belgium. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Belgium, known regionally as: Premier Ministre in French, Eerste Minister in Dutch, and Premierminister in German. ... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, mainly active in the European Union, composed of 49 national liberal and centrist parties from across Europe. ... The Vlaamse Liberalen en Democraten or VLD (Flemish Liberals and Democrats) is a Flemish liberal party, created in 1992 from the former PVV and a few other politicians from other parties. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Sergey Dmitrievich Stanishev (Bulgarian: Сергей Станишев) (born May 5, 1966), Bulgarian politician, is Chairman of the Bulgarian Socialist Party (BSP). ... Prime Ministers, 1879-1946 Todor Stoyanov Burmov 17 July 1879 - 6 December 1879 Archbishop Kliment Turnovski 6 December 1879 - 5 April 1880 Dragan Kiriakov Tsankov 5 April - 10 December 1880 Petko Karavelov 10 December 1880 - 9 May 1881 Johann Casimir Ernrot 9 May - 13 July 1881 Prince Alexander 13 July... The Party of European Socialists (PES) is a European political party whose members are 33 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well as Norway. ... The Bulgarian Socialist Party (Bulgarian: Bălgarska Socialističeska Partija or Българска социалистическа партия) (BSP or БСП) is a political party in Bulgaria and successor to the Bulgarian Communist Party. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Tassos Nikolaou Papadopoulos (Greek: Τάσσος Νικολάου Παπαδόπουλος; born January 7, 1934) has been the president of the Republic of Cyprus since 2003. ... The President of Cyprus is the countrys head of state. ... The Democratic Party (Greek: Dimokratikon Komma) is a liberal political party in Cyprus, founded in 1976 by Spyros Kyprianou. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mirek Topolánek (IPA: ) (born May 15, 1956 in Vsetín, Czechoslovakia, now Czech Republic) is the current prime minister of Czech Republic, from Civic Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of the Czech Republic. ... The Movement for European Reform is a pan-European alliance of national political parties founded on 13 July 2006, intended to group forces of the center-right in favour of free market policies and critical of further European integration. ... The Civic Democratic Party (Czech: Občanská demokratická strana - abbreviation: ODS) is the largest right-wing political party in the Czech Republic. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anders Fogh Rasmussen , also: (born January 26, 1953) is the current Prime Minister of Denmark (in Danish Statsminister, meaning State Minister). ... This is a list over the heads of government in Denmark, from the establishment of a constitutional monarchy in 1849 until present. ... Venstre[1] (IPA: , in Danish literally: Left), full name: Venstre, Danmarks Liberale Parti (Venstre, Liberal Party of Denmark) is the largest political party in Denmark, founded with a basis on free market Liberalism, now a right-of-centre party. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of Estonia (Estonian: Eesti Vabariigi Peaminister) is the head of government of the Republic of Estonia. ... The Estonian Reform Party (Estonian: Eesti Reformierakond) is a free market liberal party in Estonia. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Matti Taneli Vanhanen ( ) (born November 4, 1955, in Jyväskylä) is the current Prime Minister of Finland, as well as Chairman of the Centre Party. ... The Prime Minister (Finnish Pääministeri, Swedish: Statsminister) is the head of government in Finland. ... The Centre Party (in Finnish: Suomen Keskusta, ) is a centrist political party in Finland. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nicolas Sarkozy (IPA: —  ), (born Nicolas Paul Stéphane Sárközy de Nagy-Bocsa) on 28 January 1955 in Paris, France is the current President of France, elected on 6 May 2007 after defeating Socialist Party contender Ségolène Royal during the second round of the 2007 election. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire, UMP), is the main French centre-right political party. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...   (IPA: ) (b. ... The head of government of Germany is called Chancellor (German: Kanzler). ... The European Peoples Party (EPP) is the largest transnational European political party. ... The Christian Democratic Union of Germany (CDU — Christlich Demokratische Union Deutschlands) is the second largest political party in Germany. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Greek Prime Minister whose term began in 2004. ... Note on Greek names: There is no firm convention for the rendering of Greek personal names into English. ... Party logo New Democracy (ND, Greek: Νέα Δημοκρατία, Nea Dhimokratia), founded in 1974, is the main center-right liberal-conservative political party in Greece. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (pronounced []; born in Pápa, June 4, 1961) is the Prime Minister of Hungary. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Hungary: Prime Ministers of Hungary, 1848-1849 Count Lajos Batthyány: 17 March - 2 October 1848 Baron Ádám Récsey: 3 October - 26 November 1848 Lajos Kossuth: 26 November 1848 - 11 August 1849 Bertalan Szemere: 11 August - 13 August 1849 Prime... The Hungarian Socialist Party (Hungarian: Magyar Szocialista Párt, MSZP) is a socialist party in Hungary. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Patrick Bartholomew Bertie Ahern (Irish: ;[1] born 12 September 1951) is an Irish politician who, since 26 June 1997, has served as the tenth Taoiseach of Ireland. ... The Taoiseach (IPA: or ) — plural: Taoisigh ( or ), also referred to as An Taoiseach[1], is the head of government of Ireland or prime minister. ... The Alliance for Europe of the Nations is a pan-European political party that gathers nationalist parties from across the continent. ... Fianna Fáil – The Republican Party (Irish: ), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party in Ireland with 55,000 members. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...   (born 9 August 1939) is an Italian politician. ... In Italy, the President of the Council of Ministers (Italian: Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri) is the countrys prime minister or head of government, and occupies the fourth-most important state office. ... For the eurosceptic informal grouping, see European Democrats. ... For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aigars KalvÄ«tis (born June 27, 1966) is a Latvian politician and the current Prime Minister of Latvia. ... The Prime Minister of Latvia is the most powerful member of the Latvian government, and presides over the Latvian cabinet. ... The Peoples Party (Latvian: Tautas Partija) is a political party in Latvia. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gediminas Kirkilas ( (help· info), b. ... The Prime Minister of Lithuania is the head of the executive arm of Lithuanias government, and is chosen by the Lithuanian parliament. ... The Social Democratic Party of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos socialdemokratų partija) is the ruling political party in Lithuania, formed from the merger of the Democratic Labour Party of Lithuania and the Lithuanian Social-Democratic Party. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Claude Juncker Jean-Claude Juncker (born December 9, 1954) is the Prime Minister and Finance Minister of Luxembourg, and until July 1, 2005, was president of the European Council, a position he also previously held in 1997. ... See also: Politics of Luxembourg, List of Grand Dukes of Luxembourg, Lists of incumbents Categories: Lists of office-holders ... The Christian Social Peoples Party (Luxembourgish: Chrëschtlech Sozial Vollekspartei - CSV) is the largest political party in Luxembourg. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Lawrence Gonzi (born July 1, 1953) is the Prime Minister and finance minister of Malta. ... The Prime Minister of Malta is the most powerful figure within the government of Malta, although the President of Malta has higher rank. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan Peter Balkenende (pronounced  ) (born May 7, 1956) has been the Prime Minister of the Netherlands since July 22, 2002. ... The prime minister of the Netherlands is the head of the cabinet, and, as such, coordinates the policy of the government. ... The Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) (Dutch: Christen Democratisch Appèl) is a Dutch Christian-democratic political party. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...   IPA: [] (born June 18, 1949) has been the Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland since July 14, 2006 and is the chairman of Law and Justice (Polish: ), a party which he co-founded in 2001. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Poland. ... Then-Prime Minister Marcinkiewicz, Lech KaczyÅ„ski, and Maria KaczyÅ„ska during KaczyÅ„skis swearing in as President of Poland, December 23, 2005. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... José Sócrates de Carvalho Pinto de Sousa, GCIH (pron. ... Prime Ministers of the Constitutional Monarchy (1834-1910) First Republic Military Dictatorship Estado Novo Third Republic See also: List of Presidents of Portugal, Politics of Portugal, Lists of incumbents This article contains content from HierarchyPedia article Prime Minister of Portugal, used here under the GNU Free Documentation License. ... The Socialist Party (Portuguese: Partido Socialista, pron. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Călin Constantin Anton Popescu-Tăriceanu () (born January 14, 1952) is a Romanian politician, the current Prime Minister of Romania — since December 28, 2004. ... Categories: Lists of office-holders | Romanian history | Romanian Prime Ministers ... The Partidul NaÅ£ional Liberal (National Liberal Party) is a liberal party in Romania, and the second largest party in parliament, being edged out only by the Social Democratic Party. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Robert Fico (15 September 1964 in Topoľčany) is the current Prime Minister of Slovakia (since July 4, 2006). ... Chairman/President of the Provisional Government for Slovakia (1918; within Czechoslovakia) Vavro Šrobár (4 November 1918 – 14 November 1918) – ceased with the adoption of the Czechoslovak constitution Chairman of the Revolutionary Governing Council of the Slovak Soviet Republic (1919; in rebellion in eastern Slovakia) Antonín... The Direction - Social Democracy (Slovak: Smer - sociálna demokracia) party - before January 1, 2005 called Direction (the Third Way) (Smer (tretia cesta)) - , often just Smer, is a political party in Slovakia, led by Robert Fico. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Janez JanÅ¡a (born September 17, 1958 as Ivan JanÅ¡a) in Ljubljana is a Slovenian politician and head of the Slovenian Democratic Party since 1995. ... There have been five prime ministers of Slovenia since that country gained its independence in the breakup of Yugoslavia. ... The Slovenian Democratic Party (SDS — Slovenian: Slovenska demokratska stranka), previously the Social Democratic Party of Slovenia (Slovenian: Socialdemokratska stranka Slovenije) is a Slovenian right-wing party. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (IPA: []) (born August 4, 1960 in Valladolid) is the Prime Minister of Spain. ... The President of the Government of Spain (Spanish: Presidente del Gobierno), sometimes known in English as the Prime Minister of Spain, is the Spanish head of government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Fredrik Reinfeldt (IPA: ) (born August 4, 1965, in Österhaninge) is the current Prime Minister of Sweden and leader of the liberal conservative Moderate Party (Swedish: ). A native of Stockholm County, Reinfeldt joined the Moderate Youth League in 1983, and by 1992 had risen to the rank of chairman, a... The Prime Minister (Swedish: , literally Minister of State) is the head of government in Sweden. ... The Moderate Party (Swedish: Moderata samlingspartiet: The Moderate Coalition Party, commonly referred to as Moderaterna: The Moderates) is a liberal conservative political party in Sweden. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, ) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician. ... François-Xavier Ortoli, Romano Prodi, José Manuel Barroso and Jacques Delors The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union bureaucracy. ... The Social Democratic Party (Portuguese: Partido Social Democrata, pron. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1244 × 1244 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/png) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1244 × 1244 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/png) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ... For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... Daisy-Democracy is Freedom (full name in Italian: Democrazia è Libertà – La Margherita: Democracy is Freedom – The Daisy) is a centrist political Party in Italy. ... Qualified Majority Voting (QMV) is a voting procedure employed in the Council of the European Union for some decisions. ... The European Peoples Party (EPP) is the largest transnational European political party. ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) is a European political party whose members are 33 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well as Norway. ... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, mainly active in the European Union, composed of 49 national liberal and centrist parties from across Europe. ... The Alliance for Europe of the Nations is a pan-European political party that gathers nationalist parties from across the continent. ... For the eurosceptic informal grouping, see European Democrats. ... The Movement for European Reform is a pan-European alliance of national political parties founded on 13 July 2006, intended to group forces of the center-right in favour of free market policies and critical of further European integration. ... The Democratic Party (Greek: Dimokratikon Komma) is a liberal political party in Cyprus, founded in 1976 by Spyros Kyprianou. ...

Seat and meetings

The Justus Lipsius building, the headquarters of the European Council in Brussels.
The Justus Lipsius building, the headquarters of the European Council in Brussels.
Further information: List of European Councils

Meetings of the council usually take place four times a year (two per Presidency) in Brussels and last for two days, although this can sometimes be longer if contentious issues are on the agenda.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... List of European Councils, by presidency, date, and location. ...


Up until 2002, the venue of the council meeting rotated between member states, as its location was decided by the country holding the rotating presidency. However, the 22nd declaration attached to the Treaty of Nice stated that;[9] Treaty of Nice The Treaty of Nice is a treaty adopted in Nice by the European Council to amend the two founding treaties of the European Union: the Treaty on European Union, or Maastricht Treaty, which introduced the Euro and the 3-pillar structure of the EU; the Treaty of...

As from 2002, one European Council meeting per Presidency will be held in Brussels. When the Union comprises 18 members, all European Council meetings will be held in Brussels.

So between 2002 and 2004 half the councils were held in Brussels, and from the 2004 enlargement, all were. The European Council uses the same building as the Council of the European Union (the Justus Lipsius building). However some extraordinary councils still take place outside of the city in the member holding the Presidency; (Rome, 2003 or Hampton Court Palace in 2005). The European Council is due to move with the Council of the European Union to a new building, Résidence Palace, next to the existing building.[6][10] The choice of a single seat was due to a number of factors, such as the experience of the Belgian police in dealing with protesters (a protester in Gothenburg was shot by police) as well as Brussels having fixed facilities for the Council and journalists at every meeting. By having a permanent seat (that's the same as the Council), particularly since enlargement, it was expected the Council would integrate further into the Community framework, rather than continuing under heavy national influence, developing as a governmental body (some have argued it is already the de facto EU government).[6] The Justus Lipsius building is the headquarters of the Council of the European Union in Brussels. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Résidence Palace is a building in Brussels built in the interwar period which houses an international press centre. ... For other uses, see Gothenburg (disambiguation). ...


Future of the European Council

Tony Blair Bertie Ahern
Both Tony Blair and Bertie Ahern have been cited as possible
candidates to become the first Council President in 2009

There would be a number of changes to the European Council under the proposed Reform Treaty, which largely retains the reforms outlined in the rejected Constitutional Treaty.[11] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 443 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1394 × 1888 pixel, file size: 225 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Irish Taoiseach Bertie Ahern in Berlin, 25 May 2007. ... The Reform Treaty (also referred to as; future institutional settlement or new legal basis, among others) is a proposed replacement for the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe (European Constitution). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe The constitutional treaty as signed in Rome on 29 October 2004 by representatives of the EU member states The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe (TCE), commonly referred to as the European Constitution, was an unimplemented...


The treaty would make the European Council a formal institution, separate from the Council of the European Union (now the Council of Ministers). While the Council of Ministers would continue with the rotating presidency, the European Council would have a single, fixed, President of the European Council with a renewable two-and-a-half year mandate. The position would stay a non-executive, administrative role. It would have an important role in organising work and meetings, providing external representation (including working with the CFSP) and being able to call extraordinary meetings beyond the four that are now formally required to take place.[12] The European Council, sometimes informally called the European Summit, is a meeting of the heads of state or government of the European Union, and the President of the European Commission (not to be confused with the Council of the European Union, or the Council of Europe). ...


The role of the council is clearly separate from the Council, and primarily follows previous definitions. In separating from the Council of Ministers, the European Council gains no legislative power. It does however gain a greater say over police and justice planning, foreign policy and constitutional matters, including: the composition of the Parliament and Commission; matters relating to the rotating presidency; the suspension of membership rights; changing the voting systems in the treaties bridging clauses; and nominating the President of the European Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The High Representative, along with the new post of President, are the only formal changes in composition. Further more, under the "emergency break" procedure, a state may refer contenious legislation from the Council of Ministers to the European Council if it is outvoted in the Council, although it may still be outvoted in the European Council.[12][13][14] The Common Foreign and Security Policy or CFSP was established as the second of the three pillars of the European Union in the Maastricht treaty of 1992, and further defined and broadened in the Amsterdam Treaty of 1997. ...


Although there may be some informal changes; currently the President of Finland informally takes part in the European Council as s/he is responsible for the Finland's foreign policy outside the EU. This is along side the Prime Minister who deals with policy within the EU. Under the new treaty the Council becomes a formal EU institution and deals with foreign policy (making it EU policy). Hence, some see the President's attendance would no longer be justified.[15] The President of Finland is the Head of State of Finland. ... The Prime Minister (Finnish Pääministeri, Swedish: Statsminister) is the head of government in Finland. ...


There has been speculation on who would be the first (full time) President of the European Council, being dubbed as the President of the European Union. Currently the most common name is former British Prime Minister, Tony Blair.[16][17] This was backed up further when, in June 2007, French president Nicolas Sarkozy was the first leader to propose that Blair be the first president.[18] However in August of 2007, there has been specuation that Bertie Ahern, current Irish Taoiseach, could also be a contender.[19] In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Nicolas Sarkozy (IPA: —  ), (born Nicolas Paul Stéphane Sárközy de Nagy-Bocsa) on 28 January 1955 in Paris, France is the current President of France, elected on 6 May 2007 after defeating Socialist Party contender Ségolène Royal during the second round of the 2007 election. ... Patrick Bartholomew Bertie Ahern (Irish: ;[1] born 12 September 1951) is an Irish politician who, since 26 June 1997, has served as the tenth Taoiseach of Ireland. ... The Taoiseach (IPA: or ) — plural: Taoisigh ( or ), also referred to as An Taoiseach[1], is the head of government of Ireland or prime minister. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j van Grinsven, Peter (September 2003). The European Council under Construction (PDF). Netherlands Institution for international Relations. Retrieved on 2007-08-16.
  2. ^ a b c d How does the EU work. Europa (web portal). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  3. ^ European Council. Council of the European Union. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  4. ^ a b c d Consolidated versions of the treaty on European Union and of the treaty establishing the European Community (PDF). Europa (web portal) (1992-02-07). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g European Council. Europa (web portal). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Stark, Christine. Evolution of the European Council: The implications of a permanent seat (PDF). Dragoman.org. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  7. ^ EU Security Policy & the role of the European Commissio. European Commission. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  8. ^ Laming, Richard (2003-07-10). Too much champagne, not enough leadership. Open Democracy. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  9. ^ Treaty of Nice (PDF). Europa (web portal) (2001-02-21). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  10. ^ Reconstruction of "Residence Palacel. UIA Architectes (2005-09-26). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  11. ^ European Council (2007-06-22). Brussels European Council 21/22 June 2007: Presidency Conclusions (PDF). Europa (web portal). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  12. ^ a b The Union's institutions: The European Council. Europa (web portal) (2001-02-21). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  13. ^ Peers, Steve (2007-08-02). EU Reform Treaty Analysis no. 2.2: Foreign policy provisions of the revised text of the Treaty on the European Union (TEU) (PDF). Statewatch. Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  14. ^ Peers, Steve (2007-08-02). EU Reform Treaty analysis 1: JHA provisions (PDF). Statewatch. Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  15. ^ Experts calling for new decisions on role of President in EU policy. Helsingin Sanomat (2007-08-22). Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  16. ^ Hall, Ben (2007-05-03). New post of EU chief tempts Blair. Financial Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  17. ^ Parker, George (2007-05-10). Blair’s fate may be linked to EU. Financial Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  18. ^ Parker, George (2007-06-16). Push for Blair as new EU president. Financial Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  19. ^ Mahony, Honor (2007-08-27). Ireland speculates on Ahern becoming EU president. EU Observer. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europa (sometimes written EUROPA), the official web portal of the European Union, is designed to improve the public’s interaction with the EU institutions by quickly directing website visitors to the services or information they are seeking. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statewatch is a non-profit-making voluntary group founded in 1991 that monitors the state and civil liberties in the European Union. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statewatch is a non-profit-making voluntary group founded in 1991 that monitors the state and civil liberties in the European Union. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Helsingin Sanomat is the biggest subscription newspaper in Finland. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m