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Encyclopedia > Eupolis

Eupolis (ca. 446 BC-411 BC) was an Athenian poet of the Old Comedy, that flourished in the time of the Peloponnesian War. Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC Years: 451 BC 450 BC 449 BC 448 BC 447 BC - 446 BC - 445 BC 444 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 416 BC 415 BC 414 BC 413 BC 412 BC - 411 BC - 410 BC 409 BC 408... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Greek comedy is the name given to a wide genre of theatrical plays written, and performed, in Ancient Greece. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ...


Nothing whatever is known of his personal history. With regard to his death, he is said to have been thrown into the sea by Alcibiades, whom he had attacked in one of his plays, but it is more likely that he died fighting for his country. Alcibiades Cleiniou Scambonides (Greek: ; English /ælsɪbaɪədi:z/; 450 BC–404 BC), also transliterated as Alkibiades, was a prominent Athenian statesman, orator, and general. ...


He is ranked by Horace, along with Cratinus and Aristophanes, as the greatest writer of his school. With a lively and fertile fancy Eupolis combined a sound practical judgment. He was reputed to equal Aristophanes in the elegance and purity of his diction, and Cratinus in his command of irony and sarcasm. Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. ... Cratinus (c. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , ca. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , ca. ...


Although be was at first on good terms with Aristophanes, their relations subsequently became strained, and they accused each other, in most virulent terms, of imitation and plagiarism. For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ...


Of the 17 plays attributed to Eupolis, with which he obtained the first prize seven times, only fragments remain. Of these the best known were:

  • the Kolakes, in which he pilloried the spendthrift Callias, who wasted his substance on sophists and parasites;
  • Maricas, an attack on Hyperbolus, the successor of Cleon, under a fictitious name
  • the Baptae, against Alcibiades and his clubs, at which profligate foreign rites were practised.

Other objects of his attack were Socrates and Cimon. The Demoi and Poleis were political, dealing with the desperate condition of the state and with the allied (or tributary) cities. Hyperbolus (in Greek Υπέρβολoς, Hybérbolos) was an Athenian politician active during the first half of the Peloponnesian war, coming to particular prominence after the death of Cleon. ... Cleon (d. ... Alcibiades Cleiniou Scambonides (Greek: ; English /ælsɪbaɪədi:z/; 450 BC–404 BC), also transliterated as Alkibiades, was a prominent Athenian statesman, orator, and general. ... This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Tom Holt's historical novel The Walled Orchard features Eupolis as the narrator and protagonist. Tom Holt (born September 13, 1961) is an author of parodic mythopoeic fiction. ... The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

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Eupolis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (306 words)
He was reputed to equal Aristophanes in the elegance and purity of his diction, and Cratinus in his command of irony and sarcasm.
Although be was at first on good terms with Aristophanes, their relations subsequently became strained, and they accused each other, in most virulent terms, of imitation and plagiarism.
The Demoi and Poleis were political, dealing with the desperate condition of the state and with the allied (or tributary) cities.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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