FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Etruria" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Etruria
The area covered by the Etruscan civilzation.
The area covered by the Etruscan civilzation.

Etruria — usually referred to in Greek and Latin source texts as Tyrrhenia — was a region of Central Italy, located in an area that covered part of what now are Tuscany, Latium, Emilia-Romagna and Umbria. A particularly noteworthy work dealing with Etruscan locations is D.H. Lawrence's Sketches of Etruscan Places and other Italian essays. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x971, 405 KB) A map showing the extent of Etruria and the Etruscan civilization. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x971, 405 KB) A map showing the extent of Etruria and the Etruscan civilization. ... Central Italy, encompasses six of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Abruzzo Lazio Marche Molise Toscana Umbria Although the regions of Abruzzo and Molise are geographically located in Central Italy, the European office for statistics (Eurostat) lists these two regions within Southern Italy. ... Tuscany (Italian: ) is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Sketches of Etruscan Places and other Italian Essays, or Etruscan Places, is a collection of travel writings by D H Lawrence, first published posthumously in 1932. ...


The ancient inhabitants of Etruria are labelled Etruscans and their complex culture was centered on numerous city-states that rose during the Villanovan period in the ninth century BC and were very powerful during the Orientalizing and Archaic periods. The Etruscans were a dominant culture in Italy by 650 BC, surpassing other ancient Italic peoples such as the Ligurians, and their influence may be seen beyond Etruria's confines in the Po River Valley and Latium, as well as in Campania and through their contact with the Greek colonies in Southern Italy (including Sicily) Indeed, at some Etruscan tombs, such at those of the Tumulus di Montefortini at Comeana (see Carmignano) in Tuscany, physical evidence of trade, either directly with Egypt, or through intermediaries such as Greek or Etruscan sailors, has been found in the form of grave goods - particularly notable artefacts are some fine faience ware cups. Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... The Villanovans were a pre-Indo-European iron age people of northern Italy circa 1100-700 BC. They were followed by the Etruscans who may have evolved from them. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC 660s BC - 650s BC - 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC 600s BC Events and Trends Occupation begins at Maya site of Piedras Negras, Guatemala 657 BC - Cypselus becomes the... The Po (Latin: Padus, Italian: Po) is a river that flows 652 kilometers (405 miles) eastward across northern Italy, from Monviso (in the Cottian Alps) to the Adriatic Sea near Venice. ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... Carmignano is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Prato in the Italian region Tuscany, located about 20 km west of Florence and about 10 km southwest of Prato. ... Tuscany (Italian: ) is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ...


Rome was influenced strongly by the Etruscans, with a series of Etruscan kings ruling at Rome until 509 BC when the last Etruscan king Lucius Tarquinius Superbus was removed from power and the Roman Republic was established. The Etruscans are credited with influencing Rome's architecture and ritual practice; it was under the Etruscan kings that important structures such as the Capitolium, Cloaca Maxima, and Via Sacra were realized. Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and trends September 13, 509 BC - The temple of Jupiter on Romes Capitoline Hill is... Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (also called Tarquin the Proud or Tarquin II) was the last of the seven legendary kings of Rome, son of Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, and son-in-law of Servius Tullius. ... Temple of Jupiter on Capitoline Hill, 6th–1st century BC See Temple of Jupiter for temples to him in other places. ... The Cloaca Maxima was one of the worlds earliest sewage systems. ... The Via Sacra (Latin: Sacred Road) is the main street of ancient Rome, leading from the top of the Capitoline Hill, through some of the most important religious sites of the Forum (where it is the widest street), to the Colosseum. ...


The Etruscan civilization was responsible for much of the Greek culture imported into Republican Rome, including the twelve Olympian gods, the growing of olives and grapes, the Latin alphabet (adapted from the Greek alphabet), and architecture like the arch, sewerage and drainage systems. Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... Greece is often referred to as the cradle of Western culture and ancient Athens was considered its centre. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... Binomial name Olea europaea L. 19th century illustration The Olive (Olea europaea) is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, native to coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean region, from Lebanon and the maritime parts of Asia Minor and northern Iran at the south end of the Caspian... Species Vitis acerifolia Vitis aestivalis Vitis amurensis Vitis arizonica Vitis x bourquina Vitis californica Vitis x champinii Vitis cinerea Vitis x doaniana Vitis girdiana Vitis labrusca Vitis x labruscana Vitis lincecumii Vitis monticola Vitis mustangensis Vitis x novae-angliae Vitis palmata Vitis riparia Vitis rotundifolia Vitis rupestris Vitis shuttleworthii Vitis... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Voussoir, Keystone (architecture) be merged into this article or section. ... The word sewerage means the provision of pipes etc to collect and dispose of sewage. ... Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ...


The classical name Etruria was revived in the early 19th century, applied to the Kingdom of Etruria, an ephemeral creation of Napoleon I of France in Tuscany which existed from 1801 to 1807. Merchant flag of the Kingdom of Etruria. ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Cities

Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... Ancient Clusium was a Roman city, one of a succession found at the site. ... The ancient Perusia, now Perugia, first appears in history as one of the twelve confederate cities of Etruria. ... Veii - or Veius - was in ancient times, an important Etrurian city 18 km NNW of Rome, Italy. ... Volci or Vulci is a Latinized form of an Etruscan city, which the Etruscans called Velch. ... Velzna was an Etruscan city in central Italy, the last Etruscan city to be taken by the Romans. ...

External link

  • Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria, by George Dennis, an overview of Etruscan civilization

  Results from FactBites:
 
Etruria: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (602 words)
Etruria was inhabited by the Etruscans, who established a civilization by the 7th century
The ancient of Etruria are labelled Etruscans and their complex culture was centered on numerous city-states that rose during the Villanovan period in the ninth century BC and were very powerful during the Orientalizing and Archaic periods.
The classical name Etruria was revived in the early 19th century, applied to the Kingdom of Etruria, an ephemeral creation of Napoleon I of France in Tuscany which existed from 1801 to 1807.
Etruria - LoveToKnow 1911 (547 words)
ETRURIA, an ancient district of Italy, the extent of which varied considerably, and, especially in the earliest periods, is very difficult to define (see section Language).
The authentic history of Etruria is very meagre, and consists mainly in the story of its relations with Carthage, Greece and Rome.
In 474 the Etruscan fleet was destroyed by Hiero I. of Syracuse; Etruria Circumpadana was occupied by the Gauls, the Campanian cities by the Samnites, who took Capua (see Campania) in 423, and in 396, after a ten years' siege, Veii fell to the Romans.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m