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Encyclopedia > Ethelwin

Ethelwin[1] was the last Anglo-Saxon bishop of Durham (1056-1071), the last who was not also a secular ruler, and the only English bishop at the time of the Norman Conquest who did not remain loyal to William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Events Anselm of Canterbury leaves Italy. ... Events Byzantine Empire loses Battle of Manzikert to Turkish army under Alp Arslan. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ...


He was intially loyal to William. When the king sent Robert de Comines north as earl of Northumbria with 700 men in 1068, Ethelwin warned him at Durham that an local army was mobilised against him. He ignored the advice and, on 28 January 1069, the rebels converged on Durham and killed many of his men in the streets, eventually setting fire to the bishop's house where Robert was staying. He was consumed in the blaze. Northumbria had been in a state of near chaos since 1066, before the Conquest, and now things really flared up. Earl of Northumbria was a title in the Anglo-Danish, late Anglo-Saxon, and early Anglo-Norman period in England. ... Events Emperor Go-Sanjo ascends the throne of Japan William the Conqueror takes Exeter after a brief siege Births Henry I of England (d. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Harrying of the North- King William of England (William the Conqueror) reacts to rebellions made by his people against him. ...


At that juncture, Ethelwin abandoned the royalist camp. William promptly and without delay marched an army north, violently razing all the way in a scorched earth campaign generally known as the Harrying of the North. Ethelwin tried to flee with many Northumbrian treasures (including the body of Saint Cuthbert) to Lindisfarne, but he was caught, imprisoned, and later died in confinement; his see being temporarily left vacant until William appointed the Norman William Walcher, the first prince-bishop. The Harrying (or Harrowing) of the North was a series of campaigns waged by William the Conqueror, king of England, in the winter of 1069–1070 in order to subjugate the north of his newfound English kingdom (primarily Northumbria and the Midlands). ... Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (c. ... This article is about Lindisfarne, England. ...

Preceded by:
Ethelric
Bishop of Durham
10561071
Succeeded by:
William Walcher

Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Events Anselm of Canterbury leaves Italy. ... Events Byzantine Empire loses Battle of Manzikert to Turkish army under Alp Arslan. ...

Note

  1. ^ His name is variously spelled Egelwin, Aethelwyne, Aethelwine, Aethelwyn, or Aethelwin.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ethelwin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (101 words)
Look for Ethelwin in Wiktionary, our sister dictionary project.
Look for Ethelwin in the Commons, our repository for free images, music, sound, and video.
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Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Partney | British History Online (275 words)
The other, Aldewin, was the brother of Ethelwin, (Footnote 2) who was bishop of Lindsey in the time of Theodore: he had probably been educated in the monastic schools of Ireland.
Ethelwin and another brother Ethelhun had certainly been educated in Ireland.
The editors of Dugdale call Partney a cell of Bardney, apparently confusing the ancient monastery with the later hospital, which was called a cell of the abbey in the fourteenth century.
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