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Encyclopedia > Esther
Esther (1865), by John Everett Millais
Esther (1865), by John Everett Millais

Esther (Hebrew: אֶסְתֵּר, Standard Ester Tiberian ʾEstēr), born Hadassah, is a woman in the Hebrew Bible, the queen of Ahasuerus (commonly identified with either Xerxes I, Xerxes II, Artaxerxes I or Artaxerxes II), and heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. Book of Esther is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) Esther is the heroine of Book of Esther Esther is the title of a drama by Jean Racine (1689) Esther is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel (1718) Esther is a Lotus 7 inspired car made... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 1141 pixel, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Esther by Millais The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 1141 pixel, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Esther by Millais The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and... Sir John Everett Millais Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet, PRA (June 8, 1829 – August 13, 1896) was a British painter and illustrator and one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Ahasuerus or Ahasverus (Hebrew אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ, Standard Hebrew AḥaÅ¡veroÅ¡, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḫaÅ¡wÄ“rôš) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible and related legends and apocrypha. ... Xerxes I of Persia (sometimes known as Xerxes the Great, in old Persian, 𐎧𐏁𐎹𐎠𐎼𐏁𐎠[2]) was a king of Persia (reigned 486–465 BC) of the Achaemenid dynasty. ... Xerxes II was a Persian king and the son and successor of Artaxerxes I. After a reign of forty-five days, he was assassinated in 424 BC by his brother Sogdianus, who in turn was murdered by Darius II. He is an obscure historical figure known primarily from the writings... A sculpture dating back to the time of Achaemenid Empire Artaxerxes I (Artakhshathra I) was king of the Persian Empire from 465 BC to 424 The name as given is the Greek form; the Persian form is Artakhshathra. ... Artaxerxes II Memnon (c. ... The Book of Esther is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament. ...


As a result of Esther's intervention and influence, Persian Jews lived in Persia (modern Iran) for 2400 years thereafter. Esther's husband Ahasuerus followed in the footsteps of Cyrus the Great, in showing mercy to the Jews of Persia: Cyrus had decreed an end to the Babylonian captivity of the Jews upon his conquest of Babylon in 539 BC. Ahasuerus or Ahasverus (Hebrew אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ, Standard Hebrew Aḥašveroš, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḫašwērôš) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible and related legends and apocrypha. ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... Cyrus the Great figures in the Old Testament as the patron and deliverer of the Jews. ... For other uses, see Babylonian captivity (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC Events and Trends 538 BC - Babylon occupied by Jews transported to Babylon are allowed to return to...

Contents

The story of Esther

King Xerxes of Persia held a one hundred and eighty-day feast in Susa to display the vast wealth of his kingdom and the splendor and glory of his majesty. The King ordered his queen Vashti to appear before him and his guests wearing her crown, to show off her beauty. But when the attendants delivered the king's command, Queen Vashti refused to come. Furious at her refusal to obey, the King asked his wise men and the seven princes of Persia and Media what he should do to her, according to the law; they advised the King to depose Vashti to make her an example for other disobedient wives. The King followed this advice, then began searching for a new queen by means of a beauty contest. Beautiful young virgin women were gathered to the palace from every province. Esther was advanced for this role by Mordecai, her cousin and guardian. For 12 months each woman underwent beauty treatments in the harem, after which she would go to the King. When the woman's turn came, she was given anything she wanted to take with her from the harem to the King's palace. She would then go to him in the evening, and in the morning return to the harem as a concubine. She would not return to the King unless he was pleased with her and summoned her. Four years after Queen Vashti was executed, King Xerxes then chose Esther to be his wife and queen. Xerxes may refer to these Persian kings: Xerxes I, reigned 485–465 BC, also known as Xerxes the Great. ... For other uses, see Susa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... Concubinage refers to the state of a woman or youth in an ongoing, quasi-matrimonial relationship with a man of higher social status. ...


Shortly afterward, Mordecai overheard a plot to assassinate the King. He promptly told Esther of the plot, who warned her husband of the threat. An investigation was made and the conspirators were swiftly arrested and executed. As such, the King orders Mordecai's deed recorded in the history. For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ...


Soon after this the king granted Haman the Agagite and one of the most prominent princes of the realm, supreme authority over the kingdom. All the people were to bow down to Haman when he rode his horse through the streets. All complied except for Mordecai, who would bow to no-one but his God. This enraged Haman, who, with his wife and advisors, plotted against the Jews, making a plan to kill and extirpate all Jews throughout the Persian empire, selecting the date for this genocidal act by the drawing of lots. Esther 3:1-7 He gained the king's approval. He offered ten thousand silver talents to the king for approval of this plan but the king refused to take them.Esther 3:9-11 Mordecai tore his robes and put ash on his head on hearing this news. Esther sent clean clothes to him, but he refused them, explaining deliverance for the Jews would come from some other place (presumably God, as the Jews believe they are God's chosen people), but that Esther would be killed if she did not do what she could to stop this genocide - by talking to the King. Esther was not permitted to see the King unless he had asked for her, and if she did she could be put to death. Esther was terrified of this (she had not been called to the king in 30 days), so she and her maid-servants fasted and prayed earnestly for three days before she built up the courage to enter the king's presence. He held out his sceptre to her, showing that he accepted her visit. Esther requested a banquet with the king and Haman. During the banquet she requested another banquet with the King and Haman the following day. Haman is the villain in the Book of Esther. ... Extirpation is the localized extinction of a species. ...

Ahasuerus, Haman and Esther, by Rembrandt van Rijn, 1660.
Ahasuerus, Haman and Esther, by Rembrandt van Rijn, 1660.

After the banquet Haman ordered a gallows constructed, 75 feet high, on which to hang Mordecai. Meanwhile, the King was having trouble sleeping, and had some histories read to him. He was reminded that Mordecai had saved him from an assassination attempt, and had received no reward in return. That night the king called Haman and asked, "What should be done for the man whom the king delights to honour?" Haman thought the king meant himself, so he said that the man should wear a royal robe and be led on one of the king's horses through the city streets proclaiming before him, "This is what is done for the man the king delights to honour!" The king thought this was good, then asked Haman to lead Mordecai through the streets in this way, to honour him for previously telling the king of a plot against him. After doing this, Haman rushed home, full of grief. His wife said to him, "you will surely come to ruin!" That night, over the banquet, Esther told the king of Haman's plan to massacre the Jews in the Persian Empire, and acknowledged her own Jewish ethnicity. The king was enraged and ordered Haman to be hanged on the gallows he had built for Mordecai. The king then appointed Mordecai as his prime minister, and gave the Jews the right to defend themselves against any enemy. Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (July 15, 1606 - October 4, 1669) is generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history, and the most important United Provinces (Netherlands) painter of the seventeenth century. ...


A peculiarity of Persian law that also occurs in the Book of Daniel is that royal edicts of this sort could not be reversed, even by the king--by siding with the Jews instead of their persecutors the King presumably dissuaded any pogroms. The King also issued a second edict allowing the Jews to arm themselves, and this precipitated a series of reprisals by the Jews against their enemies. This fight began on the 13th of Adar, the date the Jews were originally slated to be exterminated. The Jews killed three hundred in Susa alone, killing seventy-five thousand (fifteen thousand in the Greek biblical account) in the rest of the empire. For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ... The Russian word pogrom (погром) refers to a massive violent attack on people with simultaneous destruction of their environment (homes, businesses, religious centers). ... Adar (אֲדָר, Standard Hebrew Adar, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḏār: from Akkadian adaru) is the sixth month of the religious year and the twelfth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ...


Jews established an annual feast, the feast of Purim, in memory of their deliverance. According to traditional Jewish dating this took place about fifty-two years after the return. Purim (Hebrew: פורים Pûrîm lots, related to Akkadian pūru) is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people of the ancient Persian Empire from Hamans plot to annihilate them, as recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther (Megillat Esther). ...

Edwin Long's Queen Esther
Edwin Long's Queen Esther

Esther appears in the Bible as a woman of deep faith, courage and patriotism, ultimately willing to risk her life for her adoptive father, Mordecai, and the Jewish people. Scripture portrays her as a woman raised up as an instrument in the hand of God to avert the destruction of the Jewish people, and to afford them protection and forward their wealth and peace in their captivity. It is notable, though, that God is not mentioned by name at any time in the Biblical Book of Esther but is inferred by reference to fasting. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Babylonian Marriage Market Edwin Long was a British painter who was born in Bath in 1829 and died in 1891 of pneumonia. ...


There is also a hidden plot in the story: Esther was a descendent of Kish from the tribe of Benjamin and a relative of King Saul; and Haman the Agagite was the descendant of King Agag of the Amalekites, who were nearly wiped out by Saul (Saul's reluctancy to do so cost him the throne of Israel in the eyes of God). The plot involves Haman's quest for revenge and Esther's redemption of Saul's mistake, saving the Jews from the last of the Amalekites and certain extinction.


For a discussion of the historicity of Esther, see Book of Esther. The Book of Esther is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament. ...


Modern retelling

In 1689, Jean Baptiste Racine wrote Esther, a tragedy, at the request of Louis XIV's wife, Françoise d'Aubigné, marquise de Maintenon. Year 1689 (MDCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jean Racine (December 22, 1639 - April 21, 1699) was a French dramatist, one of the big three of 17th century France (along with Molière and Corneille). ... Esther is the name of a play in three acts written in 1689 by the French dramatist, Jean Racine. ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Françoise dAubigné, marquise de Maintenon Françoise dAubigné, marquise de Maintenon (November 27, 1635 - April 15, 1719), the second wife of Louis XIV, was born in a prison at Niort. ...


In 1718, Handel wrote the oratorio Esther based on Racine's play. Year 1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... The oratorio Esther by George Frideric Handel (HWV 50) is generally acknowledged to be the first English oratorio. ...


The play entitled Esther (1960), written by Welsh dramatist Saunders Lewis, is a retelling of the story in Welsh. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Saunders Lewis (John Saunders Lewis), (October 15, 1893 - September 1, 1985), was a Welsh poet, dramatist, historian, literary critic and political activist. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


A movie about the story, Esther and the King


One of the parts of Amos Gitai's Exile series, called Esther is an updated version of the story. Amos Gitai (born 11 October 1950 in Haifa, Israel) is an Israeli film director. ...


There is a fictional book by Rebecca Kohn called The Gilded Chamber that retells the story.


A 1962 musical entitled Swan Esther was written by J. Edward Oliver and Nick Munns and has been performed by the Young Vic and some amateur groups. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The art of singing and dancing in a prepared fictional play has been a time-honored tradition ranging to the early days of civilization. ... The Young Vic is a theatre in the South Bank area of central London, which specialises in giving opportunities to young actors and directors. ...


A 1978 miniseries entitled The Greatest Heroes of the Bible starred Victoria Principal as Esther, Robert Mandan as Xerxes, and Michael Ansara as Haman. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Victoria Principal (born January 3, 1950[1] in Fukuoka, Japan) is an American actress, best known for her role as Larry Hagmans sister-in-law and Patrick Duffys wife, Pamela Barnes Ewing, Pam, on the long-running CBS nighttime drama Dallas from 1978 to 1987. ... Robert Mandan (born February 2, 1932 in Clever, Missouri) is an American actor. ... Michael Ansara (born April 15, 1922) is a stage, screen and voice actor. ...


A 1999 TV movie that follows the biblical account very closely, Esther. Starred Louise Lombard in the title role and F. Murray Abraham as Haman. Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Louise Lombard Louise Lombard (born 13 September 1971) is a British actress. ... Fahrid Murray Abraham[1] (born October 24, 1939) is an American actor. ...


In 2000, VeggieTales, a company that uses CGI vegetables to teach children lessons from the Bible in a comical way, released Esther... The Girl Who Became Queen. The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... VeggieTales is a series of English language childrens computer animated films featuring anthropomorphic vegetables and conveying moral themes based on Christianity and often compatible with Judaism. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Esther. ...


In 2005, biblical novelist Ginger Garrett released, Chosen: The Lost Diaries of Queen Esther 480-465 BC. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2006, Lightstone Studios, LLC released "Esther and the King," a live-action movie musical. It is part of the Liken Bible Series. See www.Likenit.com.


A 2006 movie about Esther and Ahasuerus, entitled One Night with the King, stars Tiffany Dupont and Luke Goss. It was based on the novel Hadassah: One Night with the King by Tommy Tenney and Mark Andrew Olsen. The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... One Night with the King is a film that was released in 2006 in the United States. ... Tiffany Dupont (born March 22, 1981) is an actress, known for playing the lead character, Hadassah, a Jewish girl, who will become the Biblical Esther, Queen of Persia, in the Hollywood film One Night with the King. ... Luke Damon Goss is a singer and actor from England, born 29 September 1968. ... Tommy Tenney (b. ...


In the 2006 Melbourne Fringe Festival, The Backyard Bard toured a Biblical Storytelling production of 'Esther', featuring four women storytellers telling the story word-for-word from the Biblical account. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Melbourne Fringe Festival is an annual alternative arts festival held in Melbourne, Australia. ...


In the anime Trinity Blood Esther is the main character, a nun with a star on her side. She is prophesied to be "the morning star" who will lead the people to peace. Serialized in Asuka Original run March 17, 2004 – Ongoing Volumes 9 TV anime Director Tomohiro Hirata Studio GONZO Network WOWOW, Animax Original run 28 April 2005 – 6 October 2005 Episodes 24 Trinity Blood ) is a series of Japanese light novels written by Sunao Yoshida with illustrations by Thores Shibamoto and...


A "pop opera" Luv Esther has toured the United Kingdom to much acclaim and was performed at London's Shaw Theatre on 8th and 9th May 2008 as part of the first Pentecost Festival weekend.


Esther is one of the five heroines of the Order of the Eastern Star. General Grand Chapter logo The Order of the Eastern Star is the largest fraternal organization in the world that both men and women can join. ...


Origin and meaning of her name

The Shrine of Esther and Mordechai in Hamadan, Iran

According to the Book of Esther (2:7), Esther was originally named Hadassah. Hadassah means "myrtle" in Hebrew and the name Esther is most likely related to the Median word for myrtle, astra, and the Persian word setareh meaning star — the myrtle blossom resembles a twinkling star. The Targum provides another Midrashic explanation: that she was as beautiful as the Evening Star (or Morning Star), which is astara in Greek. In the Talmud, Tractate Yoma (29a), Esther is compared to the "morning star", and is considered the subject of Psalm chapter 22 because its introduction is a "song for the morning star." Image File history File links Esther and Mordechais shrine, Hamedan, Iran. ... Image File history File links Esther and Mordechais shrine, Hamedan, Iran. ... Mordecai or Mordechai (מָרְדֳּכַי, Standard Hebrew Mordoḫay, Tiberian Hebrew Mordŏḵay: Persian origin Contrition) - the son of Jair, of the tribe of Benjamin. ... Avicennas tomb in Hamedan Hamadan or Hamedan ( Persian: همدان ) is the capital city of Hamadan Province of Iran. ... The Book of Esther is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament. ... Species Myrtus communis L. Myrtus nivellei Batt. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Median Empire, ca. ... Farsi redirects here. ... This article is about the astronomical object. ... A targum (plural: targumim) is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) written or compiled in the Land of Israel or in Babylonia from the Second Temple period until the early Middle Ages (late first millennium). ... Evening Star may be: Venus as a brilliant Evening Star as seen near the cresent moon The planet Venus BR 92220 Evening Star, a BR standard class 9F locomotive and the last steam locomotive to be built by British Railways. ... Wikipedia articles with Morning Star, morning star or morningstar in the title include: Morning star (weapon), a spiked mace Morning Star (chief), a Cheyenne leader, also known as Dull Knife The Morning Star, a newspaper published in the U.K. since 1930 The Morning Star (19th century U.S. newspaper...


Esther can also be understood to mean "hidden" in Hebrew, and her name is interpreted thus in Midrash, where it is said that Esther hid her nationality and lineage as Mordecai had advised. Because the methods and aims of God are believed to be similarly hidden, "The Book of Esther" in Hebrew can be understood as "The Book of Hiddenness," representing God's hiddenness in the story. Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


It is also possible that Esther is derived from Ishtar, Akkadian for the Evening Star. (Despite resembling Indo-European words for star, the Semitic "Ishtar" is unrelated, the root beginning with a pharyngeal ayin and the sh sound derived from an earlier th sound.) "Ishtar" was worshipped throughout the Middle East as a goddess. Some critics of the historicity of the Book of Esther seized on this as evidence to support a view that the story of Esther derived from a myth about Ishtar. However, in Hebrew the goddess was referred to by the Hebrew cognate of her name - Ashtoreth. "Esther" cannot be derived directly from the latter. The Book of Daniel provides accounts of Jews in exile being assigned names relating to Babylonian gods and "Mordecai" is understood to mean servant of Marduk, a Babylonian god. "Esther" may have been a Hebrew rendition of a form of "Ishtar" in which the "sh" sound had become an "s" sound. Wilson, who identified Ahasuerus with Xerxes I and Esther with Amestris, suggested that both "Amestris" and "Esther" derived from Akkadian Ammi-Ishtar or Ummi-Ishtar [1]. Hoschander alternatively suggested Ishtar-udda-sha ("Ishtar is her light") as the origin with the possibility of -udda-sha being connected with the similarly sounding Hebrew name Hadassah. For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... Akkadian (lišānum akkadÄ«tum) was a Semitic language (part of the greater Afro-Asiatic language family) spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians. ... The pharynx is the part of the digestive system of many animals immediately behind the mouth and in front of the esophagus. ... or Ayin is the sixteenth letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew and Arabic (in abjadi order). ... The Book of Esther is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament. ... ‘Ashtart, commonly known as Astarte (also Hebrew or Phoenician עשתרת, Ugaritic ‘ttrt (also ‘Attart or ‘Athtart), Akkadian dAs_tar_tú (also Astartu), Greek Αστάρτη (Astártê)), was a major northwest_Semitic goddess, cognate in name, origin, and functions with the east-Semitic goddess Ishtar. ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... Marduk (Sumerian spelling in Akkadian: AMAR.UTU solar calf; Biblical: Merodach) was the Babylonian name of a late-generation god from ancient Mesopotamia and patron deity of the city of Babylon, who, when Babylon permanently became the political center of the Euphrates valley in the time of Hammurabi (18th century... Robert Dick Wilson at the Grove City Bible Conference in 1909. ... Insert non-formatted text here:This article is about the wife of Xerxes. ...

Esther and Mordecai, by Aert de Gelder
Esther and Mordecai, by Aert de Gelder

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1273, 197 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Esther Dimosthenis Liakopoulos ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1273, 197 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Esther Dimosthenis Liakopoulos ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... Aert de Gelder (Oct. ...

Esther in Christianity

Esther is commemorated as a matriarch in the Calendar of Saints of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod on May 24. The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which details the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by the Lutheran Church. ... LCMS redirects here. ...


Esther in Judaism

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Of all Biblical personages Moses has been chosen most frequently as the subject of later legends; and his life has been recounted in full detail in the poetic haggadah. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... -1... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... Phinehas or Pinhas - פִּינְחָס, Standard Hebrew Pinəḥas, Tiberian Hebrew Pînəħās is a name shared by two characters in the Hebrew Bible. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For information on the name Deborah, see Debbie For information on the nurse of Rebeccah, mentioned in Genesis, see Deborah (Genesis) Deborah or Dvora (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Bee) was a prophetess and the fourth Judge and only female Judge of pre-monarchic Israel in the Old Testament (Tanakh). ... The Prophet Samuel, fresco painting from the Mikhailovskr monastery of Kiev, c. ... Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; asked for) is identified in the Books of Samuel, 1 Chronicles and the Quran as the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ... David and Goliath, by Caravaggio, c. ... Jeduthun - lauder; praising - the name of two men in the Bible. ... This article is about the Biblical character . ... Gad was a seer or more commonly understood, a prophet in the Bible. ... Nathan the Prophet was a court prophet who lived in the time of King David and his wife Bathsheba. ... Ahijah HaShiloni, also known as Ahijah the Shilonite, was a prophet of Shiloh (1 Kings 11:29; 14:2). ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Isaiah in rabbinic literature. ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... See also Hoshea, who has the same name in Biblical Hebrew. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Book of Joel. ... Amos (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Burden) is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible, and putative author of the speeches reported in the Book of Amos. ... This article is about people named Obadiah in the Old Testament. ... For other uses, see Jonah (disambiguation). ... Jonah in rabbinic literature. ... Micah the titular prophet of the Book of Micah, also called The Morasthite He is not the same as another prophet , Micaiah son of Imlah. ... Nahum (נחום) was a minor prophet whose prophecy is recorded in the Hebrew Bible. ... Habakkuk or Havakuk (חֲבַקּוּק, Standard Hebrew Ḥavaqquq, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥăḇaqqûq) was a prophet in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Zephaniah or Tzfanya (צְפַנְיָה Concealed of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew Ẓəfanya, Tiberian Hebrew ṢəpÌ„anyāh) is the name of several people in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... An 18th century Russian icon of the prophet Haggai For the prophetic book, see Book of Haggai. ... Zechariah as depicted on Michelangelos ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Zechariah or Zecharya (זְכַרְיָה Renowned/Remembered of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) was a person in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... For the Northern Irish singer songwriter, see Malachi Cush. ... Image File history File links Christian_cross. ... Shemaiah was a prophet in the reign of Rehoboam (I Kings 12:22-24). ... Iddo (עדו also יעדו) was a minor biblical prophet, who appears to have lived during the reigns of King Solomon and his heirs, Rehoboam and Abijah in the Kingdom of Judah. ... Hanani was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Jehu was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Micah or Micha (מִיכָה, Standard Hebrew Miḫa, Tiberian Hebrew Mîḵāh) is the name of several people in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Jahaziel or Chaziel the Levite was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Eliezer (אֱלִיעֶזֶר / אֱלִיעָזֶר Help/Court of my God, Standard Hebrew Eliʿézer / Eliʿázer, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔlîʿézer / ʾĔlîʿāzer) was Moses and Zipporahs second son. ... Zechariah Ben Jehoida was the son or grandson of Jehoiada, the high priest in the times of Ahaziah and Jehoash (Joash). ... In the Bible, there were two prophets called Oded. ... Huldah was a prophetess mentioned briefly in the Second Book of Kings, Chapter 22. ... Uriah or Urijah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; (My) light/flame of/is the ) was the name of several men in the Hebrew Bible. ... Engraving of Sarah by Hans Collaert from c. ... Sarah in rabbinic literature // Sarah was the niece of Abraham, being the daughter of his brother Haran. ... This article is about the Biblical character. ... Rebecca by Johannes Takanen, 1877. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... Eli (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Ascent) was, according to the Books of Samuel, the name of a priest of Shiloh, and one of the last Israelite Judges before the rule of kings in ancient Israel. ... Elkanah was, according to the Books of Samuel, the husband of Hannah, and the father of her children including her first - either Samuel or Saul depending on whether it is those who take the Bible at face value or textual scholars (respectively) that are to be trusted[1]. Elkanah is... Hannah (or Chana) (Hebrew: ×—× ×” - Grace [of God]) was a wife of Elkanah and the mother of the prophet Samuel as recorded in the Book of Samuel. ... Abigail (אֲבִיגַיִל / אֲבִיגָיִל her Fathers joy or, fountain of joy ;leader of/is dance/, Standard Hebrew Avigáyil, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḇîḡáyil / ʾĂḇîḡāyil), once Abigal (Samuel 2 3:3), is a female character in the Bible. ... Categories: Hebrew Bible/Tanakh-related stubs | Hebrew Bible/Tanakh people ... Beeri, is the father of the prophet Hosea. ... Hilkiah was a Hebrew Priest at the time of King Josiah. ... Buzi (my contempt) was the father of the prophet Ezekiel. ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... Baruch ben Neriah was a Jewish aristocrat and scribe of the sixth century BCE. He was the disciple, secretary, and devoted friend of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah. ... Look up fratricide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... This article is about the Biblical figure called Daniel. ... Daniel in rabbinic literature // According to rabbinical tradition Daniel was of royal descent; and his fate, together with that of his three friends, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, was foretold by the prophet Isaiah to King Hezekiah in these words, and they shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king... Kenan or Qenan (Cainan seems to be an improper rendering of this word; it is separate from the word transliterated Cainan later in the Torah; the rendering Cainan is based off the Greek renderings, Kaïvav as found in Luke 3:36, 37) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; possession; smith) was a... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Noah in rabbinic literature. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... Edwin Longs 1886 painting of Batya finding the baby Moses Bithiah, in Hebrew Batya (בִּתְיָה, literally daughter of God), is the name given to a character in the account of the Hebrew Exodus from Egypt in Rabbinic Midrash, as she is not named in the text. ... Beor is the father of Balaam and is considered a prophet by Judaism because the Talmud says in Baba Bathra 15b Seven prophets prophesied to the heathen, namely, Balaam and his father, Job, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, Zophar the Naamathite, and Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite... Balaam (Hebrew בִּלְעָם, Standard Hebrew BilÊ»am, Tiberian Hebrew Bilʻām; could mean glutton or foreigner, but this etymology is uncertain), is a prophet in the Bible, his story occurring in the Book of Numbers. ... Balak was king of Moab around 1200 BC. Revelations 2:12 - 2:14 says about Balak: 12 `And to the messenger of the assembly in Pergamos write: These things saith he who is having the sharp two-edged sword: 13 I have known thy works, and where thou dost dwell... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... one of Jobs friends, probably a descendant of Eliphaz, son of Esau (Job 4:1). ... Bildad the Shuhite was one of Jobs three friends. ... In the Book of Job, Zophar or Tzófar (צוֹפַר Chirping; rising early, Standard Hebrew Ẓófar, Tiberian Hebrew ṢôpÌ„ar) is one of the friends of Job who visits to comfort him during his illness. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ...

Esther in rabbinic literature

see Esther in rabbinic literature Esther in rabbinic literature // A foundling or an orphan, her father dying before her birth, her mother at her birth, Esther was reared in the house of Mordecai, her cousin, to whom, according to some accounts, she was even married (the word , Esth. ...


Esther in Iranian tradition

Given the great historical link between Persian and Jewish history, modern day Persian Jews are referred to as "Esther's Children". Iranian tradition places Esther and Mordechai's burial in Hamedan, Iran. Avicennas tomb in Hamedan Hamadan or Hamedan ( Persian: همدان , Kurdish: Ekbatan) is the capital city of Hamadan Province of Iran. ...


See also

Vashti (ושתי) is mentioned in the Book of Esther, a book included in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... The Book of Esther is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament. ... For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... Marduk (Sumerian spelling in Akkadian: AMAR.UTU solar calf; Biblical: Merodach) was the Babylonian name of a late-generation god from ancient Mesopotamia and patron deity of the city of Babylon, who, when Babylon permanently became the political center of the Euphrates valley in the time of Hammurabi (18th century... Language(s) Persian languages, Hebrew, Judeo-Aramaic language Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Bukharan Jews, Kurdish Jews ,Mountain Jews ,Mizrahi Jews,Persians,Jews A modern-day synagogue in Iran. ...

Bibliography

  • Beal, Timothy K. The Book of Hiding: Gender, Ethnicity, Annihilation, and Esther. NY: Routledge, 1997. Postmodern theoretical apparatus, e.g. Derrida, Levinas
  • Berlin, Adele. “Esther” in JSB, 1623-1625
  • Jon Levenson Esther, an excellent commentary
  • Michael Fox Character and Ideology in the Book of Esther, 2nd ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmanns, 2001. 333 pp., excellent literary analysis
  • Sasson, Jack M. “Esther” in Alter and Kermode, pp. 335-341, literary
  • White, Sidnie Ann. “Esther: A Feminine Model for Jewish Diaspora” in Newsom

Jacques Derrida Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French literary critic and philosopher of Jewish descent, considered the first to develop deconstruction. Positioning Derridas thought Derrida had a significant effect on continental philosophy and on literary theory, particularly through his long-time association... Emmanuel Levinas (January 12, 1906 - December 25, 1995) was a Jewish philosopher originally from Kaunas in Lithuania, who moved to France where he wrote most of his works in French. ... This article is about the Canadian actor. ...

References

  1. ^ NeXtBible Study Dictionary, entry Ahasbai

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Esther

  Results from FactBites:
 
Daily Bible Study - Esther (497 words)
The Book Of Esther (see also By The Book) is the story of how a young orphaned Israelite girl from the tribe of Benjamin (Esther 2:5-7) rose from being a former prisoner-exile to Queen of Persia.
When orphaned at a young age, Esther was raised by her older cousin, Mordecai, who worked in the household of the Persian king (Esther 2:5-7).
Esther's role in the saving of the Jewish people came after Haman the Agagite, in effect the prime minister of Persia, managed to get a royal decree to kill all of the Jews throughout the Persian empire, which would then have included those who had returned to Jerusalem.
Esther - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (997 words)
Esther can also be understood to mean "hidden" in Hebrew, and her name is interpreted thus in Midrash, where it is told that Esther hid her nationality and lineage as Mordecai had advised.
Esther was the daughter of Abihail, a Benjamite.
Esther appears in the Bible as a woman of deep piety, faith, courage, patriotism, and caution, combined with resolution; a dutiful daughter to her adopted father, docile and obedient to his counsels, and anxious to share the king's favour with him for the good of the Jewish people.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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