FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Estes Kefauver
The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauver's victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported.
The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauver's victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported.

Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. A Time Magazine cover featuring Senator Estes Kefauver of Tennessee. ... A Time Magazine cover featuring Senator Estes Kefauver of Tennessee. ... The New Hampshire primary is the opening gun of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... A politician is an individual involved in politics to the extent of holding or running for public office. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 195 km 710 km 2. ...


Kefauver was born in Madisonville, Tennessee and attended the University of Tennessee and Yale University. A member of the Democratic Party, he served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1939 to 1949 and in the U.S. Senate from 1949 to his death in 1963. Madisonville is a town located in Monroe County, Tennessee. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the primary institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee system, Tennessees flagship public university. ... Yale redirects here. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other one being the Republican Party. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ...


After leading a much-publicized investigation into organized crime in the early 1950s, he twice sought his Party's nomination for President of the United States. In 1956, he was selected by the Democratic National Convention to be the running mate of presidential nominee Adlai Stevenson. Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ...


Kefauver in Congress

His political career began in 1938, when he was elected to the House of Representatives as a Democrat from the state's 3rd Congressional District, based in Chattanooga. He was reelected four more times. 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ...


As a member of the House during President Franklin D. Roosevelt's term in office, Kefauver distinguished himself from the other Democrats in Tennessee's congressional delegation, most of whom were conservatives, by becoming a staunch supporter of the President's New Deal legislation, particularly the controversial Tennessee Valley Authority. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... FDR redirects here. ... Conservatism is a philosophy defined by Edmund Burke as a disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve.[1] The term derives from conserve; from Latin conservare, to keep, guard, observe. ... This article is becoming very long. ... TVA logo The Tennessee Valley Authority is a New Deal agency created to generate electric power and control floods in a seven-U.S.-state region around the Tennessee River Valley. ...


His progressive stances on the issues put Kefauver in direct competition with E.H. Crump, the former U.S. Congressman, mayor of Memphis and "boss" of the state's Democratic Party, when he chose to seek the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate in 1948. During the primary, Crump and his allies accused Kefauver of being a "fellow traveler" and of working for the "pinkos and communists" with the stealth of a raccoon. In a televised speech given in Memphis, in which he responded to such charges, Kefauver put on a coonskin cap and proudly proclaimed, "I may be a pet coon, but I'm not Boss Crump's pet coon." After he went on to win both the primary and the election, he adopted the cap as his trademark and wore it in every successive campaign. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Edward Hull Crump (October 2, 1874–October 16, 1954) was a Memphis, Tennessee insurance broker, businessman, and political figure in the early 20th century. ... Nickname: The River City, The Bluff City Official website: http://www. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Type Species Ursus lotor Linnaeus, 1758 Species Procyon cancrivorus Procyon insularis Procyon lotor Raccoons are mammals native to the Americas in the genus Procyon of the Procyonidae family. ...


Despite opposition from the Crump machine, Kefauver won the Democratic nomination, which in those days was tantamount to election in Tennessee. His victory is widely seen as the beginning of the end for the Crump machine's influence in statewide politics. Once in the Senate, Kefauver began to make a name for himself as a crusader for consumer protection laws, antitrust legislation, and civil rights for African-Americans. These positions made him even more unpopular with his state party's machine than ever before, especially after he, fellow Tennessee Senator Albert Gore, Sr., and Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas became the only three southern Senators to refuse to sign the so-called "Southern Manifesto" in 1956. In fact, these unpopular positions, combined with his reputation as a maverick with a penchant for sanctimony, earned him so much enmity even from other Senators that one Democratic insider felt compelled to dub him "the most hated man in Congress." Kefauver is one of numerous public officials alleged to have had drinking problems during the time {http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1316/is_n12_v19/ai_6306545}. Consumer protection is government regulation to protect the interests of consumers, for example by requiring businesses to disclose detailed information about products, particularly in areas where safety or public health is an issue, such as food. ... Antitrust or competition laws are laws which seek to promote economic and business competition by prohibiting anti-competitive behavior and unfair business practices. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Albert Gore Sr. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... LBJ redirects here. ... Official language(s) See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 695,622 km²  (268,581 sq. ... The Southern Manifesto was a document written in 1956 by legislators in the United States Congress opposed to racial integration in public places. ... Maverick can refer to: Samuel Maverick, a Texas cattleman from whom the term maverick originated. ...


When he ran for reelection to a third term in 1960, his first and, it would turn out, last attempt at running for office after refusing to sign the Manifesto, he faced staunch opposition for renomination from his party's still-thriving pro-segregation wing and he only won the primary by a slim margin. During the general election itself, polls showed Kefauver's support to be near-nonexistent and it was later said that, on election day, no one outside of Kefauver's family could be found who would admit to having voted for him. Nevertheless, Kefauver swamped his opponent, winning an estimated 65% of the vote. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 This entry is related to, but not included in the Political ideologies series or one of its sub-series. ... Opinion polls are surveys of opinion using sampling. ...


In 1962, Kefauver, who had become known to the public at large as the chief enemy of crooked businessmen in the Senate, introduced legislation which would eventually pass into law as the Kefauver-Harris Drug Control Act. This bill, which Kefauver dubbed his "finest achievement" in consumer protection, imposed controls on the pharmaceutical industry which required that drug companies disclose to doctors the side-effects of their products, allow their products to be sold as generic drugs after having held the patent on them for a certain period of time, and be able to prove on demand that their products were, in fact, effective and safe. 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... A generic drug (pl. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or composition of matter (substance) (known as an invention) which is new, inventive, and...


On August 8, 1963, Kefauver suffered a massive heart attack on the floor of the Senate while attempting to place an antitrust amendment into a NASA appropriations bill which would have required that companies benefitting financially from the outcome of research subsidized by NASA reimburse NASA for the cost of the research. Two days after the attack, Kefauver died in his sleep. August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...


The Kefauver Committee

In 1950, Kefauver headed a U.S. Senate committee investigating organized crime. The committee, officially known as the Senate Special Committee to Investigate Crime in Interstate Commerce, was popularly known as the Kefauver Committee or the Kefauver hearings. The Committee held hearings in fourteen cities and heard testimony from over 600 witnesses. Many of the witnesses were high-profile crime bosses, including such well-known names as Willie Moretti, Joe Adonis, and Frank Costello, the latter making himself famous by refusing to allow his face to be filmed during his questioning and then staging a much-publicized walkout. A number of politicians also appeared before the Committee and saw their careers ruined. Among them were former Governor Harold G. Hoffman of New Jersey and Mayor William O'Dwyer of New York City. The Committee's hearings, which were televised live just as many Americans were buying televisions, made Kefauver nationally famous and introduced many Americans to the concept of a criminal organization known as the Mafia for the first time ever. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Between 1950 and 1951, the Kefauver Committee held all of Americans attention. ... Willie Moretti (1894-October 4, 1951) was the cousin and Underboss to Frank Costello Willie Moretti, the supposed Mafia boss of New Jersey, was the muscle behind the Genovese family founders Frank Costello, Lucky Luciano and Meyer Lansky. ... Mugshot of Joe Adonis. ... Frank Costello (January 21, 1891 - February 18, 1973) was an Italian-American gangster who was one of the most powerful and influential Mafia bosses in American history. ... Harold Giles Hoffman (February 7, 1896–June 4, 1954) was an American politician who was the Republican Governor of New Jersey from 1935 to 1938. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Largest city Trenton Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq. ... William ODwyer (July 11, 1890 – November 24, 1964) was Mayor of New York from 1946 to 1950. ... Nickname: The Big Apple, The Capital of the World Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... The Mafia, also referred to in Italian as Cosa Nostra (Our Thing or This Thing of Ours), is an organized criminal secret society that evolved in mid-19th century Sicily. ...


Although the hearings boosted Kefauver's political prospects, they helped to end the twelve-year Senate career of Democratic Majority Leader Scott Lucas. In a tight 1950 reelection race against former Illinois Representative Everett Dirksen, Lucas urged Kefauver to keep his investigation away from an emerging Chicago police scandal until after election day, but Kefauver refused. Election-eve publication of stolen secret committee documents hurt the Democratic party in Cook County, cost Lucas the election, and gave Dirksen national prominence as the man who defeated the Senate majority leader. The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Scott Wike Lucas (1892 - 1968) was a 2-term United States senator from Illinois and Senate Majority Leader from 1948-1950. ... Everett McKinley Dirksen Everett McKinley Dirksen (January 4, 1896 – September 7, 1969) was a Republican U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois. ... Cook County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ...


Kefauver for President

In the 1952 presidential election, Kefauver decided to offer himself as a candidate for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. Campaigning in his coonskin cap, often by dogsled, Kefauver made history when he defeated President Harry S. Truman, the sitting President of the United States, in the New Hampshire primary. Although Kefauver would go on to win twelve of the fifteen primaries that were held that year, losing three to "favorite son" candidates, primaries were not, at that time, the main method of delegate selection for the national convention. Kefauver, therefore, entered the convention a few hundred votes shy of the needed majority. Although he began the balloting far ahead of the other declared candidates, Kefauver eventually lost the nomination to Governor Adlai Stevenson of Illinois. Stevenson, a one-term governor who was up for reelection in 1952, had previously resisted calls to enter the race, but he was nominated anyway by a "Draft Stevenson" movement that had been energized by his eloquent keynote speech on the opening night of the convention. He would go on to lose the general election to General Dwight D. Eisenhower in a landslide. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Dog sled A dog sled (or dogsled) is a sled pulled by one or more dogs used to travel over ice and through snow. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The New Hampshire primary is the opening gun of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969, popularly known as Ike) was an American soldier and politician. ...


Four years later, Kefauver once again offered himself as a candidate for the nomination. This time, he not only received active competition from Stevenson, but also from Governor W. Averell Harriman of New York, who was endorsed by former President Truman. Once again, Kefauver swept to an overwhelming victory in the primaries and, once again, he was defeated for the nomination by Stevenson at the convention. Kefauver's hopes were rekindled, however, when Stevenson decided to let the delegates themselves pick his vice-presidential nominee, instead of having the choice dictated to them. Although Stevenson preferred Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts be his running mate, he did not attempt to influence the balloting for him in any way, and Kefauver eventually received the nomination. Stevenson went on to lose the election to Eisenhower once again, this time by an even bigger margin than in 1952. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 141,205 km²  (54,520 sq. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq. ...

Preceded by:
Sam D. McReynolds
United States House of Representatives for Tennessee's 3rd District
1939-1949
Succeeded by:
James B. Frazier, Jr.
Preceded by:
Arthur Thomas Stewart
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Tennessee
1949-1963
Served alongside: Kenneth D. McKellar, Albert Gore
Succeeded by:
Herbert S. Walters
Preceded by:
John Sparkman
Democratic Party Vice Presidential candidate
1956 (lost)
Succeeded by:
Lyndon B. Johnson
United States Democratic Party Vice Presidential Nominees
CalhounVan BurenR JohnsonDallasButlerKingBreckinridge • H Johnson/Lane(SD), PendletonBlairBrownHendricksEnglishHendricksThurmanStevensonSewallStevenson • Davis • KernMarshallRooseveltBryanRobinsonGarner • Wallace • TrumanBarkleySparkmanKefauverL JohnsonHumphreyMuskieEagleton/ShriverMondaleFerraroBentsenGoreLiebermanEdwards

  Results from FactBites:
 
Estes Kefauver - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1216 words)
Kefauver was born in Madisonville, Tennessee and attended the University of Tennessee and Yale University.
Although Kefauver would go on to win twelve of the fifteen primaries that were held that year, losing three to "favorite son" candidates, primaries were not, at that time, the main method of delegate selection for the national convention.
Once again, Kefauver swept to an overwhelming victory in the primaries and, once again, he was defeated for the nomination by Stevenson at the convention.
96.10.kefauver.html (1742 words)
Estes Kefauver was born on July 26, 1903, in the small farming community of Madisonville in East Tennessee.
It was during the Democratic primary campaign in 1948 that Crump attempted to identify Kefauver in the minds of Tennessee voters as a fellow-traveler with communists and liberals by characterizing him as an instrument of unsavory "pinkos and communists" who worked on their behalf like the stealthy, nocturnal raccoon.
Pulling on a coonskin cap, Kefauver retorted, "I may be a pet coon, but I'm not Boss Crump's pet coon." Kefauver won, and the trademark of the coonskin cap stuck with "the Keef" for the remainder of his political career as a symbol of the independent, progressive, nonconformist type of political leadership that he represented.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m