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Encyclopedia > Erxleben

Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben (June 22, 1744 - August 19, 1777) was a German naturalist.


Erxleben was Professor of physics and veterinary medicine at the Georg-Augusta University in Göttingen. He wrote Anfangsgründe der Naturlehre and Systema regni animalis (1777).


  Results from FactBites:
 
Russell Erxleben - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (608 words)
Erxleben was raised in Seguin, Texas, where he was a stand-out as a high school kicker.
On September 18, 2000, Erxleben was sentenced by United States District Court Judge James R. Nowlin to 84 months in prison, and ordered to pay a total of $28 million in restitution and a one million dollar fine.
Erxleben's lawyers, the law firm of Locke, Liddell and Sapp, settled a related lawsuit for $22m in 2000.
Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (165 words)
Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben (June 22, 1744 - August 19, 1777) was a German naturalist.
Erxleben was Professor of physics and veterinary medicine at the Georg-August-University in Göttingen.
He was Dorothea Christiane Erxleben's son, who was the first woman in Germany to be promoted to a medical doctor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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