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Encyclopedia > Ernest Tubb
Ernest Tubb
Birth name Ernest Dale Tubb
Born 9 February 1914
Crisp (Ellis County),
Texas, United States
Died 6 September 1984 (aged 70)
Nashville, Tennessee
Genre(s) Country, Honky tonk
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, bandleader
Instrument(s) Singer, guitar
Years active 1939-1970s
Label(s) Decca
Website http://www.etrecordshop.com/

Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914September 6, 1984), nicknamed the "Texas Troubadour", was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. His biggest career hit song "Walking the Floor Over You" (1941) marked the rise of the honky-tonk style of music. In 1948-49, he was the first singer to record a hit version of "Blue Christmas," a song more commonly associated with Elvis Presley and his mid-1950s version. Another well-known Tubb hit is "Waltz Across Texas" (1965), which became one of his most requested songs and is often used in dance halls throughout Texas during waltz lessons. In the early 1960s, he recorded duets with then-newbie Loretta Lynn, including their hit "Sweet Thang". is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Bardwell Dam and Lake in Ellis County near the town of Ennis Ellis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... A vintage belt buckle from Gilleys, a large honky tonk featured in the movie Urban Cowboy. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A waltz (German: , Italian: , French: , Spanish: , Catalan: ) is a ballroom and folk dance in   time, done primarily in closed position. ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ...


Biography

Tubb was born on a cotton farm near Crisp, Texas (now a ghost town in Ellis County, Texas). His father was a sharecropper, so Tubb spent his youth working on farms throughout the state. He was inspired by Jimmie Rodgers and spent his spare time learning to sing, yodel, and play the guitar. At the age of nineteen, he took a job as a singer on a San Antonio radio station. The pay was low, so Tubb also dug ditches for the Works Progress Administration and then clerked at a drug store. In 1939 he moved to San Angelo, Texas and was hired to do a 15 minute afternoon live show on radio station KGKL. He drove a beer delivery truck in order to support himself during this time. During World War II he wrote and recorded a song titled "Beautiful San Angelo". For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Farm (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... For other uses, see Ghost town (disambiguation). ... Bardwell Dam and Lake in Ellis County near the town of Ennis Ellis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... Sharecropping is a system of farming in which employee farmers work a parcel of land in return for a fraction of the parcels crops. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... San Antonio redirects here. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ...


In 1936, Tubb contacted Jimmie Rodgers’s widow (Rodgers died in 1933) to ask for an autographed photo. A friendship developed and she was instrumental in getting Tubb a recording contract with RCA. His first two records were unsuccessful. A tonsillectomy in 1939 affected his singing style, so he turned to songwriting. In 1940, he switched to Decca records to try singing again and it was his sixth Decca release with the single "Walking the Floor Over You" that brought Tubb to stardom. Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... Throat after tonsillectomy A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure in which the tonsils are removed. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ...


Tubb joined the Grand Ole Opry in February, 1943 and put together his band, the "Texas Troubadours." He remained a regular on the radio show for four decades, and hosted the Midnight Jamboree after it. In 1947, Tubb headlined the first Grand Ole Opry show presented in Carnegie Hall in New York City. In 1965, he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame and in 1970, Tubb was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame was established by the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, Inc. ...


Tubb always surrounded himself with some of Nashville's best musicians. Jimmy Short, his first guitarist in the Troubadours, is credited with the Tubb sound of one-string guitar picking. From about 1943 to 1948, Short featured clean, clear riffs throughout Tubb's songs. Other well-known musicians to either travel with Tubb as band members or record on his records were Jerry Byrd, the phenomenal steel guitarist; Tommy "Butterball" Paige, who replaced Short as Tubb's lead guitarist in 1947. In 1949, Billy Byrd, the quintessential Tubb guitarist, joined the Troubadours, and brought jazzy riffs to the instrumental interludes, especially the four-note riff at the end of his solos that would become synonymous with Tubb's songs. Actually a jazz musician, Byrd--no relation to Jerry--remained with Tubb until 1959.


Another Tubb musician was actually his producer, Owen Bradley, who is honored with a statue of his likeness in front of one of Nashville's recording studios. Bradley played piano on many of Tubb's recordings from the 1950s, but Tubb wanted him to sound like Moon Mullican, the honky-tonk piano great of that era. The classically trained Bradley tried, but couldn't quite match the sound, so Tubb said Bradley was "half as good" as Moon. Therefore, when Tubb called out Bradley's name at the start of one of the piano interludes, the singer always referred to him as "Half-Moon Bradley." The cover of Bradleys biggest single as a performer, Big Guitar. ... Moon Mullican was an American country and western singer and pianist in the late 1940s and 1950s from Louisiana. ...


In the 1960s, Tubb was well known for having one of the best bands in country music history. The band included lightning-fingered Leon Rhodes, who later appeared on TV's Hee-Haw as the guitarist in the show's band. Buddy Emmons, another steel guitar virtuoso, began with Tubb in about 1958 and lasted through the early 1960s. Emmons went on to create a steel-guitar manufacturing company that bears his name. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Ernest Tubb never possessed the best voice. In fact, he missed some notes horribly on some recordings. When Tubb was recording "You Don't Have to Be a Baby to Cry" in 1949 and tried to hit a low note, Red Foley, his duet partner at the time, was sitting in the booth when somebody asked, "I bet you wish you could hit that low note." Foley replied, "I bet Ernest wishes he could hit that low note." Clyde Julian Red Foley ( June 17, 1910 - September 19, 1968) was a country music singer. ...


Tubb actually mocked his own singing. He told an interviewer that 95% of the men in bars would hear his music on the juke box and reply to their girlfriends, "I can sing better than him," and Tubb added that they would be right.


In 1976 Ernest Tubb posed for his official portrait in oil on canvass, painted by International artist Kenneth Hari. Although the first portrait was commissioned by the G.O.O., artist Kenneth Hari went on to paint over 25 more portraits of Ernest Tubb all from life sittings. The sitings took place at Ernest Tubb's home in Nashville, Tennessee. (circa 1976-1977)


But Tubb inspired one of the most devoted fan bases of any country artist – and his fans followed him throughout his career even until the 1970s when Tubb could only croak his songs and his band was probably the least talented bunch of Troubadours. However, Tubb would "bring the house down" every time he broke into "Waltz Across Texas" or another favorite.


Ernest Tubb died of emphysema at Baptist Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee. He is buried in Nashville's Hermitage Memorial Gardens. Modern fans may know Tubb primarily for the Ernest Tubb Record Shop in Nashville, which opened in May 1947. There is also an Ernest Tubb Record Shop in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Both places have been meeting places for country music stars and fans for decades. “Nashville” redirects here. ... Pigeon Forge is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, United States. ...


One of his sons, the late Justin Tubb, made a minor splash on the country music scene in the 1950s and roomed with a young, up-and-coming songwriter named Roger Miller in the late 1950s. A section of the album jacket for Golden Hits Roger Dean Miller (January 2, 1936 – October 25, 1992) was an American singer, songwriter, and musician. ...


Tubb ranked #21 in CMT's 40 Greatest Men of Country Music in 2003. CMT can refer to: Cadmium Mercury Telluride Canal Metropolitano Televisión Catalog Management Table Certified Market Technician Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Childrens Musical Theatreworks of Fresno, California Chip Multi Threading Comision del Mercado de las Telecommunicaciones, the Spanish communications industry regulator. ... The 40 Greatest Men of Country Music is a three hour television special held in 2003 by CMT. The special counted down the men who have made the greatest contribution to the genre, as well as leaving behind the greatest impact. ...


References

  • "Ernest Tubb". Country Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved Apr. 21, 2005.
  • Pugh, Ronnie (1998). "Ernest Tubb". In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 547-8.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ernest Tubb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (368 words)
Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 - September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music.
Tubb was born on a cotton farm near Crisp, Texas (now a ghost town).
Ernest Tubb died of emphysema at Baptist Hospital in Nashville.
Artist Biography - Ernest Tubb (235 words)
rnest Dale Tubb was born in Crisp, Texas in 1914.
Though Tubb sang locally while he was still in his teens, he was almost twenty years old before he got his first guitar.
Tubb was regulary on the charts through 1969 with such hits as "Goodnight Irene" (with Red Foley in 1950), "I Love You Because," "Missing in Action," "Two Glasses Joe" (1954), "Half a Mind", "Thanks A Lot", "Mr.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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