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Encyclopedia > Ernest Rutherford
Ernest Rutherford
Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson
Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson
Born August 30, 1871(1871-08-30)
Brightwater, New Zealand
Died October 19, 1937 (aged 66)
Cambridge, England
Residence England
Nationality New Zealand
Fields Physicist
Institutions McGill University
University of Manchester
Alma mater University of Canterbury
Cambridge University
Doctoral advisor J. J. Thomson
Doctoral students Mark Oliphant
Patrick Blackett
Hans Geiger
Niels Bohr
Cecil Powell
Teddy Bullard
Pyotr Kapitsa
John Cockcroft
Ernest Walton
Charles Drummond Ellis
James Chadwick
Ernest Marsden
Edward Andrade
Frederick Soddy
Edward Victor Appleton
Bertram Boltwood
Kazimierz Fajans
Charles Galton Darwin
Known for Being "the father" of nuclear physics
Notable awards Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1908
Notes
Note that he is the father-in-law of Ralph Fowler. Rutherford had a DSc (1900) from the University of New Zealand.

Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 187119 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a chemist (B.Sc. in chemistry and geology 1894, Canterbury College, New Zealand) and a physicist who became known as the "father" of nuclear physics. He pioneered the orbital theory of the atom through his discovery of Rutherford scattering off the nucleus with his gold foil experiment. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1908. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ernest_Rutherford2. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Brightwater is a town 20 kilometres southwest of Nelson in the South Island of New Zealand. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... McGill University is a publicly funded, co-educational research university located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... This page is about the New Zealand university. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Sir Joseph John “J.J.” Thomson, OM, FRS (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940) was a British physicist and Nobel laureate, credited for the discovery of the electron and of isotopes, and the invention of the mass spectrometer. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Marcus Mark Laurence Elwin Oliphant AC KBE (October 8, 1901 – July 14, 2000) was an Australian physicist and humanitarian who played a fundamental role in the development of the Atomic bomb. ... Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, Baron Blackett, OM , CH , FRS (November 18, 1897–July 13, 1974) was a British experimental physicist known for his work on cloud chambers, cosmic rays, and paleomagnetism. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Johannes (Hans) Wilhelm Geiger (September 30, 1882 – September 24, 1945) was a German physicist. ... Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cecil Frank Powell (December 5, 1903 _ August 9, 1969) was a British physicist, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1950 for his development of the photographic method of studying nuclear processes and for the resulting discovery of the pion (pi-meson), a heavy subatomic particle. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Edward Bullard is a geophysicist born into a wealthy brewing family in Norwich on September 21, 1907. ... Semenov (on the right) and Kapitsa (on the left), portrait by Boris Kustodiev, 1921 Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (Russian Пётр Леонидович Капица) (July 9, 1894 – April 8, 1984) was a Russian physicist who discovered superfluidity with contribution from John F. Allen and Don Misener in 1937. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... See also: John Cockroft (politician) Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (May 27, 1897 - September 18, 1967) was a British physicist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (October 6, 1903 – June 25, 1995) was an Irish physicist and Nobel laureate for his work with John Cockcroft with atom-smashing experiments done at Cambridge University in the early 1930s. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Charles Drummond Ellis (b. ... Sir James Chadwick, CH (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate who is best known for discovering the neutron. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Ernest Marsden (1888 - 1970), was a British-New Zealand physicist. ... Edward Neville Da Costa Andrade (December 27, 1887 - June 6, 1971), was an English physicist, writer and poet. ... Frederick Soddy in 1922. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Edward Victor Appleton (September 6, 1892 – April 21, 1965) was an English physicist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bertram Borden Boltwood (July 27, 1870 Amherst, Massachusetts - 1927, Hancock Point, Maine) was an American pioneer of radiochemistry. ... Kazimierz Fajans (sometimes referred to as Kasimir or Casimir; 27 May 1887 - 18 May 1975), was a Polish-American chemist who did valuable work on chemical bonding and on radioactivity and isotopes. ... Sir Charles Galton Darwin. ... Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ralph Howard Fowler (January 17, 1889 – July 28, 1944) was a British physicist and astronomer. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ... The Bohr model of the hydrogen atom () or a hydrogen-like ion (), where the negatively charged electron confined to an atomic shell encircles a small positively charged atomic nucleus, and an electron jump between orbits is accompanied by an emitted or absorbed amount of electromagnetic energy . ... For other uses, see Atom (disambiguation). ... Rutherford scattering is a phenomenon that was explained by Ernest Rutherford in 1911, and led to the development of the orbital theory of the atom. ... The nucleus of an atom is the very small dense region, of positive charge, in its centre consisting of nucleons (protons and neutrons). ... Top: Expected results: alpha particles passing through the plum pudding model of the atom undisturbed. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Early years

Ernest Rutherford was the son of James Rutherford, a farmer who had emigrated from Perth, Scotland, and his wife Martha (née Thompson), originally of Hornchurch, Essex, England.[1] His parents had moved to New Zealand "to raise a little flax and a lot of children". Ernest was born at Spring Grove (now Brightwater), near Nelson, New Zealand. His name was mistakenly spelt Earnest Rutherford when his birth was registered.[2] He studied at Havelock School and then Nelson College and won a scholarship to study at Canterbury College, University of New Zealand where he was president of the debating society among other things. In 1895, after gaining his BA, MA and BSc, and doing two years of research at the forefront of electrical technology, Rutherford travelled to England for postgraduate study at the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge (1895–1898), and he briefly held the world record for the distance over which electromagnetic waves could be detected. During the investigation of radioactivity he coined the terms alpha and beta to describe the two distinct types of radiation emitted by thorium and uranium. Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Hornchurch is a town in the London Borough of Havering in East London. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Brightwater is a town 20 kilometres southwest of Nelson in the South Island of New Zealand. ... The City of Nelson is situated very close to the centre of New Zealand. ... Wikinews has news related to: New Zealand boarding school closed due to gastro-enteritis outbreak Nelson College is a boys-only state secondary school in Nelson, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand University Bursary or Bursary was New Zealands standard secondary school leaving qualification gained at the end of NZ Form VII (= UK Upper Sixth Form). ... This page is about the New Zealand university. ... The former University of New Zealand existed as New Zealands only degree awarding university from 1870 to 1961. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Plaque, at old site Entrance, old site, Free School Lane The Cavendish Laboratory is the University of Cambridges Department of Physics, and is part of the universitys School of Physical Sciences. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Radioactivity may mean: Look up radioactivity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An alpha particle is deflected by a magnetic field Alpha particles or alpha rays are a form of particle radiation which are highly ionizing and have low penetration. ... Beta particles are high-energy electrons emitted by certain types of radioactive nuclei such as potassium-40. ...


Middle years

In 1898 Rutherford was appointed to the chair of physics at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where he did the work which gained him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1908. From 1900 till 1903 he was joined by the young Frederick Soddy (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1921) where they collaborated on research into the transmutation of elements. Ernest Rutherford had demonstrated that radioactivity was the spontaneous disintegration of atoms. He noticed that a sample of radioactive material invariably took the same amount of time for half the sample to decay — its "half-life" — and created a practical application for this phenomenon using this constant rate of decay as a clock, which could then be used to help determine the actual age of the Earth that turned out to be much older than most of the scientists at the time believed. McGill University is a publicly funded, co-educational research university located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Frederick Soddy in 1922. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... For other uses, see Atom (disambiguation). ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


In 1900 he married Mary Georgina Newton (1876-1945); they had one daughter Eileen Mary (1901-1930), who married Ralph Fowler. Ralph Howard Fowler (January 17, 1889 – July 28, 1944) was a British physicist and astronomer. ...


In 1907 Rutherford took the chair of physics at the University of Manchester. There he did the experiments along with Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden (Geiger-Marsden experiment) that discovered the nuclear nature of atoms. It was his interpretation of this experiment that led him to the Rutherford model of the atom having a very small positively charged nucleus orbited by electrons. He became the first person in 1919 to transmute one element into another when he converted nitrogen into oxygen through the nuclear reaction 14N(α,p)17O. In 1921, while working with Niels Bohr (who postulated that electrons moved in specific orbits), Rutherford theorized about the existence of neutrons, which could somehow compensate for the repelling effect of the positive charges of protons by causing an attractive nuclear force and thus keeping the nuclei from breaking apart. Rutherford's theory of neutrons was later proved in 1932 by his associate James Chadwick who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his discovery in 1935. Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... Johannes (Hans) Wilhelm Geiger (September 30, 1882 – September 24, 1945) was a German physicist. ... Sir Ernest Marsden (1888 - 1970), was a British-New Zealand physicist. ... Top: Expected results: alpha particles passing through the plum pudding model of the atom undisturbed. ... A stylised representation of the Rutherford model of a lithium atom The Rutherford model was a model of the atom devised by Ernest Rutherford. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... General Name, symbol, number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... This article is about the chemical element and its most stable form, or dioxygen. ... In nuclear physics, a nuclear reaction is a process in which two nuclei or nuclear particles collide to produce products different from the initial particles. ... Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Proton (disambiguation). ... Sir James Chadwick, CH (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate who is best known for discovering the neutron. ...


Later years

He was knighted in 1914. In 1919 he returned to the Cavendish as Director. Under him, Nobel Prizes were awarded to Chadwick for discovering the neutron (in 1932), Cockcroft and Walton for splitting the atom using a particle accelerator and Appleton for demonstrating the existence of the ionosphere. He was admitted to the Order of Merit in 1925 and in 1931 was created Baron Rutherford of Nelson, of Cambridge in the County of Cambridge, a title which became extinct upon his unexpected death in hospital following a hernia operation. Since he was a Lord, British protocol required that he be operated on by a titled doctor, and the delay cost him his life.[3] He is interred in Westminster Abbey alongside J. J. Thomson. The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... Sir James Chadwick, CH (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate who is best known for discovering the neutron. ... See also: John Cockroft (politician) Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (May 27, 1897 - September 18, 1967) was a British physicist. ... Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (October 6, 1903 – June 25, 1995) was an Irish physicist and Nobel laureate for his work with John Cockcroft with atom-smashing experiments done at Cambridge University in the early 1930s. ... For the DC Comics Superhero also called Atom Smasher, see Albert Rothstein. ... Sir Edward Victor Appleton (September 6, 1892 – April 21, 1965) was an English physicist. ... Relationship of the atmosphere and ionosphere The ionosphere is the uppermost part of the atmosphere, distinguished because it is ionized by solar radiation. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... Look up hernia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Sir Joseph John “J.J.” Thomson, OM, FRS (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940) was a British physicist and Nobel laureate, credited for the discovery of the electron and of isotopes, and the invention of the mass spectrometer. ...


Impact and legacy

His research, along with that of his protégé Sir Mark Oliphant, was instrumental in the convening of the Manhattan Project to develop the first nuclear weapons. He is famously quoted as saying: "In science there is only physics; all the rest is stamp collecting." He is also reputed to have stated that the idea of using nuclear reaction to generate useful power was "moonshine".[4] Sir Marcus Mark Laurence Elwin Oliphant AC KBE (October 8, 1901 – July 14, 2000) was an Australian physicist and humanitarian who played a fundamental role in the development of the Atomic bomb. ... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter A nuclear weapon derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions of fusion or fission. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Things named after Rutherford include:

On the side of the Mond Laboratory at the site of the original Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, there is an engraving in Rutherford's memory in the form of a crocodile, this being the nickname given to him by its commissioner, Rutherford's colleague Peter Kapitza. The initials of the engraver, Eric Gill, are visible within the mouth. General Name, Symbol, Number rutherfordium, Rf, 104 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 4, 7, d Standard atomic weight (265) g·mol−1 Electron configuration probably [Rn] 5f14 6d2 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 10, 2 Physical properties Phase presumably a solid Density (near r. ... Tycho crater on Earths moon. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Plaque, at old site Entrance, old site, Free School Lane The Cavendish Laboratory is the University of Cambridges Department of Physics, and is part of the universitys School of Physical Sciences. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... This page is about the New Zealand university. ... Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... McGill University is a publicly funded, co-educational research university located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Rutherford College is a co-educational state secondary school on the Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland, New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Waimea College is a secondary school in Richmond, Nelson, New Zealand. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Rangiora may refer to the following: Rangiora, an endemic New Zealand plant. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Macleans College is a secondary school in Auckland, New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Mount Roskill Grammar is a secondary school in the suburb of Mount Roskill, Auckland, officially opened in 1954. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... This article is about the city in New Zealand. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Shirley Boys High School (known as SBHS) is a single sex state (public) secondary school in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... This article is about the city in New Zealand. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... St. ... This article is about the city in New Zealand. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... Tanjong Katong Secondary School, or known affectionately as TK, is an Autonomous co-ed school in Katong. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... Rutherford College is the second oldest college of the University of Kent. ... Affiliations University Alliance Association of Commonwealth Universities European University Association Website http://www. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Loughborough University is located in the market town of Loughborough, Leicestershire in the East Midlands of England. ... Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... Rochester and Rutherford Hall is a hall of residence closely located to Canterbury University in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Aerial view of Rutherford Appleton Lab. ... , Abingdon (traditionally known as Abingdon-on-Thames) is a market town in Oxfordshire in Southern England. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... , Abingdon (traditionally known as Abingdon-on-Thames) is a market town in Oxfordshire in Southern England. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Location of Carlsbad within San Diego County, California. ... Brightwater is a town 20 kilometres southwest of Nelson in the South Island of New Zealand. ... Plaque, at old site Entrance, old site, Free School Lane The Cavendish Laboratory is the University of Cambridges Department of Physics, and is part of the universitys School of Physical Sciences. ... Semenov (on the right) and Kapitsa (on the left), portrait by Boris Kustodiev, 1921 Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (Russian Пётр Леонидович Капица) (July 9, 1894 – April 8, 1984) was a Russian physicist who discovered superfluidity with contribution from John F. Allen and Don Misener in 1937. ... Arthur Eric Rowton Gill (February 22, 1882–November 17, 1940) was a British sculptor, typographer and engraver. ...

Rutherford was known as "the crocodile". Engraving by Eric Gill at the original Cavendish site in Cambridge.
Rutherford was known as "the crocodile". Engraving by Eric Gill at the original Cavendish site in Cambridge.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2018x2337, 975 KB) Summary Le crocodile de Rutherford sur un mur de lancien laboratoire Cavendish, Cambridge,Royaume-Uni, photo personnelle Rutherfords crocodile on a wall of the Old Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, United-Kingdom, own picture 02/12/2005, St... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2018x2337, 975 KB) Summary Le crocodile de Rutherford sur un mur de lancien laboratoire Cavendish, Cambridge,Royaume-Uni, photo personnelle Rutherfords crocodile on a wall of the Old Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, United-Kingdom, own picture 02/12/2005, St... Arthur Eric Rowton Gill (February 22, 1882–November 17, 1940) was a British sculptor, typographer and engraver. ...

Rutherford's works

  • Radio-activity (1904), 2nd ed. (1905), ISBN 978-1-60355-058-1
  • Radioactive Transformations (1906), ISBN 978-160355-054-3
  • Radiations from Radioactive Substances (1919)
  • The Electrical Structure of Matter (1926)
  • The Artificial Transmutation of the Elements (1933)
  • The Newer Alchemy (1937)

References

  1. ^ An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand 1966, accessed 13 May 2007
  2. ^ Campbell, John. 'Rutherford, Ernest 1871 - 1937'. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, updated 22 June 2007
  3. ^ Book review of Rutherford, Scientist Supreme by J. Campbell
  4. ^ Rutherford Quotes
  5. ^ ACS Article on Rutherfordium
  6. ^ Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • R. H. Cragg (1971). "Lord Ernest Rutherford of Nelson (1871–1937)". Royal Institute of Chemistry Reviews (4): 129 - 145. doi:10.1039/RR9710400129. 
  • E. Marsden (1954). "The Rutherford Memorial Lecture, 1954. Rutherford-His Life and Work, 1871-1937". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A 226 (1166): 283-305. 

A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ...

External links

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Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Charles Sherrington
President of the Royal Society
1925 – 1930
Succeeded by
Sir Frederick Hopkins
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New Creation
Baron Rutherford of Nelson
1931-1937
Succeeded by
Extinct
Persondata
NAME Rutherford, Ernst
ALTERNATIVE NAMES 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson
SHORT DESCRIPTION New Zealander nuclear physicist
DATE OF BIRTH 30 August 1871 CE
PLACE OF BIRTH Spring Grove, near Nelson, New Zealand
DATE OF DEATH 19 October 1937
PLACE OF DEATH Cambridge, England

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ernest Rutherford - Biography (1235 words)
Ernest Rutherford was born on August 30, 1871, in Nelson, New Zealand, the fourth child and second son in a family of seven sons and five daughters.
Rutherford returned to England in 1907 to become Langworthy Professor of Physics in the University of Manchester, succeeding Sir Arthur Schuster, and in 1919 he accepted an invitation to succeed Sir Joseph Thomson as Cavendish Professor of Physics at Cambridge.
At Manchester, Rutherford continued his research on the properties of the radium emanation and of the alpha rays and, in conjunction with H. Geiger, a method of detecting a single alpha particle and counting the number emitted from radium was devised.
Ernest Rutherford (271 words)
Ernest Rutherford (August 30, 1871 - October 19, 1937), called "father" of nuclear physics, pioneered the orbital theory of the atom notably in his discovery of rutherford scattering.
Rutherford was born at Brightwater, near Nelson, New Zealand.
In 1898 Rutherford was appointed to the chair of physics at McGill University where he did the work which gained him the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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