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Encyclopedia > Erich von Manstein
Erich von Manstein
24 November 1887(1887-11-24)9 June 1973 (aged 85)

Generalfeldmarschall Erich von Manstein
Place of birth Berlin, Germany
Place of death Irschenhausen, Germany
Allegiance German Empire (to 1918)
Weimar Republic (to 1933)
Nazi Germany
Federal Republic of Germany
Years of service 19061944
Rank Generalfeldmarschall
Commands held 18th Infantry Division

38th Corps
56th Panzer Corps
11th Army
Army Group Don
Army Group South is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Icking is a town in the district of Bad Tölz-Wolfratshausen in Bavaria in Germany. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... The Federal Republic of Germany can refer to two things: West Germany from 1949-1990 Germany since German reunification in 1990 ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Replica of the marshals baton of Generalfeldmarschall von Richthofen (Third Reich) Generalfeldmarschall ( ) (general field marshal, usually translated simply as field marshal, and sometimes written only as Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Austrian Empire. ... German 18th Infantry Division (September 1939 – November 1940) Redesignated German 18th Motorised Infantry Division (November 1940 – June 1943) Redesignated German 18th Panzergrenadier Division (June 1943 – May 1945) // German 18th Infantry Division Commander: Lieutenant-General Friedrich Karl Cranz 1 September 1939 - 1 November 1940 From September 1939 until May 1940 the... The German Eleventh Army (German: 11. ... Army Group Don was a German army group during World War II. Army Group Don was created in the southern sector of the Eastern Front on 22 November 1942. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ...

Battles/wars World War I

World War II
“The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Awards Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords
Relations Eduard von Lewinski
Other work Served as senior defence advisor to the West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer

Erich von Manstein (November 24, 1887June 9, 1973) served the German military as a lifelong professional soldier. He became one of the most prominent commanders of Nazi Germany's armed forces (Wehrmacht). During World War II he attained the rank of Field Marshal (Generalfeldmarschall) and was held in high esteem by his fellow officers as one of the Wehrmacht's best military minds. For the Soviet Unions military action against Poland under the same alliance, see Soviet invasion of Poland (1939). ... Belligerents France United Kingdom Canada Czechoslovakia Poland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) Leopold III H.G. Winkelman WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Sikorski Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H... Belligerents Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Franz Halder Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Ernst Busch Erich Hoepner Alfred Keller Georg von Küchler Günther von Kluge Heinz Guderian Hermann Hoth Albrecht Kesselring Adolf Strauss Carl-Heinrich von... Combatants Germany Romania Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Ivan Petrov Filipp Oktyabrskiy Strength 350,000+ 106,000 Casualties at least 100,000 killed, wounded or captured (Including Romanians) 95,000 captured, 11,000 killed The Battle of Sevastopol was fought from October 30, 1941 to July 4, 1942 between... Belligerents Germany Finland[1][2][3] Soviet Union Commanders Wilhelm von Leeb Georg von Küchler Carl Gustaf Mannerheim[4][5][6] Kliment Voroshilov Georgiy Zhukov Leonid Govorov Strength 725,000 930,000 Casualties and losses Wehrmacht (est. ... Belligerents Germany Romania Italy Hungary Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Friedrich Paulus # Erich von Manstein Wolfram von Richthofen Petre Dumitrescu Constantin Constantinescu Italo Gariboldi Gusztáv Vitéz Jány Viktor Pavičić Joseph Stalin Vasily Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilevsky Georgiy Zhukov Semyon Timoshenko Konstantin Rokossovsky Rodion Malinovsky Andrei Yeremenko... Combatants Red Army Germany Commanders Filipp Golikov Nikolay Vatutin Erich von Manstein †Theodor Eicke Strength 300,000 men 160,000 men Casualties Voronezh Front: Army of Popov: 3,000 KIA 11,000 WIA Southwestern Front: 20,000 KIA 90,000 WIA 9,000 POWs Final battles: 25,000 KIA 80... Belligerents Nazi Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Günther von Kluge Hermann Hoth Walther Model Hans Seidemann Robert Ritter von Greim Georgiy Zhukov Konstantin Rokossovskiy Nikolay Vatutin Ivan Konyev Strength 2,700 tanks 800,000 infantry 2,109 aircraft[1] 3,600 tanks 20,000 guns[2] 1... Combatants Axis Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Konstantin Rokossovsky, Ivan Konev Strength 1,250,000 men 12,600 guns 2,100 tanks 2,000 planes 2,650,000 men 51,000 guns 2,400 tanks 2,850 planes Casualties Low est. ... The penultimate expression of the award: the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with golden Oakleaves, Swords and Diamonds. ... Eduard Julius Ludwig von Lewinski (born 22 February 1829 in Münster Germany - died 17 September 1906 in Trebnitz, Prussia) was a Prussian general. ... For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Replica of the marshals baton of Generalfeldmarschall von Richthofen (Third Reich) Generalfeldmarschall ( ) (general field marshal, usually translated simply as field marshal, and sometimes written only as Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Austrian Empire. ...


He was the initiator and one of the planners of the Ardennes-offensive alternative in the invasion of France in 1940. He received acclaim from the Nazi-German leadership for the victorious battles of Perekop Isthmus, Kerch, Sevastopol and Kharkov. He commanded the failed relief effort at Stalingrad and the Cherkassy pocket evacuation. He was dismissed from service by Adolf Hitler in March 1944, due to his frequent clashes with Hitler over military strategy. Belligerents France United Kingdom Canada Czechoslovakia Poland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) Leopold III H.G. Winkelman WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Sikorski Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H... The Isthmus of Perekop is the narrow, three to four mile wide strip of land that connects the peninsula of Crimea to the rest of mainland Ukraine. ... Kerch (Ukrainian: , Russian: , Crimean Tatar: , Old East Slavic: Кърчевъ) is a city (2001 pop 157,000) on the Kerch Peninsula of eastern Crimea, is an important industrial, transport and tourist centre of Ukraine. ... Location Map of Ukraine with Sevastopol highlighted. ... Kharkov (rus: Ха́рьков) or Kharkiv (ukr: Ха́рків) is the second largest city in Ukraine, a center of Kharkivska oblast. It is situated in the northeast of the country and has a population of two million. ... Belligerents Germany Romania Italy Hungary Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Friedrich Paulus # Erich von Manstein Wolfram von Richthofen Petre Dumitrescu Constantin Constantinescu Italo Gariboldi Gusztáv Vitéz Jány Viktor Pavičić Joseph Stalin Vasily Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilevsky Georgiy Zhukov Semyon Timoshenko Konstantin Rokossovsky Rodion Malinovsky Andrei Yeremenko... Korsun Pocket, also known as the Cherkassy Pocket, was the name of the large pocket of German troops between the towns of Korsun and Cherkassy on the lower Dnepr River in the Southern Ukraine, during World War II. In January of 1944, the encroaching Soviet Red Army executed a pincer... Hitler redirects here. ...


In 1949, he was brought on trial in Hamburg for war crimes, which convicted him of "Neglecting to protect civilian lives" and for using scorched earth tactics denying vital food supplies to the local population. He was sentenced to 18 years in prison, which was later reduced to 12 years but only served 4 years before being released. Although claiming to not know about the Holocaust, von Manstein nevertheless showed a callous disregard for the plights of Jews, equating partisans and Jews and advocating harsh measures against both. After release from a British prison in 1953, he became a military advisor for the West German Government. Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... West Germany was the informal but almost universally used name for the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 until 1990, during which years the Federal Republic did not yet include East Germany. ...

Contents

Early life

Von Manstein was born Fritz Erich von Lewinski in Berlin, the tenth child of a Prussian aristocrat, artillery general Eduard von Lewinski (1829–1906), and Helene von Sperling (1847–1910). Hedwig von Sperling (1852–1925), Helene's younger sister, married Lieutenant General Georg von Manstein (1844–1913). The couple were not able to have children, so it was decided that this tenth, unborn child would be adopted by his uncle and aunt. When he was born, the Lewinskis sent a telegram to the von Mansteins which stated: You got a healthy boy today. Mother and child well. Congratulations. (von Manstein, E.: Soldat im 20. Jahrhundert, 5th Ed., 2002, p. 10). This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... Eduard Julius Ludwig von Lewinski (born 22 February 1829 in Münster Germany - died 17 September 1906 in Trebnitz, Prussia) was a Prussian general. ...


Not only were both Erich von Manstein's real and adopted father Prussian generals, but his mother's brother and both his grandfathers had also been Prussian generals (one of them leading a corps in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71). In addition, he was closely related to Paul von Hindenburg, the future Generalfeldmarschall and President of Germany. Thus, his career in the Prussian army was assured from birth. He attended the Lycée in Strasbourg (1894–99), a territory which had become part of the German Empire after the war of 1870–71. He spent six years in the cadet corps (1900–1906), in Plön and Groß-Lichterfelde and joined the Third Foot Guards Regiment (Garde zu Fuß) in March 1906 as an ensign. He was promoted to Lieutenant in January 1907, and in October 1913, entered the War Academy. Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with South German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III François Achille Bazaine Patrice de Mac-Mahon, duc de Magenta Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at wars beginning 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000... Paul Ludwig Hans Anton von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg, known universally as Paul von Hindenburg (2 October 1847 – 2 August 1934) was a German field marshal and statesman. ... In France, secondary education is divided into two schools: the collège (IPA: ) (somewhat comparable to U.S. junior high school) for the first four years directly following primary school; the lycée (IPA: ) (comparable to a U.S. high school) for the next three years. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Plön is a town in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ...


Middle years

World War

During World War I, von Manstein served on both the German Western Front (Belgium/France 1916: Attack on Verdun, 1917–18: Champagne) and the Eastern Front (1915: North Poland, 1915–16: Serbia, 1917: Estonia). In Poland, he was severely wounded in November 1914. He returned to duty in 1915, was promoted to captain and remained as a staff officer until the end of the war. In 1918, he volunteered for the staff position in the Frontier Defense Force in Breslau (Wroclaw) and served there until 1919. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Belgium British Empire Australia[1] Canada[2] India[3] Newfoundland[4] New Zealand[5] South Africa[6] United Kingdom France and French Overseas Empire Portugal[7] United States Germany Commanders No unified command until 1918, then Ferdinand Foch Moltke → Falkenhayn → Hindenburg and Ludendorff → Hindenburg and Groener Casualties ~4,800... Belligerents France German Empire Commanders Philippe Pétain Robert Nivelle Erich von Falkenhayn Crown Prince Wilhelm Strength About 30,000 on 21 February 1916 About 150,000 on 21 February 1916 Casualties and losses 378,000; of whom 163,000 died 330,000; of whom 143,000 died The Battle... Location of the Champagne province in France Champagne is one of the most traditional provinces of France, a region of France that is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the regions name. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... Wrocław. ...


Inter-war era

Von Manstein married Jutta Sibylle von Loesch, the daughter of a Silesian landowner in 1920. She died in 1966. They had three children: a daughter named Gisela, and two sons, Gero (b. December 31, 1922) and Rüdiger. Their elder son Gero died on the battlefield in the northern sector of the Eastern Front on October 29, 1942. Silesia (English pronunciation [], Czech: ; German: ; Latin: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlůnsk) is a historical region in central Europe, located along the upper and middle Oder River, upper Vistula River, and along the Sudetes, Carpathian (Silesian Beskids) mountain range. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Von Manstein stayed in the military after the war. In the 1920s, he took part in the creation of the Reichswehr, the German Army of the Weimar Republic (restricted to 100,000 men by the Versailles Treaty). He was appointed company commander in 1920, and later battalion commander in 1922. In 1927, he was promoted to Major, and began serving with the General Staff, visiting other countries to learn about their military. In 1933, the Nazi party rose to power in Germany, ending the Weimar era. The new regime renounced the Versailles Treaty and proceeded with large scale rearmament and expansion of the military. Reichswehr flag (1921-1935). ... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... Not to be confused with Nasi. ...


On July 1, 1935, von Manstein was made the Head of Operations Branch of the Army General Staff (Generalstab des Heeres), part of the Army High Command (OKH). During his tenure, he proposed the development of Sturmgeschütz, self-propelled assault guns that would provide heavy direct-fire support to infantry, relieving the mobile tank forces of this responsibility. In World War II, the resulting StuG series would prove to be one of the most successful and cost-effective German weapons. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... The Oberkommando des Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... The Oberkommando des Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... Sturmgeschütz is a German word for assault gun, abbreviated StuG. They were widely as fire support to infantry, panzer and panzergrenadier units. ...


He was promoted on October 1, 1936, becoming the Deputy Chief of Staff (Oberquartiermeister I) to the Chief of the Army General Staff, General Ludwig Beck. Von Manstein initially supported Beck in resisting the political influence of the Nazi Party in the army, at one point going so far as to issue a memorandum calling for an end to racial indoctrination in the army, but he soon changed tack. Later, von Manstein maintained that the OKH should refrain from interceding in political matters and even in matters of higher strategy, claiming that these matters were Hitler's responsibility. The General Staff's task, he argued, was to produce the operational planning necessary to realize Hitler's goals and no more. Beck was inevitably distressed by this and severed relations with von Manstein, dismissing him as "not a man of bad character, but a man of no character at all". On February 4, 1938, von Manstein was appointed commander of the 18th Infantry Division in Liegnitz, Silesia with the rank of Generalleutnant. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ludwig Beck General Ludwig Beck (June 29, 1880 – July 21, 1944) was Chief of Staff of the German Armed forces during the early years of the Nazi regime in Germany before World War II. Born in Biebrich in Hesse-Nassau, he was educated in the conservative Prussian military tradition. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... German 18th Infantry Division (September 1939 – November 1940) Redesignated German 18th Motorised Infantry Division (November 1940 – June 1943) Redesignated German 18th Panzergrenadier Division (June 1943 – May 1945) // German 18th Infantry Division Commander: Lieutenant-General Friedrich Karl Cranz 1 September 1939 - 1 November 1940 From September 1939 until May 1940 the... Legnica (pronounce: [lεgniʦa], formerly Lignica, German Liegnitz) is a town in south-western Poland, with 108,000 inhabitants (1995). ... Silesia (English pronunciation [], Czech: ; German: ; Latin: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlůnsk) is a historical region in central Europe, located along the upper and middle Oder River, upper Vistula River, and along the Sudetes, Carpathian (Silesian Beskids) mountain range. ... -1...


World War II

Poland

Main article: Fall Weiß (1939)

On August 18, 1939, in preparation for Operation Fall Weiß, the German invasion of Poland, von Manstein was appointed Chief of Staff to Gerd von Rundstedt’s Army Group South. Here he worked along with von Rundstedt’s Chief of Operations, Colonel Günther Blumentritt in the development of the operational plan. Von Rundstedt accepted von Manstein’s plan calling for the concentration of the majority of the army group’s armored units into Walther von Reichenau’s 10th Army, with the objective of a decisive breakthrough which would lead to the encirclement of Polish forces west of the Vistula River. In von Manstein’s plan, two other armies comprising Army Group South, Wilhelm List’s 14th Army and Johannes Blaskowitz’s 8th Army, were to provide the flank support for Reichenau’s armored thrust towards Warsaw, the Polish capital. Privately, von Manstein was lukewarm about the Polish campaign, thinking that it would be better to keep Poland as a buffer between Germany and the Soviet Union. He also worried about an Allied attack on the West Wall once the Polish campaign started, thus drawing Germany into a two-front war. Fall Weiss (Case White, German spelling Fall Weiß) was a German strategic plan for a war with Poland prepared before 1939 and put into action on 1 September 1939. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For the Soviet Unions military action against Poland under the same alliance, see Soviet invasion of Poland (1939). ... Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt (December 12, 1875 - February 24, 1953) was a Generalfeldmarschall of the German Army during World War II. He held some of the highest field commands in all phases of the war. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Günther Blumentritt (February 10, 1897-October 12, 1967) was a German general. ... Walther von Reichenau (August 16, 1884 - January 17, 1942), German military commander, was the son of a Prussian general and joined the German Army in 1902. ... The German Tenth Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... Vistula river basin Vistula (Polish Wisła), is the longest river in Poland. ... Wilhelm List (Siegmund Wilhelm von List) (May 14, 1880 - August 17, 1971), was a German Field Marshal during World War II. He entered the Army in 1898 and served as a staff officer in the First World War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Bunker on the Siegfried line The original Siegfried line was a line of defensive forts and tank defences built by Germany along their border with France in 1916-1917 during World War I. However, in English, Siegfried line more commonly refers to the similar World War II defensive line, built...


Launched on September 1, 1939, the invasion began successfully. In Army Group South’s area of responsibility, armored units of the 10th Army pursued the retreating Poles, giving them no time to set up a defense. The 8th Army prevented the isolated Polish troop concentrations in Łódź, Radom and Poznań from merging into a cohesive force. Deviating from the original plan that called for heading straight for the Vistula and then proceeding to Warsaw, von Manstein persuaded von Rundstedt to encircle the Polish units in the Radom area. The plan succeeded, clearing the bulk of Polish resistance from the southern approach to Warsaw. is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Ex navicula navis (From a boat, a ship) Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina Łódź City Rights 1423 Government  - Mayor Jerzy Kropiwnicki Area  - City 293. ... Radom (pronounce: [radÉ”m]) is a city in central Poland with 227 309 inhabitants. ... Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina PoznaÅ„ Established 8th century City Rights 1253 Government  - Mayor Ryszard Grobelny Area  - City 261. ... Radom (pronounce: [radÉ”m]) is a city in central Poland with 227 309 inhabitants. ...


France

Main article: Battle of France

On September 27, 1939, Warsaw formally surrendered, although isolated pockets of resistance remained. That same day, Hitler ordered the Army High Command, led by General Franz Halder, to develop a plan for action in the west against France and the Low Countries. The different plans that the General Staff suggested were given to von Manstein and Gerd von Rundstedt and together they formalised an alternative plan for Fall Gelb (Case Yellow). This plan received Hitler's attention in February 1940 and finally his agreement. Belligerents France United Kingdom Canada Czechoslovakia Poland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) Leopold III H.G. Winkelman Władysław Sikorski Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franz Halder Franz Ritter Halder (June 30, 1884 – April 2, 1972) was a German General and the head of the Army General Staff from 1938 until September 1942, when he was dismissed after frequent disagreements with Adolf Hitler. ... For information about the confusion between the Low Countries and the Netherlands, see Netherlands (terminology). ... Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt (December 12, 1875 - February 24, 1953) was a Generalfeldmarschall of the German Army during World War II. He held some of the highest field commands in all phases of the war. ... Belligerents France United Kingdom Canada Czechoslovakia Poland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) Leopold III H.G. Winkelman Władysław Sikorski Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H...


By late October, the bulk of the German Army was redeployed to the west. Von Manstein was made Chief of Staff of von Rundstedt’s Army Group A in western Germany. Like many of the army's younger officers, von Manstein opposed Fall Gelb, criticizing it for its lack of ability to deliver strategic results and the uninspired utilization of the armored forces, which may have come from OKH's inability to influence Hitler's planning. Von Manstein pointed out that a repeat of the Schlieffen Plan, with the attack directed through Belgium, was something the Allies expected, as they were already moving strong forces into the area. Bad weather in the area caused the attack to be cancelled several times and eventually delayed into the spring. Army Group A was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. // During the German invasion of the Low Countries and France Army Group A was under the command of General Gerd von Rundstedt, and was responsible for the break-out through the Ardennes. ... Belligerents France United Kingdom Canada Czechoslovakia Poland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) Leopold III H.G. Winkelman WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Sikorski Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H... Alfred Graf von Schlieffen For the French counter-plan, see Plan XVII The Schlieffen Plan was the German General Staffs early 20th century overall strategic plan for victory both on the Western Front against France and against Russia in the east, taking advantage of expected differences in the three...


During the autumn, Von Manstein, with the informal cooperation of Heinz Guderian, developed his own plan; he suggested that the panzer divisions attack through the wooded hills of the Ardennes where no one would expect them, then establish bridgeheads on the Meuse River and rapidly drive to the English Channel. The Germans would thus cut off the French and Allied armies in Belgium and Flanders. Von Manstein's proposal also contained a second thrust, outflanking the Maginot Line, which would have allowed the Germans to force any future defensive line much further south. This second thrust would perhaps have avoided the need for the Fall Rot second stage of the Battle of France (Von Manstein, 2004). The plan was after the event nicknamed Sichelschnitt (sickle cut). This article is about the World War II general Heinz Guderian. ... The Ardennes (IPA pronunciation: ) (Dutch: Ardennen) is a volcanic region of extensive forests and rolling hill country, primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into France (lending its name to the Ardennes département and the Champagne-Ardenne région). ... The Meuse (Maas) at Maastricht Meuse near Grave The Meuse (Dutch & German Maas) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... The Maginot Line (IPA: [maʒinoː], named after French minister of defense André Maginot) was a line of concrete fortifications, tank obstacles, artillery casemates, machine gun posts, and other defenses, which France constructed along its borders with Germany and Italy, in the light of experience from World War I... In World War II, Battle of France was the German invasion of France and the Low Countries, executed 10 May 1940 which ended the Phony War. ...


Oberkommando der Wehrmacht originally rejected the proposal. Halder had von Manstein removed from von Rundstedt's headquarters and sent to the east to command the 38th Army Corps. But Hitler, looking for a more aggressive plan, approved a modified version of von Manstein's ideas, which today is known as the Manstein Plan. This modified version, formulated by Halder, did not contain the second thrust. Von Manstein and his corps played a minor role during the operations in France, serving under Günther von Kluge's 4th Army. However, it was his corps which helped to achieve the first breakthrough during Fall Rot, east of Amiens, and was the first to reach and cross the River Seine. The invasion was an outstanding military success and von Manstein was promoted to full general and awarded the Knight's Cross for suggesting the plan. The command flag for the Chief of the High Command of the German Armed Forces (1938 - 1941) The command flag for a Generalfeldmarschall as the Chief of the High Command of the German Armed Forces (1941 - 1945) The Oberkommando der Wehrmacht or OKW (Wehrmacht High Command, Armed Forces High Command... Early plans for Fall Gelb; below left the original Manstein Plan as first presented to the OKH. Note that the small attacks to the south were to be carried out simultaneously to the main effort, not as a second phase operation and that only a limited number of armoured divisions... Günther “Hans” von Kluge (October 30, 1882 – August 19, 1944), was a German military leader. ... Insignia of 4th Army The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... This article is about the river in France; it should not be confused with the Senne, a much smaller river that flows through Brussels. ... -1... The Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) is a military decoration of Germany which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813. ...


Barbarossa

Main article: Operation Barbarossa

In February 1941, von Manstein was appointed commander of the 56th Panzer Corps. He became involved in Operation Barbarossa, serving under General Erich Hoepner. Attacking on June 22, 1941, von Manstein advanced more than 100 miles in only two days and seized two vital bridges over the Dvina River at Dvinsk. Belligerents Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Franz Halder Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Ernst Busch Erich Hoepner Alfred Keller Georg von Küchler Günther von Kluge Heinz Guderian Hermann Hoth Albrecht Kesselring Adolf Strauss Carl-Heinrich von... Belligerents Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Franz Halder Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Ernst Busch Erich Hoepner Alfred Keller Georg von Küchler Günther von Kluge Heinz Guderian Hermann Hoth Albrecht Kesselring Adolf Strauss Carl-Heinrich von... Erich Hoepner Erich Hoepner (September 14, 1886 - August 8, 1944) was a German general in World War II. Hoepner was born in Frankfurt an der Oder, Germany and served in the German Army during World War I. He remained in the army in the post-war years and reached the... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Two rivers are referred to as Dvina: Western Dvina (also known as Daugava) Northern Dvina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Daugavpils (Belarusian Дзьвінск Dźvinsk, Russian Двинcк Dvinsk, Lithuanian Daugpilis, German Dünaburg, Polish Dzwinow or Dźwińsk, Yiddish דענענבורג Denenburg), population 115,265 in 2000 census) is the second largest city in Latvia. ...


Crimea and the Battle of Sevastopol

Main article: Battle of Sevastopol

In September 1941, von Manstein was appointed commander of the 11th Army. Its previous commander, Colonel-General Eugen Ritter von Schobert, had perished when his plane landed in a Russian minefield. The 11th Army was tasked with invading the Crimea, capturing Sevastopol and pursuing enemy forces on the flank of Army Group South during its advance into Russia [Von Manstein, (2004)]. Combatants Germany Romania Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Ivan Petrov Filipp Oktyabrskiy Strength 350,000+ 106,000 Casualties at least 100,000 killed, wounded or captured (Including Romanians) 95,000 captured, 11,000 killed The Battle of Sevastopol was fought from October 30, 1941 to July 4, 1942 between... The German Eleventh Army (German: 11. ... Eugen Ritter von Schobert was a German general who served in World War I and World War II. He was born Eugen Schobert (the Ritter von was due to his later receipt of Bavarias highest military honor) on March 13, 1883 in Würzburg, in the Kingdom of Bavaria... Motto: ÐŸÑ€Ð¾Ñ†Ð²ÐµÑ‚ание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem: ÐÐ¸Ð²Ñ‹ и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... Location Map of Ukraine with Sevastopol highlighted. ...


After the initial German breakthrough, the rest of the Perekop area had to be secured. After ten days of fighting, the Soviet line was overrun on 28 October. The Germans quickly seized control over the whole peninsula, and by 17 November, only the city of Sevastopol held out. is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Location Map of Ukraine with Sevastopol highlighted. ...


The attack on Sevastopol began October 30, 1941 but failed and on December 21, just as the Germans were preparing for their last push, the Soviets launched a spoiling attack, forcing them back. Shortly thereafter the Soviet winter offensive began, producing the Wehrmacht's so-called "Winter Crisis." is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Just over a week later, on December 26, 1941, the Soviets landed on the Kerch straits, and on December 30, executed another landing near Theodosia. Only a hurried withdrawal from the Kerch straits, in contravention of Manstein's orders, by 46 Infantry Division under General Hans Graf von Sponecks command prevented a collapse of the eastern part of the Crimea, although the division lost most of its heavy equipment. This situation forced von Manstein to cancel a resumption of the attack on Sevastopol and send most of his forces east to destroy the Soviet bridgehead. The situation was stabilised by late April 1942. is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Kerch Strait. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Theodosia (Russian: Феодосия; Ukrainian: Феодосія; Greek: Θεοδωσία; Crimean Tatar/Turkish: Kefe) is a port and resort city in southern Ukraine, located on the Black Sea coast of Crimea at coordinates 45. ... Hans Graf von Sponeck or Hans Emil Otto Graf Sponeck (January 12, 1888 - July 23, 1944) was a German general (General-Leutnant) during World War II who was imprisoned for disobeying orders and later executed. ...


Operation Trappenjagd, launched on May 8, 1942, aimed at expelling the Russian forces from the Kerch peninsula. After feinting against the north, the 11th army attacked south, and the Soviets were soon reduced to fleeing for the Kerch straits. The operation was completed successfully on 18 May. Battle of the Kerch Peninsula (German: ) was a World War II offensive by German and Romanian armies against Soviet forces defending the Kerch Peninsula, in the eastern part of the Crimea. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


With months delay von Manstein turned his attention once more towards the capture of Sevastopol, a battle in which Germany would use some of the largest guns ever built. Along with large numbers of regular artillery pieces, super-heavy 600mm mortars and the 800mm "Dora" railway gun were brought in for the assault. The furious barrage began on the morning of June 7, 1942, and all of the resources of the Luftwaffe's Luftflotte 4, commanded by Wolfram von Richthofen, descended on their targets, continuing for five days before the main assault began. Preparing to fire the gun Schwerer Gustav and Dora were the names under which the German 80 cm K (E) railway guns were known. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (German IPA: ) is a generic German term for an air force. ... Generalfeldmarschall Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen (10 October 1895 - 12 July 1945) was a German fighter ace during World War I and a general and field marshal of the Luftwaffe during World War II. Von Richthofen was a distant cousin of the German World War I flying ace Manfred von Richthofen...


The outer defensive rings were breached by June 16, 1942, and on July 4, 1942 Sevastopol fell. Hitler, delighted at hearing the good news, phoned von Manstein and commended him as "The Conqueror of Sevastopol", informing him that he had ordered von Manstein's promotion to Generalfeldmarschall. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Replica of the marshals baton of Generalfeldmarschall von Richthofen (Third Reich) Generalfeldmarschall ( ) (general field marshal, usually translated simply as field marshal, and sometimes written only as Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Austrian Empire. ...


Leningrad

Main article: Siege of Leningrad

After the capture of Sevastopol the German high command felt that any city could be taken with a determined enough attack,[citation needed] and von Manstein was seen as the right man to finally break Leningrad, which had been under siege from autumn the previous year. Von Manstein, with elements of the 11th Army, was transferred to the Leningrad front to lead Operation Nordlicht, which was hoped to be the final capture of the city, set to launch on September 15, 1942. Hitler was confident that with considerable amounts of artillery and the new Tiger tank this operation would finally break the determined Soviet defense; von Manstein, on the other hand, was more pessimistic, arguing that a simultaneous attack in the north by the Finns would be needed. Belligerents Germany Finland[1][2][3] Soviet Union Commanders Wilhelm von Leeb Georg von Küchler Carl Gustaf Mannerheim[4][5][6] Kliment Voroshilov Georgiy Zhukov Leonid Govorov Strength 725,000 930,000 Casualties and losses Wehrmacht (est. ... Leningrad (Russian: Ленинград) may mean: St. ... Leningrad (Russian: Ленинград) may mean: St. ... Combatants Germany Spanish Blue Division Soviet Union Commanders Wilhelm von Leeb Georg von Küchler Agustín Muñoz Grandes Kliment Voroshilov Georgiy Zhukov Strength 725,000 930,000 Casualties Unknown Red Army: 332,059 KIA 24,324 non-combat dead 111,142 missing 16,470 civilians 1 million civilians... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... First Tiger I tank captured near Tunis The Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf. ...


On August 27, 1942 the Soviets launched a spoiling attack against Georg Lindemann’s 18th Army in the narrow German salient west of Lake Ladoga. Von Manstein was forced to divert his forces in order to avoid catastrophe. A series of bitter battles ensued, in which von Manstein's smaller forces managed to outmaneuver the larger Soviet forces, which lost over 60,000 men over the course of the next few months. This meant, however, that the Germans were not able to execute a decisive assault on Leningrad, and the siege continued into 1943. is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Georg Lindemann (1884 - 1963) was a German cavalry officer and field commander who served in the Heer during The Great War and World War II. He survived the Second World War and after several years incarceration, was released. ... The German Eighteenth Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... Map of lake Ladoga Towpath Bridge between Lake Ladoga and Lake Onega (from a photograph taken ca. ...


Stalingrad

Main article: Battle of Stalingrad
On February 17, 1943, under heavy security, Hitler flew in to Army Group South's headquarters at Zaporozh'ye, Ukraine; just 30 miles away from the front-line. Seen here, Generalfeldmarschall von Manstein is greeting Hitler on the local airfield; on the right are Hans Baur and the Luftwaffe Generalfeldmarschall Wolfram von Richthofen

On November 21, 1942, during the Battle of Stalingrad, Adolf Hitler appointed von Manstein commander of the newly-created Army Group Don (Heeresgruppe Don), consisting of a hastily assembled group of tired men and machines, and ordered him to lead Operation Wintergewitter (Winter Storm), the rescue effort by Hermann Hoth's 4th Panzer Army and auxiliary Romanian troops to relieve the 6th Army of Friedrich Paulus trapped inside Stalingrad. Wintergewitter, launched on December 12, achieved some initial success and von Manstein got his three panzer divisions and supporting units of the 57th Panzer Corps(comprising the 23rd Panzer Grenadier Division, and the 6th and 17th Panzer Divisions) within 30 miles of Stalingrad by December 20. However, the corps was halted at the River Aksay, and strong Russian forces eventually pushed them back. Belligerents Germany Romania Italy Hungary Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Friedrich Paulus # Erich von Manstein Wolfram von Richthofen Petre Dumitrescu Constantin Constantinescu Italo Gariboldi Gusztáv Vitéz Jány Viktor Pavičić Joseph Stalin Vasily Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilevsky Georgiy Zhukov Semyon Timoshenko Konstantin Rokossovsky Rodion Malinovsky Andrei Yeremenko... On February 17, 1943, under heavy security, Hitler made a uncommon front-line visit to von Manstein’s headquarters at Zaporozhye, Ukraine. ... On February 17, 1943, under heavy security, Hitler made a uncommon front-line visit to von Manstein’s headquarters at Zaporozhye, Ukraine. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Zaporizhzhia (Ukrainian: Запоріжжя, Russian: Запорожье, Zaporozhye) is a city in south-eastern Ukraine, the capital of Zaporizka oblast. It lies on the banks of the Dnieper river. ... Hans Baur (June 19, 1897 – February 17, 1993) was Hitlers pilot during his political campaigns of the 1920s and 1930s, later his personal pilot and leader of the Reichsregierung squadron. ... Generalfeldmarschall Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen (10 October 1895 - 12 July 1945) was a German fighter ace during World War I and a general and field marshal of the Luftwaffe during World War II. Von Richthofen was a distant cousin of the German World War I flying ace Manfred von Richthofen... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Belligerents Germany Romania Italy Hungary Croatia Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Friedrich Paulus # Erich von Manstein Wolfram von Richthofen Petre Dumitrescu Constantin Constantinescu Italo Gariboldi Gusztáv Vitéz Jány Viktor Pavičić Joseph Stalin Vasily Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilevsky Georgiy Zhukov Semyon Timoshenko Konstantin Rokossovsky Rodion Malinovsky Andrei Yeremenko... Army Group Don was a German army group during World War II. Army Group Don was created in the southern sector of the Eastern Front on 22 November 1942. ... Operation Winter Storm (German Unternehmen Wintergewitter) was the German Fourth Panzer Armys attempt to relieve the German Sixth Army from encirclement during the Battle of Stalingrad during World War II. The operation commenced on 12 December 1942 and was able to advance just halfway to its objective before a... General Hermann Hoth Hermann Papa Hoth (12 April 1885 - 26 January 1971) was a general of the Third Reich during World War II, notable for victories in France and on the Eastern Front, and later, after serving six years in prison for war crimes, as a writer on military history. ... Panzergruppe 4 4. ... The 6. ... Friedrich Paulus. ... Stalingrad is the former name of two cities: Volgograd, Russia Karviná-Nové Město, near Ostrava, Czech Republic Other uses: The Battle of Stalingrad (a major turning-point of World War II and arguably the bloodiest battle in human history) Stalingrad (German film set during the above battle) Stalingrad (metro station... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1st Light Brigade 1st Light Division 6th Panzer Division The German 1st Light Brigade was a mechanized unit established in October 1937 in imitation of the French Division Légère Mécanique, intended to take on the roles of army-level reconnaissance and security that had traditionally been the... 17th Panzer Division was formed on November 1940 from 27th Infantry Division. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Coat of arms of Aksay Aksay (Russian: ) is a town in Rostov Oblast, Russia, located on the right bank of the Don River, 18 km north-east of Rostov-on-Don. ...


At this point, von Manstein recommended Paulus to break out of the city, despite Hitlers refusal to allow a break out attempt. Erich von Manstein did however not dare to give the break out order himself, even though he could have, since he was Paulus superior.[1] It is doubtful that the 6th Army had the strength to launch the offensive operations needed to break through the Soviet lines. The 6th Army was short of fuel for its tanks and trucks, and short of food for its soldiers. Some argue the defeat at Stalingrad was due to a mistaken decision by Hitler to refuse the 6th Army permission to break out. However, the Red Army had to devote a number of their own armies in order to contain the 6th Army—forces that otherwise would probably have been used to devastating effect at other points of the weakened German front. It remains debatable whether the fate of 6th Army was more beneficial or detrimental to the Eastern Front on a strategic level. Friedrich Paulus. ...


Operation Saturn, a massive Red Army offensive in the southernmost part of the front, aimed at capturing Rostov and thus cutting off the German Army Group A, which was still withdrawing from the Caucasus, forced von Manstein to divert his forces to help hard-pressed Army Group A, in its retreat to Ukraine, thus avoiding the collapse of the entire front. The attack also prevented the 48th Panzer Corps (comprising the 336th Infantry Division, the 3rd Luftwaffe Field Division, and the 11th Panzer Division), under the command of General Otto von Knobelsdorff, from joining up with the 57th Panzer Corps as planned. Instead, the 48th Panzer Corps held a line along the River Chir, beating off successive Russian attacks. General Hermann Balck used the 11th Panzer Division to counterattack Russian salients. But the Romanian, Italian, and Hungarian armies on the flanks were overwhelmed, and the 48th Panzer Corps was forced to retreat. As a result, the remnants of the 4th Panzer Army retreated, as its northern flank was exposed by the loss of the Don. Soviet advances during Operations Uranus, Mars and Saturn. ... For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ... Central market and Church in Rostov. ... Army Group A was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. // During the German invasion of the Low Countries and France Army Group A was under the command of General Gerd von Rundstedt, and was responsible for the break-out through the Ardennes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... Army Group A was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. // During the German invasion of the Low Countries and France Army Group A was under the command of General Gerd von Rundstedt, and was responsible for the break-out through the Ardennes. ... The 11. ... Otto von Knobelsdorff (1886-1966), was a German general of the Panzer troops, serving during World War II. Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords Knights Cross (17 September 1941) 322. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Kharkov Operation

By early February, the German forces began to regroup. Von Manstein's Army Group Don combined with Army Group B and was made into the new Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd), which was led by von Manstein. On February 21, 1943, he launched a counteroffensive into the overextended Soviet flank. The assault proved a major success; von Manstein's troops advanced rapidly, isolating Soviet forward units and forcing the Red Army to halt most of its offensive operations. By March 2, tank spearheads from Hoth's 4th Panzer Army and Army Detachment Kempf met, cutting off large portions of the Soviet Southwest Front, and by March 9, the Wehrmacht had inflicted a heavy defeat on the Soviets at Krasnograd and Barvenkovo. An estimated 23,000 Soviet soldiers were killed and a further 9,000 were captured. Additionally, 615 Soviet tanks and 354 guns were captured.[citation needed] Combatants Red Army Germany Commanders Filipp Golikov Nikolay Vatutin Erich von Manstein †Theodor Eicke Strength 300,000 men 160,000 men Casualties Voronezh Front: Army of Popov: 3,000 KIA 11,000 WIA Southwestern Front: 20,000 KIA 90,000 WIA 9,000 POWs Final battles: 25,000 KIA 80... Army Group Don was a German army group during World War II. Army Group Don was created in the southern sector of the Eastern Front on 22 November 1942. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Krasnograd is a town in Ukraine. ...


Von Manstein then pushed forward, his effort spearheaded by Paul Hausser's 2nd SS Panzer Corps, recapturing Kharkov on March 14, after bloody street-fighting in what is known as the Third Battle of Kharkov. In recognition for this accomplishment, von Manstein received the Oak Leaves for the Knight's Cross. The 2nd SS Panzer Corps then captured Belgorod on March 21. Von Manstein proposed a daring action for the summer nicknamed the "backhand blow", which was intended to outflank the Red Army into the Sea of Azov at Rostov, but Hitler instead chose the more conventional Operation Citadel aimed at crushing the Kursk salient. Paul Papa Hausser (October 7, 1880 - December 21, 1972) was an officer in the German Army, achieving the high rank of Lieutenant General in the inter-war Reichswehr, after retirement from regular Army he became the father (thus the nickname “Papa”) of the Waffen-SS and one of its most... The II.SS-Panzerkorps was a German Waffen-SS armoured corps which saw action on both the Eastern and Western Fronts during World War II. // Formation - Kharkov The II.SS-Panzerkorps was formed in July 1942 in Bergen in The Netherlands as SS-Panzer-Generalkommando. ... Kharkov (rus: Ха́рьков) or Kharkiv (ukr: Ха́рків) is the second largest city in Ukraine, a center of Kharkivska oblast. It is situated in the northeast of the country and has a population of two million. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Red Army Germany Commanders Filipp Golikov Nikolay Vatutin Erich von Manstein †Theodor Eicke Strength 300,000 men 160,000 men Casualties Voronezh Front: Army of Popov: 3,000 KIA 11,000 WIA Southwestern Front: 20,000 KIA 90,000 WIA 9,000 POWs Final battles: 25,000 KIA 80... The II.SS-Panzerkorps was a German Waffen-SS armoured corps which saw action on both the Eastern and Western Fronts during World War II. // Formation - Kharkov The II.SS-Panzerkorps was formed in July 1942 in Bergen in The Netherlands as SS-Panzer-Generalkommando. ... Coat of arms of Belgorod Belgorod (Russian: ) is a city in Western Russia, situated on the Severny Donets river just 40 km north from the Ukrainian border, at 50°37′N 36°35′E. It is the administrative center of Belgorod Oblast. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The shallow Sea of Azov is clearly distinguished from the deeper Black Sea. ... Central market and Church in Rostov. ... Battle of Kursk Conflict World War II Date July 4, 1943 - July 22, 1943 Place Kursk, USSR Result Indecisive The Battle of Kursk was a significant battle on the Eastern Front of World War II. It remains the largest armored engagement of all time, and included the most costly single... Kursk (Russian: ; pronunciation: koorsk; IPA: ) is a city in the western part of Central Russia, at the confluence of Kur, Tuskar, and Seym rivers. ...


Citadel

Main article: Battle of Kursk

During Operation Citadel, von Manstein led the southern pincer, and despite losses, he managed to achieve most of his initial goals, inflicting far more casualties than he sustained. In his memoirs, Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who led the Soviet defense at Kursk, praised von Manstein. But due to the almost complete failure of the northern sector's pincer led by Günther von Kluge and Walther Model, chronic lack of infantry support and an operational reserve, as well as Operation Husky, the Allied invasion of Sicily, Hitler called off the offensive. Von Manstein protested, asserting that the victory was almost at hand as he felt he had achieved local superiority, and that with a little more effort, he could crack the Soviet defenses before they could bring up their reserves. After the failure of Citadel, the Soviets launched a massive counterattack against the exhausted German forces. Belligerents Nazi Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Günther von Kluge Hermann Hoth Walther Model Hans Seidemann Robert Ritter von Greim Georgiy Zhukov Konstantin Rokossovskiy Nikolay Vatutin Ivan Konyev Strength 2,700 tanks 800,000 infantry 2,109 aircraft[1] 3,600 tanks 20,000 guns[2] 1... Marshal of the Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov, GCB (Russian: ) (December 1, 1896 [O.S. November 19]–June 18, 1974), was a Soviet military commander who, in the course of World War II, led the Red Army to liberate the Soviet Union from the Nazi occupation, to overrun... Günther “Hans” von Kluge (October 30, 1882 – August 19, 1944), was a German military leader. ... Otto Moritz Walter Model (IPA /mo:dÉ™l/) (January 24, 1891–April 21, 1945) was a German general, and later a Field Marshal, during World War II. He was noted for his defensive skills, and was nicknamed Hitlers fireman. Model served as an infantry officer in World War I... Husky was also the codename of Australian military support to Sierra Leone ending in February 2003. ...


A German victory in the sense of annihilating the surrounded Soviet forces required both the completion of the encirclement (that is the linking of the northern and southern German pincers) and holding the encirclement long enough to overcome the encircled Soviet forces. Even if the first had been accomplished it does not follow that the second would automatically follow. The German forces post-Stalingrad were never able to force the Soviets into significant retreats, except for temporary reversals like Kharkov. After halting the German offensive at Kursk, the Soviets had enough strength to launch immediate counterattacks.


Dnieper Campaign

Main article: Battle of the Dnieper

In September 1943, von Manstein withdrew to the west bank of the river Dnieper, inflicting heavy casualties on the Red Army[citation needed]. From October to mid-January of 1944, von Manstein stabilized the situation on the South Front. However, The Soviets established a salient from Kiev, and were within reach of the crucial town of Zhitomir. The Germans launched a successful counteroffensive, in which 1st SS Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler and 2nd SS Division Das Reich, together with 1st, 7th, 19th, and 25th Panzer Divisions and 68th Infantry Division (part of 4th Panzer Army), wheeled around the flank of the Russians in front of Zhitomir. Several notable victories were won, at Brussilov, Radomyshl, and Meleni, under the guidance of General Hermann Balck; but due to the lackluster judgment of Colonel General Rauss,[citation needed] the new commander of 4th Panzer Army, the Kiev salient could not be eliminated. In late January 1944, von Manstein was forced to retreat further westwards by the Soviet offensive. In mid-February 1944, he disobeyed Hitler's order and ordered 11th and 42nd Corps (consisting of 56,000 men in six divisions) of Army Group South to break out from the "Korsun Pocket", which occurred on February 16February 17, 1944. Eventually, Hitler accepted this action and ordered the breakout after it had already taken place. Combatants Axis Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Konstantin Rokossovsky, Ivan Konev Strength 1,250,000 men 12,600 guns 2,100 tanks 2,000 planes 2,650,000 men 51,000 guns 2,400 tanks 2,850 planes Casualties Low est. ... This article is about the river. ... For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Zhytomyrs’ka oblast’ (Житомирська область in Ukrainian; Żytomierzczyna in Polish) is an oblast (province) of northern Ukraine. ... The Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler (German for Adolf Hitlers Bodyguard Regiment) was a unit of the SS. It was a Waffen SS security and combat formation which saw action on both the Eastern and Western fronts during World War II. As its name suggested, the Leibstandarte started life in... SS-Division Verfügungstruppe SS-Division Deutschland SS-Division Reich SS-Division Das Reich 2. ... The German 1st Panzer Division () was an armored division in the German Army during World War II. Its divisional insignia was a white oakleaf emblem. ... The 7th Panzer Division, which participated in the Battle of France, was nicknamed the Ghost Division because nobody knew where they were attacking from, not even the German High Command. ... The German 19th Panzer Division was created from the 19th Infantry Division and was formed on 1 November 1940. ... The 25th Panzer Division was a german tank unit during World War II. It was one of the many understrenghtened Panzer Divisions the germans formed during the last years of the war. ... Panzergruppe 4 4. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Korsun Pocket, also known as the Cherkassy Pocket, was the name of the large pocket of German troops between the towns of Korsun and Cherkassy on the lower Dnepr River in the Southern Ukraine, during World War II. In January of 1944, the encroaching Soviet Red Army executed a pincer... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Dismissal

Von Manstein continued to argue with Hitler about overall strategy on the Eastern Front. Von Manstein advocated an elastic, mobile defense. He was prepared to cede territory, attempting to make the Soviet forces either stretch out too thinly or to make them advance too fast so that they could be attacked on the flanks with the goal of encircling them. Hitler ignored Manstein's advice and continued to insist on static warfare. Because of these frequent disagreements, von Manstein publicly advocated that Hitler relinquish control and leave the management of the war to professionals, starting with the establishment of the position of commander-in-chief in the East (Oberbefehlshaber Ost). Hitler, however, rejected this idea numerous times, fearing that it would weaken his hold on power.


This argument also alarmed some of Hitler's closest henchmen, such as Göring and the SS chief Himmler, who were not prepared to give up any of their powers. Himmler started to question von Manstein's loyalty openly and insinuated that he was a defeatist unsuitable to command troops. Von Manstein's frequent arguing combined with these allegations resulted in Hitler relieving von Manstein of his command in March 1944. Instead, on April 2, 1944, Hitler appointed Walther Model, a firm supporter, as commander of Army Group South. Nevertheless, von Manstein received the Swords for his Knight's Cross, the second highest German military honour. Hermann Göring Hermann Wilhelm Göring (also Goering or Goring in English) (January 12, 1893 – October 15, 1946) was an early member of the Nazi party, founder of the Gestapo, and one of the main perpetrators of Nazi Germany. ... Heinrich Himmler Heinrich Himmler (October 7, 1900 - May 23, 1945) was the commander of the German Schutzstaffel and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Otto Moritz Walter Model (IPA /mo:dÉ™l/) (January 24, 1891–April 21, 1945) was a German general, and later a Field Marshal, during World War II. He was noted for his defensive skills, and was nicknamed Hitlers fireman. Model served as an infantry officer in World War I... A stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Bundeswehr, Germanys Armed Forces. ...


After his dismissal, Von Manstein entered an eye clinic in Breslau, recuperated near Dresden and then retired. Although he did not take part in the attempt to kill Hitler in July 1944, he had been contacted by Henning von Tresckow and others in 1943 about the plot. While von Manstein did agree that change was necessary, he refused to join them as he still considered himself bound by duty. (He rejected the approaches with the statement "Preussische Feldmarschälle meutern nicht"—"Prussian Field Marshals do not mutiny.") He also feared that a civil war would ensue. Though he didn't join the plotters, he did not betray them either. In late January of 1945, he collected his family from their homes in Liegnitz and evacuated them to western Germany. He surrendered to British Field Marshal Montgomery and was arrested by British troops on August 23, 1945. Claus von Stauffenberg The July 20 Plot was an attempt to assassinate Adolf Hitler, the dictator of Germany, on July 20, 1944. ... Henning Hermann Robert Karl von Tresckow (January 10, 1901 – July 21, 1944) was a Major General in the German Wehrmacht who is known for organizing German resistance against Hitler. ... Bernard Law Montgomery Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein (November 17, 1887 - March 24, 1976) was a British military officer during World War II often referred to as Monty. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Postwar

Trial

During the Nuremberg trials in 1946, von Manstein was only called as a witness for the defense. Von Manstein was subsequently interned by the British as a prisoner of war in "Special Camp 11" in Bridgend. Later, because of pressure from the Soviets, who wanted him extradited to stand trial in the USSR, the British accepted their indictments and charged him with war crimes, putting him on trial before a British Military Tribunal in Hamburg in August 1949. In part, because of the Soviet demands in the Cold War environment and respect for his military exploits, many in the British military establishment, such as Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery and the military strategist B. H. Liddell Hart, openly expressed sympathy for von Manstein's plight and, along with the likes of Sir Winston Churchill, donated money for the defense. Churchill saw the trial as yet another effort of the then-ruling Attlee government to appease the Soviets. For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... For other uses, see Bridgend (disambiguation). ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard Law Montgomery Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein (November 17, 1887 - March 24, 1976) was a British military officer during World War II often referred to as Monty. ... Basil Henry Liddell Hart (October 31, 1895 _ January 29, 1970) was a military historian and is considered among the great military strategists of the 20th century. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ...


In court, von Manstein's defense, led by the prominent lawyer Reginald Thomas Paget, argued that he had been unaware that genocide was taking place in the territory under his control. It was argued that von Manstein didn't enforce the Commissar order, which called for the immediate execution of Red Army Communist Party commissars. According to his testimony at the Nuremberg trials, Volume 20, pp. 608–609 (August 10, 1946) [1], he received it, but refused to carry it out. He claimed that his superior at the time, Field Marshal von Leeb, tolerated and tacitly approved of his choice, and he also claimed that the order was not carried out in practice. Reginald Thomas Guy Des Voeux Paget, Baron Paget of Northampton, PC, QC, (2 September 1908 – 2 January 1990), also known as Reginald Guy Thomas Du Voeux Paget was a British lawyer and Labour politician. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... The Commissar Order (German: Kommissarbefehl) was a written order given by Adolf Hitler on 6 June 1941, prior to Operation Barbarossa. ... Russian political officer during winter war Commissar is the English transliteration of an official title (комисса́р) used in Russia after the Bolshevik revolution and in the Soviet Union, as well as some other Communist countries. ... For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb in a photo from 1946 Wilhelm Ritter[1] von Leeb (September 5, 1876 - April 29, 1956) was a German Field Marshal during World War II. // Born in Landsberg am Lech, Bavaria as Wilhelm Leeb, he joined the Bavarian Army in 1895 as an officer cadet. ...


However, von Manstein did issue an order on November 20, 1941: his version of the infamous "Reichenau Order" [2], which equated "partisans" and "Jews" and called for draconian measures against them. Hitler commended the "Reichenau Order" as exemplary and encouraged other generals to issue similar orders. Von Manstein was among the minority that voluntarily issued such an order. It stated that: is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Walther von Reichenau (August 16, 1884 - January 17, 1942), German military commander, was the son of a Prussian general and joined the German Army in 1902. ...

"This struggle is not being carried on against the Soviet Armed Forces alone in the established form laid down by European rules of warfare.
Behind the front too, the fighting continues. Partisan snipers dressed as civilians attack single soldiers and small units and try to disrupt our supplies by sabotage with mines and infernal machines. Bolshevists left behind keep the population freed from Bolshevism in a state of unrest by means of terror and attempt thereby to sabotage the political and economic pacification of the country. Harvests and factories are destroyed and the city population in particular is thereby ruthlessly delivered to starvation.
Jewry is the middleman between the enemy in the rear and the remains of the Red Army and the Red leadership still fighting. More strongly than in Europe they hold all key positions of political leadership and administration, of trade and crafts and constitutes a cell for all unrest and possible uprisings.
The Jewish Bolshevik system must be wiped out once and for all and should never again be allowed to invade our European living space.
The German soldier has therefore not only the task of crushing the military potential of this system. He comes also as the bearer of a racial concept and as the avenger of all the cruelties which have been perpetrated on him and on the German people."
...
"The soldier must appreciate the necessity for the harsh punishment of Jewry, the spiritual bearer of the Bolshevik terror. This is also necessary in order to nip in the bud all uprisings which are mostly plotted by Jews."
(Nuremberg trials proceedings, Vol. 20, pp. 639–645 [3])

The order also stated: "The food situation at home makes it essential that the troops should as far as possible be fed off the land and that furthermore the largest possible stocks should be placed at the disposal of the homeland. Particularly in enemy cities a large part of the population will have to go hungry."(ibid.) This also was one of the indictments against von Manstein in Hamburg; not only neglect of civilians, but also exploitation of invaded countries for the sole benefit of the "homeland", something considered illegal by the then current laws of war. The two parts of the laws of war (or Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC)): Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called jus ad bellum. ...


The order additionally stated that "severe steps will be taken against arbitrary action and self-interest, against savagery and indiscipline, against any violation of the honor of the soldier" and that "respect for religious customs, particularly those of Muslim Tartars, must be demanded." (ibid.) The evidence for this order was first presented by prosecutor Telford Taylor on August 10, 1946, in Nuremberg. Von Manstein acknowledged that he had signed this order of November 20, 1941, but claimed that he didn't remember it. This order was a major piece of evidence for the prosecution at his Hamburg trial. Telford Taylor Telford Taylor (February 24, 1908 - May 23, 1998) was a U.S. lawyer best known for his role in the Counsel for the Prosecution at the Nuremberg Trials after World War II, his opposition against Senator McCarthy in the 1950s, and his outspoken criticism of the U.S... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...


While Paget got von Manstein acquitted of many of the seventeen charges, he was still found guilty of two charges and accountable for seven others, mainly for employing scorched earth tactics and for failing to protect the civilian population (Src.: Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives), and was sentenced on December 19, 1949, to 18 years imprisonment. This caused a massive uproar among von Manstein's supporters and the sentence was subsequently reduced to 12 years. However, he was released on May 6, 1953 for medical reasons. For the computer game, see Scorched Earth (computer game). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Von Manstein, one of the highest ranking generals in the Wehrmacht, claimed ignorance of what was happening in the concentration camps. In the Nuremberg trials, he was asked "Did you at that time know anything about conditions in the concentration camps?" to which he replied "No. I heard as little about that as the German people, or possibly even less, because when one was fighting 1,000 kilometers away from Germany, one naturally did not hear about such things. I knew from prewar days that there were two concentration camps, Oranienburg and Dachau, and an officer who at the invitation of the SS had visited such a camp told me that it was simply a typical collection of criminals, besides some political prisoners who, according to what he had seen, were being treated severely but correctly." [4])


Von Manstein's adjutant Alexander Stahlberg reported to Bryan Mark Rigg (author of Hitler’s Jewish Soldiers) the following: Stahlberg pressed von Manstein about the huge numbers of Jews being slaughtered, von Manstein fixed him with a stare. "Do you really believe that?" the Field Marshal said. Stahlberg said he did. "Well, if this really happened," Manstein said, "they're only Jews." [5]


Senior adviser

von Manstein in the mid 1950s

Called on by the West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, von Manstein served as his senior defense advisory and chaired a military sub-committee appointed to advise the parliament on military organization and doctrine for the new German Army, the Bundeswehr and its incorporation into NATO. He later moved with his family to Bavaria. His war memoirs, Verlorene Siege (Lost Victories), were published in Germany in 1955, and translated into English in 1958. In them, he presented the thesis that if the generals had been in charge of strategy instead of Hitler, the war on the Eastern Front could have been won. Erich von Manstein, around 1956 DHM, Berlin 92/1566 http://www. ... Erich von Manstein, around 1956 DHM, Berlin 92/1566 http://www. ... For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ... The Bundeswehr (German for Federal Defence Force;  ) is the name of the unified armed forces of the Federal Republic of Germany and their civil administration and procurement authorities. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ...


Never having been a member of the Nazi party, he had no trouble in West Germany, unlike some of the Reich's more notorious Hitler supporters. Because of his influence, for the first few years of the Bundeswehr, he was seen as the unofficial chief of staff. Even later, his birthday parties were regularly attended by official delegations of Bundeswehr and NATO top leaders, such as General Hans Speidel who was the Commander-in-Chief of the Allied ground forces in Central Europe from 1957 to 1963. This was not the case with pro-Nazi Field Marshals such as Milch, Schörner, von Küchler, and others, who were disregarded and forgotten after the war. This article is about the military alliance. ... (from left to right:) Gerd von Rundstedt, Günther Blumentritt, Hans Speidel and Erwin Rommel in La Rôche Guillon Hans Speidel (born 28 October 1897, Metzingen - died at Bad Honnef, 28 November 1984) was a German general during World War II. Hans Speidel joined the German army in 1914... Erhard Milch (left) with his brother Dr. Werner Milch, who worked as his associate defense counsel at the Nuremberg Trials. ... Ferdinand Schörner (December 5, 1892 - February 7, 1973) was a general and later Field Marshal in the German Wehrmacht during World War II. // Early life He was born in Munich, Bavaria. ... Field Marshal Georg von Küchler Georg Karl Friedrich Wilhelm von Küchler (May 30, 1881 - May 25, 1968) was a German field marshal during World War II. Born in Philippsruhe castle near Hanau, Küchler led the German German Eighteenth Army in 1940 in the invasion of neutral Holland...


Erich von Manstein suffered a stroke and died in Munich on the night of 9 June 1973. He was buried with full military honors. His obituary in The Times on June 13, 1973, stated that "His influence and effect came from powers of mind and depth of knowledge rather than by generating an electrifying current among the troops or 'putting over' his personality." For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... For other uses, see Times. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


References

  1. ^ Stalingrad, Anthony Beevor
  • Barnett, Correlli (ed.) [1989] (2003). Hitler's Generals (reprint ed.). Grove Press. ISBN 0-8021-3994-9.
  • Carver, Sir Michael (1976). The War Lords: Military Commanders Of The Twentieth Century. Boston: Little Brown & Co. ISBN 0-316-13060-5
  • Engelmann, Joachim (1981). Manstein, Stratege und Truppenführer: ein Lebensbericht in Bildern. Podzun-Pallas-Verlag. ISBN 3-7909-0159-8
  • Glantz, David M. (2002). Black Sea Inferno: The German Storm of Sevastopol 1941–1942. Spellmount Publishers. ISBN 1-86227-161-5
  • Galntz, David M. (1993), "Vatutin" in Stalin's Generals, New York: Phoenix Press, pp. 291–292, ISBN 1-842-125133 
  • Liddell Hart, B. H. [1948] (1999). The Other Side of the Hill (2nd ed). Pan Books. ISBN 0-330-37324-2.
  • von Manstein, Erich (2002). Soldat im 20. Jahrhundert (in German). Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 3-7637-5214-5
  • von Manstein, Erich; Powell, Anthony G.; Hart, B. H. Liddell; Blumenson, Martin [1955] (2004). Lost Victories: The War Memoirs of Hitler's Most Brilliant General. Zenith Press. ISBN 0-7603-2054-3
  • von Mellenthin, Friedrich W. (1956). Panzer Battles. New York: Ballantine Books.
  • Megargee, Geoffrey P. (2000) Inside Hitler's High Command. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. ISBN 978-0700610150.
  • Muller, Rolf-Dieter and Uebershar, Gerd R. [1997] (2002) Hitler's War in the East: A Critical Assessment. 2nd ed., New York: Berghahn. ISBN 978-1571812933.
  • Paget, Baron Reginald Thomas (1957). Manstein: His Campaigns and His Trial. London: Collins.
  • Stahlberg, Alexander (1990). Bounden Duty: The Memoirs of a German Officer, 1932–1945. London: Brassey’s. ISBN 3-548-33129-7
  • Stein, Marcel (2007). The Janushead: Field Marshal Von Manstein, A Reappraisal. Solihill, West Midlands, England: Helion and Company. ISBN 1906033021.
  • Wood, James A. Captive Historians, Captive Audience, The German Military History Program, 1945–1961. The Journal of Military History, 69/I (January 2005), pp. 123–147.
  • The British records of the Manstein Trial are now housed in the Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives, at King’s College, London.
  • Von Manstein's whole testimonial at Nuremberg is spread out over three files at the Yale Avalon project: [6], [7] (contains von Manstein's order of November 20, 1941), and [8].
  • Obituary of Manstein by The Times published on June 13, 1973 [9]

Field Marshal (Richard) Michael Power Carver, Baron Carver (April 24, 1915 - December 9, 2001) was a British soldier. ... David M. Glantz is an American military historian and the editor of The Journal of Slavic Military Studies. ... David M. Glantz is an American military historian and the editor of The Journal of Slavic Military Studies. ... Basil Henry Liddell Hart (October 31, 1895 _ January 29, 1970) was a military historian and is considered among the great military strategists of the 20th century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Times. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Erich von Manstein
Military offices
Preceded by
Generaloberst Eugen Ritter von Schobert
Commander of 11. Armee
September 21, 1941 - November 21, 1942
Succeeded by
Army Group Don
Preceded by
11. Armee
Commander of Army Group Don
November 21, 1942 - February 12, 1943
Succeeded by
Army Group South
Preceded by
Generalfeldmarschall Maximilian von Weichs
Commander of Army Group South
February 12, 1943 - September 23, 1944
Succeeded by
Generaloberst Johannes Frießner
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Noel Gilroy Annan (December 25, 1916 – March 2000) was a British military intelligence officer, author, and academic. ... Eugen Ritter von Schobert was a German general who served in World War I and World War II. He was born Eugen Schobert (the Ritter von was due to his later receipt of Bavarias highest military honor) on March 13, 1883 in Würzburg, in the Kingdom of Bavaria... The German Eleventh Army (German: 11. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Army Group Don was a German army group during World War II. Army Group Don was created in the southern sector of the Eastern Front on 22 November 1942. ... The German Eleventh Army (German: 11. ... Army Group Don was a German army group during World War II. Army Group Don was created in the southern sector of the Eastern Front on 22 November 1942. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Maximilian von Weichs Maximilian Maria Joseph Karl Gabriel Lamoral Reichsfreiherr von Weichs zu Glon (12 November 1881 - 27 September 1954) was a German Generalfeldmarschall and a military leader in World War II. He was born into a noble family at Dessau, a son of an Army colonel. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Johannes Frießner (March 22, 1892 – June 26, 1971) was a German general during World War II. Born in Chemnitz, Kingdom of Saxony, Frießner enlisted in the German Army in 1911 and, after seeing extensive duty during World War I, served in the Reichswehr following the war. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... German Grand Admiral Sleeve Insignia Grand Admiral Shoulder Insignia In the German Navy the rank of Grand Admiral (Großadmiral) was considered the highest Naval rank. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Replica of the marshals baton of Generalfeldmarschall von Richthofen (Third Reich) Generalfeldmarschall ( ) (general field marshal, usually translated simply as field marshal, and sometimes written only as Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Austrian Empire. ... Werner von Blomberg. ... Fedor von Bock (December 3, 1880 - May 4, 1945) was an officer in the German military from 1898 to 1942, attaining the rank of Generalfeldmarschall during World War 2. ... 1915 portrait of Eduard Freiherr von Böhm-Ermolli Eduard Freiherr von Böhm-Ermolli (February 12, 1856 - December 9, 1941) was an Italian-born Austrian officer during World War I who rose to the rank of Field Marshal in the Austro-Hungarian Army. ... Walther von Brauchitsch in 1939. ... Ernst Busch (6 July 1885 - 17 July 1945) was a German field marshal during World War II. He was born in Essen-Steele, Germany, and was educated at the Groß Lichterfelde Cadet Academy. ...   (January 12, 1893 – October 15, 1946) was a German politician and military leader, a leading member of the Nazi Party, second in command of the Third Reich, designated successor to Adolf Hitler, and commander of the Luftwaffe (German Air Force). ... Robert Ritter von Greim. ... Wilhelm Bodewin Johann Gustav Keitel (September 22, 1882–October 16, 1946) was a German field marshal (Generalfeldmarschall) and a senior military leader during World War II. // Keitel was born in Helmscherode, Brunswick, German Empire, the son of Carl Keitel, a middle-class landowner, and his wife Apollonia Vissering. ... ==Biography== Albrecht von Kesselring (August 8, 1881 - July 16, 1960) was a Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. One of the most respected and skillful generals of Nazi Germany, he was nicknamed Smiling Albert or Smiling Kesselring. At least one source claims that Kesselring was born on August 8, 1881 [2... Ewald von Kleist Ewald von Kleist Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist (August 8, 1881, Braunfels an der Lahn - ca. ... Günther “Hans” von Kluge (October 30, 1882 – August 19, 1944), was a German military leader. ... Field Marshal Georg von Küchler Georg Karl Friedrich Wilhelm von Küchler (May 30, 1881 - May 25, 1968) was a German field marshal during World War II. Born in Philippsruhe castle near Hanau, Küchler led the German German Eighteenth Army in 1940 in the invasion of neutral Holland... Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb in a photo from 1946 Wilhelm Ritter[1] von Leeb (September 5, 1876 - April 29, 1956) was a German Field Marshal during World War II. // Born in Landsberg am Lech, Bavaria as Wilhelm Leeb, he joined the Bavarian Army in 1895 as an officer cadet. ... Wilhelm List (Siegmund Wilhelm von List) (May 14, 1880 - August 17, 1971), was a German Field Marshal during World War II. He entered the Army in 1898 and served as a staff officer in the First World War. ... Erhard Milch (left) with his brother Dr. Werner Milch, who worked as his associate defense counsel at the Nuremberg Trials. ... Otto Moritz Walter Model (IPA: ) (24 January 1891 – 21 April 1945) was a German general and later field marshal during World War II. He is noted for his defensive battles in the latter half of the war, mostly on the Eastern Front but also in the west, and for his... Friedrich Paulus. ... Walther von Reichenau (August 16, 1884 - January 17, 1942), German military commander, was the son of a Prussian general and joined the German Army in 1902. ... Generalfeldmarschall Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen (10 October 1895 - 12 July 1945) was a German fighter ace during World War I and a general and field marshal of the Luftwaffe during World War II. Von Richthofen was a distant cousin of the German World War I flying ace Manfred von Richthofen... Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel ( ) (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944) was perhaps the most famous German Field Marshal of World War II. He was the commander of the Deutsches Afrika Korps and also became known by the nickname The Desert Fox (Wüstenfuchs,  ) for the skillful military campaigns he waged... Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt (December 12, 1875 - February 24, 1953) was a Generalfeldmarschall of the German Army during World War II. He held some of the highest field commands in all phases of the war. ... Ferdinand Schörner (December 5, 1892 - February 7, 1973) was a general and later Field Marshal in the German Wehrmacht during World War II. // Early life He was born in Munich, Bavaria. ... Hugo Sperrle Hugo Sperrle (February 7, 1885 - April 2, 1953), was a German Field Marshal of the Luftwaffe during World War II. He joined the German Army in 1903 and transferred to the Luftstreitkräfte (German Army Air Service) at the start of World War I, serving as an observer... Maximilian von Weichs Maximilian Maria Joseph Karl Gabriel Lamoral Reichsfreiherr von Weichs zu Glon (12 November 1881 - 27 September 1954) was a German Generalfeldmarschall and a military leader in World War II. He was born into a noble family at Dessau, a son of an Army colonel. ... Job-Wilhelm Georg Erwin von Witzleben (born 4 December 1881 in Breslau; died 8 August 1944 in Berlin, executed) was a German army officer (by 1940 a Generalfeldmarschall) and in the Second World War an Army commander and a resistance fighter in the July 20 Plot. ... The rank of Grand Admiral has also appeared in science fiction literature, most notable the Star Wars Expanded Universe where the rank is held by Grand Admiral Thrawn. ... Karl Dönitz (IPA pronunciation:  ) (born 16 September 1891; died 24 December 1980) was a German naval leader, who commanded the German Navy (Kriegsmarine) during the second half of World War II. Dönitz was also President of Germany for 23 days after Adolf Hitlers suicide. ... Grossadmiral Erich Raeder Erich Johann Albert Raeder (April 24, 1876 - November 6, 1960) was a naval leader in Germany before and during World War II. Raeder attained the highest possible naval rank – that of Großadmiral (Grand Admiral) – in 1939, becoming the first person to hold that rank since Alfred... The penultimate expression of the award: the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with golden Oakleaves, Swords and Diamonds. ... Generalleutnant Ernst-Günther Baade (1897-1945), was a German general serving during World War II. He was wounded in action and died from his injuries on the last day of World War II in Europe. ... A colour photograph of Oberst der Reserve Dr.med. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Heinz Pritzl Bär (21 March 1913 - 28 April 1957) was a German Luftwaffe fighter ace who served through the whole of World War II. He had a total of 221 victories,[1] fighting in all the major German theaters of war, including ETO, MTO and the Eastern Front. ... Erich Bärenfänger was a German officer during World War II. He was born on 12 January 1915 in Menden, Germany, and was the son of an upper post office secretary. ... Gerhard Gerd Barkhorn (20 March 1919 - 8 January 1983) was the second most successful fighter ace of all time after fellow Luftwaffe pilot Erich Hartmann. ... Wilhelm Willi Batz (born 21 May 1916 in Bamberg – died 11 September 1988 in Mauschendorf in Unterfranken) was a German Luftwaffe fighter ace. ... Otto Baum, (born 15 November 1911 in Stetten; died 18 June 1998) was was a SS-Oberführer of the Waffen-SS. He was also a recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Werner Baumbach (1916-1953) was a bomber pilot in the German Luftwaffe during World War 2 and commander of the secret bomber wing KG 200. ... General Fritz Bayerlein Fritz Bayerlein (January 14, 1899 - January 30, 1970) was a German Panzer general during the Second World War. ... Hermann-Heinrich Behrend (25 August 1898 – 19 June 1977) was a German Generalmajor, serving during World War II. Iron Cross (1914) 2nd Class (9 June 1917) 1st Class (4 November 1918) Wound Badge (1914) in Black Mecklenburgisches-Verdienstkreuz 2nd Class (2 January 1918) Cross of Honor (21 January 1935) Clasp... Wilhelm Bittrich Wilhelm Willi Bittrich (February 26, 1894 – April 19, 1979) was a General of the German SS during World War II. Born in the town of Wernigerode in the Harz mountains of Germany, Bittrich served as an army officer during World War I. He joined the SS-Verfügungstruppe... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Georg Bochmann, (born 18 September 1913 in Albernau; died 8 June 1973) was an SS-Oberführer of the Waffen-SS. He was also a recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Major Alwin Boerst (born 20 October 1910 in Osterode – Killed in action 30 March 1944 near IaÅŸi) was a German World War II Luftwaffe Stuka ace[1]. Boerst participated in the Battle of Crete and assisted in the sinking of HMS Kelly and HMS Kashmir[2]. Together with his... Georg Freiherr von Boeselager (August 25, 1915 – August 27, 1944) was a German nobleman and officer of the Wehrmacht, who ultimately served as Colonel (Oberst) of Cavalry. ... Albrecht Brandi (1914-1966) was a famous German U-boat commander. ... Hermann Breith (7 May 1892 – 3 September 1964) was a German general of the Panzertruppe, serving during World War II. Breith commanded the III. Panzerkorps. ... Josef Bremm (born 3 May 1914 in Mannebach Pfalz, died 21 October 1998 in Monreal), was a German Officer, serving during World War II. He is noted for being the last recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords which he received from... Kurt Bühlingen (born 13 December 1917 in Granschütz, Thuringia, died 11 August 1985 in Nidda, Hesse) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1936 until the end of hostilities 8 May 1945. ... Karl Decker (30 November 1897 – 21 April 1945) was a German general in the infantry, serving during World War II. Trapped in the Ruhr Pocket, Decker committed suicide on 21 April 1945. ... August Dieckmann (born 29 May 1912 in Cadenberge near Hannover; killed in action 10 October 1943 at the Dnjepr) was a highly decorated Standartenführer in the Waffen-SS. Iron Cross (1939) 2nd and 1st Class Infantry Assault Badge in Silver Close Combat Clasp in Bronze Wound Badge in Black... Eduard Dietl (Born 21 July 1890, Bad Aibling, Died 23 June 1944, Styria) Lieutenant General Eduard Dietl commanded the German 3rd Mountain Division that participated in the German invasion of Norway on April 9 and 10, 1940. ... General Sepp Dietrich Josef Sepp Dietrich (May 28, 1892–April 21/22, 1966) was a German Waffen-SS general, an SS-Oberstgruppenführer, and one of the closest men to Hitler. ... Helmut Dörner (26 June 1909 in Mönchengladbach – 11 February 1945 in Budapest) was a highly decorated German Waffen-SS officer. ... Hans Dorr (April 7, 1912 - April 17, 1945) was a German Waffen-SS Obersturmbannführer who served with the and was a commander of the SS-Regiment Germania. ... Oberst Alfred Druschel (born 4 February 1917 in Bindsachsen, Büdingen, Hesse; Killed in action on 1 January 1945 near Aachen in Unternehmen Bodenplatte) was a German Luftwaffe combat pilot and Flying ace during World War II. He was the first combat pilot to be honored with the Knights... Maximilian Reichsfreiherr von Edelsheim[1], (born 6 July 1897 in Berlin; died 26 April 1994 in Konstanz) was a German general during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Karl Eibl (23 July 1891 – 21 January 1943) was a German general during World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Obergruppenführer Hermann Otto Fegelein (30 October 1906–c. ... Fritz Feßmann (25 December 1913 – 11 October 1944) was a German officer serving during World War II and recipient of the coveted Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Walter Fries (22 April 1894 – 6 August 1982) was a German General of the tank troops, serving during World War II. Adolf Hitler requested his death sentence in March 1945 for abandoning the Fortress Warsaw. ... Adolf Dolfo Joseph Ferdinand Galland[1] (19 March 1912-9 February 1996) was a World War II German fighter pilot and commander of Germanys fighter force (General der Jagdflieger) from 1941 to 1945. ... Waldemar von Gazen called Waldemar von Gaza (born 6 December 1917) was an Officer in the German Wehrmacht and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords during World War II. Iron Cross (1939) 2nd and 1st Class Panzer Badge in Bronze (3. ... Herbert Otto Gille (March 8, 1897 in Gandersheim - December 27, 1966) was a German general, and the highest decorated member of the Waffen SS. Military Career He started his military career as a first lieutenant during the First World War . ... Gordon MacGollob (16 June 1912 - 8 September 1987) was an Austrian fighter pilot and flying ace in the Luftwaffe from 1938 to 1945) during World War 2. ... Walter Gorn (24 September 1898 – 10 July 1968) was a German general, serving during World War II. Panzer Badge in Bronze Close Combat Clasp in Bronze Wound Badge in Silver Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class German Cross in Gold Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves... Category: ... Fritz-Hubert Gräser (January 3, 1888 - November 4, 1960), was a German general of World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Robert Ritter von Greim. ... Franz Griesbach (21 December 1892 – 24 September 1984) was a German Generalmajor, serving during World War II. Infantry Assault Badge in Silver Wound Badge in Gold Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class German Cross in Gold Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords Knights... Anton Toni Hackl (born 25 March 1915 in Regensburg, died 10 July 1984 in Regensburg) was a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords during World War II. Anton Hackl flew about 1000 combat missions and... Heinz Harmel (29 September 1906 in Metz, Lorraine (region) - 2 September 2000 in Krefeld) was a highly decorated German Waffen-SS officer. ... Josef Harpe (1887-1968), was a German Generaloberst, serving during World War II. Iron Cross (1914) 2nd and 1st Class Wound Badge (1914) in Black Cross of Honor Wehrmacht-Dienstauszeichnung 4th to 1st Class Clasp to the Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class Panzer Badge in Silver Eastern Front Medal... Erich Alfred Bubi Hartmann (April 19, 1922 - September 20, 1993), also nicknamed The Blond Knight Of Germany by friends and The Black Devil by his enemies, is the most successful fighter ace in the history of aerial combat. ... Walter Hartmann (23 July 1891 – 11 March 1977) was a German general of Artillery, serving during World War II. Wound Badge in Gold Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords Knights Cross (10 August 1941) 340. ... Paul Papa Hausser (October 7, 1880 - December 21, 1972) was an officer in the German Army, achieving the high rank of Lieutenant General in the inter-war Reichswehr, after retirement from regular Army he became the father (thus the nickname “Papa”) of the Waffen-SS and one of its most... Richard Heidrich (27 July 1896 – 22 December 1947), was a highly decorated German Fallschirmjäger and general during World War II. Richard Heidrich volunteered for military service in World War I. He became an officer and won the Iron Cross 1st Class. ... Ludwig Heilmann (9 August 1903 – 26 October 1959), was a highly decorated German Fallschirmjäger and general during World War II. // Ludwig Heilmann entered the Reichswehr in early 1921. ... Gotthard Heinrici. ... Oberst Joachim Helbig (born 10 September 1915 in Börln, Torgau-Oschatz; killed in car accident on 5 October 1985 while on vacation in Spain) was a bomber pilot in the German Luftwaffe during World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Traugott Herr (1890-1976), was a German general of the Panzer troops, serving during World War II. Wound Badge in Black 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class (14 September 1914) 1st Class (21 October 1915) House Order of Hohenzollern with Swords Bavarian Military Merit Cross (3. ... Hajo Herrmann (born 1 August 1913 in Kiel, Germany), is a German lawyer focusing his activities mostly on the defense of former Nazis and Neo-Nazis, deniers of the holocaust and political activists of the far-right. ... Otto Hitzfeld (7 May 1898 – 6 December 1990) was a German Officer during both World War I and World War II. He was awarded the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords on 9 May 1945. ... Oberstleutnant Hermann Hogeback (25 August 1914 – 15 February 2004) was a German World War II Luftwaffe bomber pilot and flew more than 500 operational sorties. ... Generalleutnant Dr. rer. ... General Hermann Hoth Hermann Papa Hoth (12 April 1885 - 26 January 1971) was a general of the Third Reich during World War II, notable for victories in France and on the Eastern Front, and later, after serving six years in prison for war crimes, as a writer on military history. ... General der Panzertruppen Hans-Valentin Hube Hans-Valentin Hube (29 October 1890-21st April 1944) was a General who served in the German Heer during the First and Second World Wars. ... Herbert Ihlefeld (born 1 June 1914 in Pinnow, Pommern, died 8 August 1995 in Wenningsen, Niedersachsen) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1936 until the end of World War II in 1945. ... Hans Jordan (27 December 1892 – 20 April 1975) was a German general during World War II. 1938 - 1939 Senior Instructor War School Weiner Neustadt 1939 - 1941 Commanding Officer 49th Regiment 1941 - 1942 General Officer Commanding 7th Division 1942 - 1944 General Officer Commanding VI Corps 1944 Acting General Officer Commanding 9th... Arthur Jüttner (18 August 1908 – 1 December 2003) was a German Oberst, serving during World War II. Close Combat Clasp in Silver German Cross in Gold (23 February 1943) Iron Cross (1939) 2nd and 1st Class Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords Knight... Hans Källner (9 October 1898 – 18 April 1945) was a German General, serving during World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... ==Biography== Albrecht von Kesselring (August 8, 1881 - July 16, 1960) was a Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. One of the most respected and skillful generals of Nazi Germany, he was nicknamed Smiling Albert or Smiling Kesselring. At least one source claims that Kesselring was born on August 8, 1881 [2... Friedrich Kirchner (26 March 1885 – 6 April 1960) was a German general during World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Otto Kittel (February 21, 1917 - February 14, 1945) was a World War II pilot. ... Ewald von Kleist Ewald von Kleist Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist (August 8, 1881, Braunfels an der Lahn - ca. ... Günther “Hans” von Kluge (October 30, 1882 – August 19, 1944), was a German military leader. ... Otto von Knobelsdorff (1886-1966), was a German general of the Panzer troops, serving during World War II. Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords Knights Cross (17 September 1941) 322. ... Alfons König (29 December 1898 – 8 July 1944) was a German officer in the infantry, serving during World War II and a recipient of the coveted Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Wolfgang Kretzschmar (2 July 1907 – 27 December 1944) was a German officer serving during World War II and recipient of the coveted Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Hans Kreysing, (born 17 August 1890; died 14 April 1969) was a German general who commanded the . ... Hans Kroh (born 13 May 1907 in Heidelberg; died 18 July 1967 in Braunschweig) was a highly decorated German Fallschirmjäger and general in the Bundeswehr. ... For other persons named Walter Krüger, see Walter Krüger (disambiguation). ... Otto Kumm, (born 1 October 1909 in Hamburg; died 23 March 2004) was was a SS-Brigadeführer and Generalmajor of the Waffen-SS. He was also a recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Oberst Dr. Ernst Kupfer (born 2 July 1907 in Coburg – Killed in aircraft accident 6 November 1943 60km north of Thessaloniki in the Belasica mountain range) was a German World War II Luftwaffe Stuka ace. ... Major Friedrich Lang (born 12 January 1915 in Mährisch-Trübau – died 29 December 2003 in Hannover) was a German World War II Luftwaffe Stuka ace[1]. Verwundetenabzeichen in Black Front Flying Clasp of the Luftwaffe in Gold with Pennant 1. ... Heinz-Georg Lemm (born 1 June 1919 in Schwerin; died 17 November 1994 in Ruppichteroth) fought in the 12th Infantry Division. ... German Night-fighter pilot. ... One of Nazi Germanys most successful U-Boat aces, Wolfgang Lüth (15 October 1913–13 May 1945) was the youngest German ever appointed captain, and the youngest to ever command the German Naval Academy. ... Heinrich Freiherr von Lüttwitz[1] (1896-1969), was a German general of the Panzer troops, serving during World War II. His cousins Smilo Freiherr von Lüttwitz and Hyazinth Graf Strachwitz von Gross-Zauche und Camminetz were also decorated with the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with... Smilo Freiherr von Lüttwitz[1] (1895-1976), was a German general of the Panzer troops, serving during World War II and son of Walther von Lüttwitz. ... Günther Lützow (4 September 1912 - 24 April 1945) was a German Luftwaffe fighter ace and a leader in the Fighter Pilots Revolt. Lützow was credited with 110 victories achieved in over 300 combat missions. ... Hellmuth Mäder, (born 5 July 1908 in Rotterode, Thuringia; died 12 May 1984 in Konstanz) was a German general during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Hasso-Eccard Freiherr von Manteuffel (January 14, 1897 — September 24, 1978) was a German soldier and politician of the 20th century. ... Hans-Joachim Marseille (13 December 1919 - 30 September 1942) was a Luftwaffe pilot and flying ace during World War II. He was nicknamed the Star of Africa. Marseille scored all but seven of his 158 victories against the British Commonwealths Desert Air Force over North Africa. ... Dr. Karl Mauss (May 17, 1898 - February 9, 1959) was one of the most distinguished tank commanders of the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was a lieutenant general and commander of The 7th Panzer Division, and one of only 31 ever to receive the Knights Cross with Oakleaves... Dr. rer. ... Egon Mayer (born 19 August 1917 in Konstanz at the Bodensee, killed in action March 2, 1944 near Montmédy) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1937 until his death in 1944. ... Eugen Meindl (16 July 1892 – 24 January 1951) was a highly decorated German Fallschirmjäger and general during World War II. // Eugen Meindl was born in Donaueschingen. ... Kurt Panzermeyer Meyer in 1942 after being awarded the Oakleaves to the Knights Cross Kurt Panzermeyer Meyer (December 23, 1910-December 23, 1961) served as an officer in the Waffen-SS during the Second World War. ... Otto Moritz Walter Model (IPA: ) (24 January 1891 – 21 April 1945) was a German general and later field marshal during World War II. He is noted for his defensive battles in the latter half of the war, mostly on the Eastern Front but also in the west, and for his... Werner Mölders (March 18, 1913 - November 22, 1941) was a German Luftwaffe World War II fighter ace. ... Dietrich von Müller (16 September 1891 – 3 January 1961) was a German Officer during both World War I and World War II. Just before the end of World War II he was promoted to Generalleutnant and awarded the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Friedrich-Wilhelm Müller (b. ... Werner Mummert (31 March 1897 to January/February 1950) was a German officer during both World War I and World War II. Mummert was born in Luttwitz/Saxony. ... Joachim Müncheberg was born on 18 December 1918 at Friedrichsdorf. ... Walter Nehring (August 15, 1892 - April 20, 1983), was a German General of World War II, known for his involvement with the Afrika Korps. ... Hermann Niehoff was a German General during World War II. Niehoff was the garrison commander of Festung Breslau during the Battle of Breslau. ... Horst Niemack (10 March 1909 – 7 April 1992) was a German general in the infantry, serving during World War II and in the Bundeswehr. ... Major Theodor Nordmann (born 18 December 1918 in Dorsten – Killed in flying accident 19 January 1945 near near Insterburg) was a German World War II Luftwaffe Stuka ace[1]. His radio operator and gunner, Feldwebel Gerhard Rothe, was one of only 15 Stuka gunners to be honored with the Knight... Walter Nowi Nowotny (December 7, 1920 - November 8, 1944) was a Sudeten German fighter ace of World War II with 258 confirmed victories in 442 missions, 255 victories over Russian pilots. ... Hans von Obstfelder (1886-1976), was a German general of the Infantry, serving during World War II. Bavarian Military Merit Cross (3. ... Walter Gulle Oesau (28 June 1913 – 11 May 1944) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1934 until his death in 1944. ... Hermann Leopold August von Oppeln-Bronikowski (born 2 January 1899 in Berlin; died 19 September 1966 in Gaißach, in the district of Bad Tölz-Wolfratshausen, Bavaria) was German Army officer and panzer ace. ... Max-Hellmuth Ostermann (born 11 December 1917 in Hamburg, killed in action 9 August 1942 near Amossovo on the Eastern front) was a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords during World War II. // Max-Hellmuth... Joachim Peiper (January 30, 1915 - July 13, 1976) more often known as Jochen Peiper from the common German nickname for Joachim, was a senior Waffen-SS officer in World War II and a convicted war criminal. ... Generalmajor Dietrich Peltz (born 9 June 1914 in Gera – died 10 August 2001 in Munich) was a German World War II Luftwaffe bomber pilot. ... Hans Philipp (born 13 March 1917 in Meißen, Sachsen, killed in action 8 October 1943 near Neuenhaus in the Nederlands) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1936 until he was killed in action 8 October 1943 by P-47 Thunderbolts. ... Georg-Wilhelm Postel (born 25 April 1896 in Zittau; died 20 September 1953 in Shakhty, Russia) was a general in the German Wehrmacht during World War II. Postel was taken prisoner of war on August 30, 1944 after the capitulation of Romania and died in custody in 1953. ... Hermann Prieß (May 24, 1901 - February 2, 1985) was the commander of 3rd SS Division Totenkopf following the death of Theodor Eicke in February 1943. ... Josef Pips Priller (27 July 1915 - 20 May 1961) was a Luftwaffe World War II fighter ace. ... Günther Rall (10 March 1918) was the third most successful Luftwaffe fighter ace of World War 2. ... Hermann-Bernhard Gerhard Ramcke (January 24, 1889 - July 04, 1968) is a winner of the Knights Cross with Swords, Oak Leaves, and Diamonds, one of only 27 people in the German military to do so. ... Hermann Recknagel (18 July 1892 – 27 February 1945) was a German general during World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Ernst-Wilhelm Reinert (born 2 February 1919 in Lindenthal) was a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords[1] during World War II. Reinert flew 715 combat missions and was officially credited with shooting down 174... Alfred-Hermann Reinhardt (15 November 1897 – 15 January 1973) was a German Generalleutnant serving during World War II. Wound Badge in Black German Cross in Gold Infantry Assault Badge in Silver Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords Knight... Georg-Hans Reinhardt (March 1st, 1887 to November 23rd, 1963)) was Colonel General of the German Third Reichs Panzer Group 3, 3rd Panzer Army, Army Group Center. ... Lothar Rendulic (November 23, 1887 – January 18, 1971) was a Colonel General in the Wehrmacht during WWII. Rendulic was born on in Wiener Neustadt, Austria to a Croatian family (Croatian spelling of the surname is Rendulić). He entered the Austro-Hungarian Army in 1910 and served during World War I... Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel ( ) (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944) was perhaps the most famous German Field Marshal of World War II. He was the commander of the Deutsches Afrika Korps and also became known by the nickname The Desert Fox (Wüstenfuchs,  ) for the skillful military campaigns he waged... Hans-Ulrich Rudel (July 2, 1916 – December 18, 1982) was a Stuka dive-bomber pilot during World War II. Rudel is famous for being the most highly decorated German serviceman of the war. ... Erich Rudorffer (born 1 November 1917 in Zwochau, Sachsen) is a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace, one of a handful who served with the Luftwaffe through the whole of World War II. He had a total of 222 victories, fighting in all the major German theaters of war, including ETO... Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt (December 12, 1875 - February 24, 1953) was a Generalfeldmarschall of the German Army during World War II. He held some of the highest field commands in all phases of the war. ... Max Sachsenheimer (5 December 1909 – 2 June 1973) was a German Generalmajor, serving during World War II. Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class Infantry Assault Badge in Silver Wound Badge in Black German Cross in Gold (3 February 1944) Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and... Dietrich von Saucken (1892–1990) was a General in the German Army (Wehrmacht) during World War II. He was born in East Prussia in 1892 and personified all the aristocratic Prussian militarists who despised the braune Bande of Nazis. ... Prince Heinrich Zu Sayn-Wittgenstein was one of two fighting night-fighter pilot aces in the Luftwaffe in World War Two. ... Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer (February 16, 1922-1950) was the top night fighter ace of all time. ... SS-Gruppenführer Fritz von Scholz, as commander of 11. ... Ferdinand Schörner (December 5, 1892 - February 7, 1973) was a general and later Field Marshal in the German Wehrmacht during World War II. // Early life He was born in Munich, Bavaria. ... Werner Schröer (born 12 February 1918 in Mülheim an der Ruhr, died 10 February 1985 in Ottobrunn) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1937, initially as a member of the ground staff, until the end of World War II 8... SS-Brigadeführer Hinrich Schuldt (1901 – 1944) was a German Waffen-SS officer and a winner of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Adelbert Schulz (1900 to 1/28/1944) was a Generalmajor and Division Commander in the German Wehrmacht in WWII. He was one of only 27 people to be awarded the Knights Cross with oakleaves, swords, and diamonds. ... Karl Friedrich “Fritz” Wilhelm Schulz (15 October 1897 – 30 November 1976) was a German general of infantry, serving during World War II and recipient of the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Karl-Lothar Schulz (30 April 1907 – 26 September 1972), was a highly decorated German Fallschirmjäger and general during World War II. Karl-Lothar Schulz was born in Königsberg, East Prussia. ... General der Panzertruppe (Lieutenant-General) Gerhard (Gerd) Helmuth Detloff Graf von Schwerin was a German commander in World War II who was tasked with defending the city of Aachen while in command of the 116. ... SS-Brigadeführer Sylvester Stadler (1910 - 1995) was a German Waffen-SS officer, a commander of the 4. ... Reiner Stahel (1892 – 1952 or 1955), also known as Rainer Stahel, was a German and Finnish military officer and a notable member of the Nazi Party. ... Leopold Bazi Steinbatz (born 25 October 1918 in Wien, Austria, killed in action 23 June 1942 near Volchansk, Kharkov region, on the Eastern front) was a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace and sole non Officer recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords... This article or section is missing needed references or citation of sources. ... Johannes Steinhoff (September 15, 1913 - February 21, 1994) was a German Luftwaffe fighter ace of World War II and a senior West German air force officer after the war . ... Generalleutnant der Reserve & SS-Brigadeführer Hyazinth Graf Strachwitz von Groß-Zauche und Camminetz, 1943 Hyazinth Graf Strachwitz von Groß-Zauche und Camminetz (July 30, 1893 -April 25, 1968) was a Silesian officer and panzer ace. ... Werner Streib (born 13 June 1911 in Pforzheim, died 15 June 1986 in München) was a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace and recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords during World War II. After the war he attained the rank of... Reinhard Teddy Suhren (April 16, 1916 - August 25, 1984) was a German U-boat commander in World War II and younger brother of Korvettenkapitän (Ing. ... Karl Alfred Thieme[1] (28 May 1914 – 6 June 2004) was a German officer serving during World War II and recipient of the coveted Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Theodor Tolsdorff (November 3, 1909 to May 25, 1978) was lieutenant general and one of 27 carriers of Oak Leaves with Swords and Diamonds to the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross in the Second World War . ... Erich Topp (b. ... Erich Walther (5 August 1903 – 26 December 1947) was a German general of the Fallschirmjäger who served during World War II. Erich Walther joined the Berlin Police on 1 April 1924 as a police cadet. ... Wilhelm Wegener (29 April 1895 – 24 September 1944) was a German general of infantry, serving during World War II. He was on his way to his headquarters when he was killed in action by Soviet ground attack aircraft on 24 September 1944. ... Otto Weidinger (27 May 1914 – 11 January 1990) was a member of the German Waffen-SS and a commander of SS-PzGrenRgt 4 Der Führer during World War II. He held the rank of SS-Obersturmbannführer. ... General Helmuth Weidling was the German officer who surrended Berlin to the Soviet forces in the final stages of world war two. ... Maximilian Wengler (14 January 1890 – 25 April 1945) was a German general serving during World War II and recipient of the coveted Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. ... Wend von Wietersheim (18 April 1900 – 19 September 1975) was a German general of Infantry, serving during World War II. Iron Cross (1914), second and first class with 1939 claps 2nd Class (1 October 1939) 1st Class (20 May 1940) Panzer Badge in Silver Wound Badge in Black German Cross... Wolf-Dietrich Fürst Wilcke (born 11 March 1913 in Schrimm, Posen, killed in action 23 March 1944 near Schöppenstedt) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1935 until his death on 23 March 1944. ... Theodor Wisch (born 13 December 1907 in Wesselburener Koog Schleswig-Holstein, died 11 January 1995 in Norderstedt), was a German Officer in the Waffen-SS, serving during World War II. Infantry Assault Badge in Silver Wound Badge in Silver German Cross in Gold (25 February 1943) Iron Cross 2nd Class... Günther-Eberhardt Wisliceny (5 September 1912 in Angerburg - 25 August 1985 in Hannover) was a highly decorated German Waffen-SS officer. ... Michael Wittmann (April 22, 1914 - August 8, 1944) was a German SS-Hauptsturmführer during World War II. Wittmans crews (chiefly gunner Balthasar Bobby Woll, also a Knights Cross holder) are credited with the confirmed destruction of 138 tanks and 141 artillery pieces, along with an unknown number... Josef Sepp Wurmheller (born 4 May 1917 in Hausham, Bavaria, killed in action 22 June 1944 near Alençon, France) was a German World War II fighter ace who served in the Luftwaffe from 1937 until his death on 22 June 1944. ... In this Japanese name, the family name is Yamamoto Fleet Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto ) (4 April 1884 – 18 April 1943) was Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet during World War II, graduate of Imperial Japanese Naval Academy and an alumnus of U.S. Naval War College and Harvard University (1919... Werner Ziegler (30 April 1916 – 15 April 2001) was a German Oberstleutnant, serving during World War II. Werner Ziegler was released as a prisoner of war in 1946. ... The following is an attempt at the complete list of Knight’s Cross recipients. ...

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Achtung Panzer! - Erich von Manstein! (1151 words)
In 1932, Erich von Mansteinwas promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel and received the command of Jager Battalion.In 1933, situation in Germany changed and von Manstein was promoted to the rank of Colonel and in 1935 was posted to the General Staff of the Wehrmacht.
Von Manstein started his attack on December 12th and by 24th was within 50km from "Fortress Stalingrad", when his advance was halted and he was forced into 200km long retreat, which continued until February of 1943.
In late January of 1945, von Manstein collected his family members from their homes in Liegnitz (Legnica) and evacuated them to Celle in West Germany.In May of 1945, Erich von Manstein was arrested by the British and taken to POW camp in Luneberg and later to Nüremburg.
Erich von Manstein (4091 words)
Von Manstein, therefore, had to rely on the railway line through Zaporozhye but it was not that efficient given the fact that the big Dnieper bridge which the Russians had destroyed in 1941 was still closed to traffic.
Von Manstein's fear of Army Group Don still being cut off prompted him to advise O.K.H. (Army High Command) that, given the fact that the ratio of Russian forces to his own and those of Army Group B were somewhere around 1:8, it would, therefore, be necessary to improve this ratio.
Von Manstein, during the course of the ensuing battle of Kharkov, considered his objective not to be the city itself but rather the destruction of the Russian forces in and around it.
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