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Encyclopedia > Eric Robert Rudolph
1990s style wanted poster
FBI FUGITIVE
PUBLICITY
TEN MOST WANTED FUGITIVE
Born: September 19, 1966 (1966-09-19) (age 41)
Merritt Island, Florida
Age: 40
Crime: serial bombings
Date Added: May 5, 1998
Date Caught: May 31, 2003[1]
Number on List: #454
Captured

Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966), also known as the Olympic Park Bomber, is an American domestic terrorist,[2][3] who committed a series of bombings across the southern United States, which killed three people and injured at least 150 others. He declared that his bombings were part of a guerrilla campaign against abortion and what he describes as "the homosexual agenda." He spent years as the FBI's most wanted criminal fugitive, but was eventually caught. In 2005 Rudolph pleaded guilty to numerous federal and state homicide charges and accepted five consecutive life sentences in exchange for avoiding a trial and the death penalty. Rudolph was connected with the Christian Identity movement;[3] today, he self-identifies as a Catholic.[4] is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Merritt Island is a census designated place in Brevard County, on the Atlantic coast of the U.S. state of Florida. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... A domestic terrorist is one who is a citizen of the country the acts of terrorism is directed against. ... This article is becoming very long. ... This article is about explosive devices. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Guerilla may refer to Guerrilla warfare. ... The homosexual agenda (or the gay agenda) is a term used by some social conservatives to describe the goal of increasing LGBT acceptance through public policies, media exposure, and cultural change. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The following data is cached and may not be completely up to date. ... Look up fugitive in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A plea bargain is an agreement in a criminal case in which a prosecutor and a defendant arrange to settle the case against the defendant. ... Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... // For the general identity of an individual with certain core essential religious doctrines, see Christianity. ...

Contents

Early life

Rudolph was born in Merritt Island, Florida. After his father, Robert, died in 1981, he moved with his mother and siblings to Nantahala, Macon County, in Western North Carolina. He attended ninth grade at the Nantahala School but dropped out after that year and worked as a carpenter with his older brother Daniel. His mother believed in survivalism and instilled this ideology in him. Merritt Island is a census designated place in Brevard County, on the Atlantic coast of the U.S. state of Florida. ... Macon County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Carpenter at work in Tennessee, June 1942. ... For other uses, see Survivalism (disambiguation). ...


After Rudolph received his GED, he attended Western Carolina University in Cullowhee for two semesters in 1985 and 1986. In August 1987, Rudolph enlisted in the U.S. Army, undergoing basic training at Fort Benning in Georgia. He was discharged in January 1989 while serving with the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell in Kentucky, reportedly for smoking marijuana.[5] In 1988, the year before his discharge, Rudolph had attended the Air Assault School at Fort Campbell. He never rose above the rank of Private E-1. The GED, General Educational Development, or General Equivalence Degree Test, is a test that certifies the taker has attained American or Canadian high school-level academic skills. ... Western Carolina University is one of the sixteen public universities that make up the University of North Carolina System. ... Cullowhee is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located in Jackson County, North Carolina. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... U.S. Army recruits learn about bayonet fighting skills in an infantry Basic Combat Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Fort Benning is a base facility of the United States military outside Columbus, Georgia. ... A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from his or her obligation to serve. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... Fort Campbell is a large post of the United States Army located approximately ten miles northwest of downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja,[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ... This article is about the use of the term rank. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ...


Bombings

Of the bombings Rudolph committed, the most notorious was the Centennial Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta on July 27, 1996, during the 1996 Summer Olympics. The blast killed spectator Alice Hawthorne and wounded 111 others. Hawthorne had attended the Olympics with her daughter because she wanted to watch the American basketball team. Melih Uzunyol, a Turkish cameraman who ran to the scene following the blast, died of a heart attack. Rudolph's motive for the bombings, according to his April 13, 2005 statement, was political: The Centennial Olympic Park bombing was a terrorist bombing on July 27, 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1996 Summer Olympics, the first of four committed by Eric Robert Rudolph. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Cameraman redirects here. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

In the summer of 1996, the world converged upon Atlanta for the Olympic Games. Under the protection and auspices of the regime in Washington millions of people came to celebrate the ideals of global socialism. Multinational corporations spent billions of dollars, and Washington organized an army of security to protect these best of all games. Even though the conception and purpose of the so-called Olympic movement is to promote the values of global socialism, as perfectly expressed in the song "Imagine" by John Lennon, which was the theme of the 1996 Games even though the purpose of the Olympics is to promote these despicable ideals, the purpose of the attack on July 27 was to confound, anger and embarrass the Washington government in the eyes of the world for its abominable sanctioning of abortion on demand.
The plan was to force the cancellation of the Games, or at least create a state of insecurity to empty the streets around the venues and thereby eat into the vast amounts of money invested.

If this was indeed the plan, it was unsuccessful. Olympic organizers did not even cancel the day's events. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... A multinational corporation (MNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ... Imagine is a utopian-themed song performed by John Lennon, which appears on his 1971 album, Imagine. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ...


Rudolph's statement did authoritatively clear Richard Jewell, a Centennial Olympic Park security guard, of any involvement in the bombings. Jewell had been falsely accused of participation in the bombing a few days after the incident, after having been initially hailed as a hero for being the first one to spot Rudolph's explosive device, for saving lives, and for helping to clear the area. When he came (erroneously) under FBI suspicion for involvement in the crime, Jewell became the prime suspect, and an international news story. Rudolph's confession vindicated Jewell. For other persons named Richard Jewell, see Richard Jewell (disambiguation). ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


Rudolph has also confessed to the bombings of an abortion clinic in the Atlanta suburb of Sandy Springs on January 16, 1997, a gay and lesbian nightclub, the Otherside Lounge, in Atlanta on February 21, 1997, injuring five, and an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama on January 29, 1998, killing officer Robert Sanderson and critically injuring nurse Emily Lyons. Rudolph's bombs were made of dynamite surrounded by nails which acted as shrapnel. This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Sandy Springs (once known as Hammond) is an unincorporated city located in Fulton County, Georgia, north of Atlanta and south of Roswell. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... A gay bar is a drinking establishment that caters exclusively or primarily to a gay and/or lesbian clientele. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State County Jefferson, Shelby Government  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (D) Area  - City  151. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth (kieselguhr) as an adsorbent. ... It has been suggested that Fragmentation (weaponry) be merged into this article or section. ...


He is said to have targeted the health clinic and office building because abortions were performed there, and targeted the Otherside Lounge because it was a predominantly lesbian nightclub.


Fugitive

Rudolph was first identified as a suspect in the Alabama bombing by the Department of Justice on February 14, 1998. He was named as a suspect in the three Atlanta incidents on October 14, 1998. The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


On May 5, 1998, he became the 454th Fugitive listed by the FBI on the Ten Most Wanted list. The FBI considered him to be armed and extremely dangerous, and offered a $1,000,000 reward for information leading directly to his arrest. He spent more than five years in the Appalachian wilderness as a fugitive, during which federal and amateur search teams scoured the area without success. is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... In the 1990s, for the fifth decade, the United States FBI continued to maintain a public list of the people it regarded as the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ...


It is thought that Rudolph had the assistance of sympathizers while evading capture. Some in the area were vocal in support of him. Two country music songs were written about him and a locally top-selling T-shirt read: "Run Rudolph Run." Many Christian Identity adherents are outspoken in their support of Rudolph; the Anti-Defamation League, a Jewish civil rights group, notes that "extremist chatter on the Internet has praised Rudolph as 'a hero' and some followers of hate groups are calling for further acts of violence to be modeled after the bombings he is accused of committing."[6] country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States. ... The Anti-Defamation League (or ADL) is an advocacy group founded by Bnai Brith in the United States whose stated aim is to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience and, if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... A hate group is an organized group or movement that advocates hate, hostility, or violence towards members of a race, ethnicity, religion, gender or other designated sector of society, or that supports and publishes assertions and argumentation characteristic of hate groups without necessarily explicitly advocating such hate or violence that...


The Rudolph family supported Eric and believed he was innocent of all charges,[7] but found themselves under intense questioning and surveillance.[8] On March 7, 1998, Daniel Rudolph, Eric's older brother, videotaped himself cutting off one of his own hands with a radial arm saw in order to, in his words, "send a message to the FBI and the media."[9] The hand was successfully reattached. is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... A radial arm saw is a machine intended for cutting materials to length. ...


According to Rudolph's own writings, he survived during his years as a fugitive by camping in the woods, gathering acorns and salamanders, pilfering vegetable gardens, stealing grain from a grain silo, and raiding dumpsters in a nearby town.[10][11] For other uses, see Acorn (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salamander (disambiguation). ...


Arrest and guilty plea

Rudolph was arrested in Murphy, North Carolina, on May 31, 2003,[12] by police officer Jeffrey Scott Postell of the Murphy Police Department as Rudolph scavenged for food in a garbage can behind a Save-A-Lot store at about 4 a.m.; Postell, on routine patrol, had just joined the department on his 21st birthday less than a year before Rudolph's capture and originally suspected a burglary in progress.[13] Murphy is a town located in Cherokee County, North Carolina. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Save-A-Lot is a grocery store chain that is the thirteenth-largest retail chain and sixth-largest chain under a single banner with more than one thousand stores in the United States and $4 billion in sales. ...


Rudolph was unarmed and did not resist arrest. When arrested, he was clean-shaven, with a trimmed mustache, and wearing new sneakers, potentially indicating that he was harbored by supporters while on the run. Federal authorities charged him on October 14, 2003. Despite his reputed antisemitism, Rudolph was defended by Jewish attorney Richard S. Jaffe, who said he knew of Rudolph's beliefs but stated that Rudolph took no issue with his Jewish faith. A sneaker is an individual hired to break into places in order to test their security; analogous to tiger team. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


On April 8, 2005, the Department of Justice announced that Rudolph agreed to plead guilty in all the attacks he was accused of executing, thus avoiding the death penalty. The deal was confirmed after the FBI found 250 pounds (113 kg) of dynamite he hid in the forests of North Carolina. His revelation of the dynamite was a condition of his plea agreement. He made his pleas in person in Birmingham and Atlanta courts on April 13. He also released a statement in which he explained his actions and rationalized them as serving the cause of anti-abortion and anti-gay activism. April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A plea bargain is an agreement in a criminal case in which a prosecutor and a defendant arrange to settle the case against the defendant. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth (kieselguhr) as an adsorbent. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... A plea bargain (also plea agreement, plea deal or copping a plea) is an agreement in a criminal case in which a prosecutor and a defendant arrange to settle the case against the defendant. ... ... Homophobia is a term used to describe: A culturally determined phobia manifesting as fear, revulsion, or contempt for desire or physical love between people of the same sex. ...


In his statement, he claimed that he had "deprived the government of its goal of sentencing me to death," and that "the fact that I have entered an agreement with the government is purely a tactical choice on my part and in no way legitimates the moral authority of the government to judge this matter or impute my guilt."[14]


The terms of the plea agreement were that Rudolph would be sentenced to four consecutive life terms. He was officially sentenced July 18, 2005, to two consecutive life terms without parole for the 1998 murder of a police officer.[15] He was sentenced for his various bombings in Atlanta on August 22, 2005, receiving three consecutive life terms. That same day, Rudolph was sent to the ADX Florence supermax federal prison. Rudolph is inmate # 18282-058 within the US federal prison system. Like other supermax inmates, he spends 22½ hours per day in his 80 ft² (7.4 m²) concrete cell.[16] is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... It has been suggested that Medical parole be merged into this article or section. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The ADX Florence facility from the outside The United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility (ADX) in Florence, CO. is a supermax prison in Florence, Colorado, USA. It is unofficially known as ADX Florence, Florence ADMAX, Supermax, or The Alcatraz of the Rockies. ... Supermax is the name used to describe control-unit prisons, or units within prisons, which represent the most secure levels of custody in prison systems. ...


Alleged motivations

After Rudolph's arrest for the bombings, the Washington Post reported that the FBI considered Rudolph to have "had a long association with the radical Christian Identity movement, which asserts that North European whites are the direct descendants of the lost tribes of Israel, God's chosen people."[17] Christian Identity is a white supremacist sect that holds that those who are not white Christians will be condemned to Hell. In the same article, the Post reported that some FBI investigators believed Rudolph may have written letters that claimed responsibility for the nightclub and abortion clinic bombings on behalf of the Army of God, a terrorist group associated with Christian Identity. ... Northern Europe is a name for the northern part of the European continent. ... It has been suggested that Israelite Diaspora be merged into this article or section. ... In Judaism, chosenness is the belief that the Jews are a chosen people: chosen to be in a covenant with God. ... White supremacy is a racist ideology which holds the belief that white people are superior to other races. ... The Inferno redirects here. ... The Army of God (AOG) is a pro-life terrorist organization which holds that it is lawful and theologically justified to use force to end abortion in the United States, its members have also been involved in the horrific murders of homosexuals. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


In a statement released after he entered a guilty plea, Rudolph denied being a supporter of the Christian Identity movement, claiming that his involvement amounted to a brief association with the daughter of a Christian Identity adherent, later identified as Pastor Daniel Gayman. When asked about his religion he said, "I was born a Catholic, and with forgiveness I hope to die one."[4] In other written statements, Rudolph has cited Biblical passages and offered religious motives for his militant opposition to abortion.[18]. This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


Some mainstream books and media outlets have portrayed Rudolph as a "Christian Identity extremist" or a "Christian terrorist." Harper's Magazine referred to him as a "Christian terrorist." [19] The NPR radio program "On Point" referred to him as a "Christian Identity extremist."[20] The Voice of America reported that Rudolph could be seen as part of an "attempt to try to use a Christian faith to try to forge a kind of racial and social purity." [21] Writing in 2004, authors Michael Shermer and Dennis McFarland saw Rudolph's story as an example of "religious extremism in America," warning that the phenomenon he represented was "particularly potent when gathered together under the umbrella of militia groups,"[22] whom they believe to have protected Rudolph while he was a fugitive. “Harpers” redirects here. ... Voice of America logo Voice of America (VOA), is the official external radio and television broadcasting service of the United States federal government. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Michael Shermer Michael Shermer (born September 8, 1954 in Glendale, California) is a science writer, historian of science, founder of The Skeptics Society, and editor of its magazine Skeptic, which is largely devoted to investigating and debunking pseudoscientific and supernatural claims. ...


Rudolph himself has written "Many good people continue to send me money and books. Most of them have, of course, an agenda; mostly born-again Christians looking to save my soul. I suppose the assumption is made that because I'm in here I must be a 'sinner' in need of salvation, and they would be glad to sell me a ticket to heaven, hawking this salvation like peanuts at a ballgame. I do appreciate their charity, but I could really do without the condescension. They have been so nice I would hate to break it to them that I really prefer Nietzsche to the Bible."[23] In Christianity, the term born again or regenerated is synonymous with spiritual rebirth—salvation. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salvation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. This article is about the legume. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ...


Writings from prison

Although Federal Bureau of Prisons regulations give wardens the right to restrict or reject correspondence by an inmate for "the protection of the public, or if it might facilitate criminal activity," including material "which may lead to the use of physical violence," essays which condone violence and militant action written by Rudolph, who is incarcerated in the most secure part of ADX Florence in Colorado, are being published by an Army of God anti-abortion activist who posts Rudolph's essays on an Internet website. [citation needed] While victims maintain that Rudolph's messages are harassment and could incite violence, according to Alice H. Martin, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama at the time of Rudolph's prosecution for the Alabama bombing, there is little the prison can do to restrict the publication of his letters. "An inmate does not lose his freedom of speech," she said.[24] However, the Department of Justice in 2006 criticized the same prison for not properly screening the mail of three inmates convicted in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing after determining the men sent letters from the prison to suspected terrorists overseas. The Federal Bureau of Prisons is a subdivision of the United States Department of Justice, and is responsible for the administration of the federal prison system. ... The ADX Florence facility from the outside The United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility (ADX) in Florence, CO. is a supermax prison in Florence, Colorado, USA. It is unofficially known as ADX Florence, Florence ADMAX, Supermax, or The Alcatraz of the Rockies. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... The United States District Court for the Northern District of Alabama is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties: Bibb, Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Colbert, Cullman, De Kalb, Etowah, Fayette, Franklin, Greene, Jackson, Jefferson, Lamar, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Morgan, Pickens, Randolph... Citizens of the United States often treat free speech as a fundamental right and often a matter of patriotism. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... For the second attack on the World Trade Center in 2001, see September 11, 2001 attacks. ...


See also

Issues of discussion Abortion-related violence is criminal violence committed against individuals and organizations that provide abortion. ... The Army of God (AOG) is a pro-life terrorist organization which holds that it is lawful and theologically justified to use force to end abortion in the United States, its members have also been involved in the horrific murders of homosexuals. ... // For the general identity of an individual with certain core essential religious doctrines, see Christianity. ... The Ku Klux Klan with a fiery cross Christian terrorism is a form of militant extremism that attempts to spread fear and terror, to perpetrate ideological goals, through violent attacks against civilian populations. ... A delusion is commonly defined as a fixed false belief and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception. ... For other senses of this word, see dogma (disambiguation). ... Terrorist redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gay bashing. ...

References

  1. ^ Press Release, John Ashcroft, FBI National Press Office, May 31, 2003
  2. ^ Washington Post, "Is Terrorism Tied To Christian Sect?", June 2, 2003. Retrieved Jan. 29, 2007
  3. ^ a b CNN, "Eric Robert Rudolph: Loner and survivalist", December 13, 2003. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  4. ^ a b Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press (2005). Eric Rudolph, proud killer (HTML). Newspaper online version. Associated Press/The Decatur Daily. Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  5. ^ Jeffrey Gettleman with David M. Halbfinger, The New York Times, "Suspect in '96 Olympic Bombing And 3 Other Attacks Is Caught", June 1, 2003. Retrieved Oct 9, 2007.
  6. ^ Anti-Defamation League, "Extremist Chatter Praises Eric Rudolph as 'Hero.'", June 3, 2003. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  7. ^ Henry Schuster, CNN, "Why did Rudolph do it?", April 15, 2005. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  8. ^ Jeff Stein, Salon.com, "A twisted tale of two brothers", Jan. 29, 1999. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  9. ^ CNN, "Bombing suspect's brother cuts hand off with saw", March 9, 1998. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  10. ^ Lick the Floor January 27, 2004
  11. ^ Lil
  12. ^ FBI, "Statement of Attorney General John Ashcroft regarding the arrest of Eric Robert Rudolph", May 31, 2003. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  13. ^ "Atlanta Olympic bombing suspect arrested." CNN. 31 May 2003.
  14. ^ Excerpts from Eric Rudolph's statement April 13, 2005
  15. ^ Associated Press, "Eric Rudolph Gets Life Without Parole", July 18, 2005. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  16. ^ R. Scott Rappold, The Colorado Springs Gazette, "Olympic bomber Rudolph calls Supermax home",September 14, 2005. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  17. ^ Alan Cooperman, Washington Post, "Is Terrorism Tied To Christian Sect?", June 2, 2003. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2006.
  18. ^ Full text of Eric Rudolph's written statement Army of God website
  19. ^ Harpers Magazine Terrorism
  20. ^ Most Wanted Extremist, Eric Rudolph, Caught June 03, 2003
  21. ^ Arrest of Accused Olympic Park Bomber Sparks Debate on 'Christian Terrorism', 05 Jun 2003, VOANews
  22. ^ The Science of Good and Evil
  23. ^ Special report: Eric Rudolph writes home July 5, 2005
  24. ^ Extremist Taunts His Victims From Prison May 14, 2007

John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) is an American politician who was the 79th United States Attorney General. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Decatur Daily is a daily newspaper serving Decatur and the Tennessee Valley in North Alabama. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Anti-Defamation League (or ADL) is an advocacy group founded by Bnai Brith in the United States whose stated aim is to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience and, if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Salon. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Gazette is a newspaper based in Colorado Springs, Colorado that is lauded for its local reporting and large margins that make it easier to read. ... The Science of Good and Evil is a book by Michael Shermer on ethics and evolutionary psychology. ...

Sources

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Eric Robert Rudolph - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1496 words)
Rudolph, who according to CNN was "connected with the Christian Identity movement, a militant, racist, and anti-Semitic organization," [1], declared that his bombings were part of a guerrilla campaign against abortion, what he describes as "the homosexual agenda," and perceived support for them from the United States government.
Rudolph was born on September 19, 1966, in Merritt Island, Florida.
Rudolph was first identified as a suspect in the Alabama bombing by the Department of Justice on February 14, 1998.
Centennial Olympic Park bombing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1017 words)
Rudolph, at the time, was unknown to authorities, and a lone bomber profile made sense to FBI investigators.
Rudolph eluded capture and became a fugitive; officials believed he had disappeared into the rugged southern Appalachian Mountains, familiar from his youth.
Rudolph read a statement at his sentencing in which he apologized to the victims and families only of the Centennial Park bombing, reiterating that he was angry at the government and hoped the Olympics would be cancelled.
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