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Encyclopedia > Ered Mithrin

In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Ered Mithrin or Grey Mountains was a large mountain range to the north of Rhovanion. J. R. R. Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from by H. Carpenter) John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhovanion or Wilderland was a large region of northern Middle-earth. ...


The Grey Mountains were the last remnecents of the wall of the Ered Engrin or Iron Mountains, which once stretched all over the north of Middle-earth, but were broken at the end of the First Age. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Iron Mountains or Ered Engrin were an immense mountain range in the north. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ...


North of the Grey Mountains lay Forodwaith, or the Northern Waste. This land was known as Dor Daidelos during the First Age, but most of it was destroyed in the breaking of Arda. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Forodwaith was the name both of a region and the people that lived there. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein all of the places mentioned in the Lord Of The Rings and related material once existed. ...


In the maps of the Second and Third Age it looked like the Ered Mithrin were but a northern arm of the Hithaeglir, but in truth this mountain range was far older, stemming from the creation of Arda, whereas the Misty Mountains had not been raised until after the Years of the Lamps. The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Years of the Lamps are one of the three great time-periods of Arda. ...


Where the Ered Mithrin met at their western end with the Hithaeglir lay Mount Gundabad, an ancient Dwarven holy site. The stretch of mountains west of the Hithaeglir which still formed one range with the Grey Mountains was known as the Mountains of Angmar, another remnant of the Ered Engrin. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Mount Gundabad is a mountain at the northern extremity of the Misty Mountains in Middle-earth. ... The Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth are beings of short stature who all possess beards, and are often friendly with Hobbits although long suspicious of Elves. ...


The eastern end of the Ered Mithrin was split in two branches, and in between lay the Withered Heath, where dragons still bred. After that was a long gap, until the Iron Hills continued the old line of the Iron Mountains again. Erebor, the Lonely Mountain, was not part of either range. J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth features dragons closely based on those of European legend. ... The Iron Hills are a range of mountains in the north of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, east of the Lonely Mountain, that are home to a Dwarf mining community. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Lonely Mountain (Sindarin Erebor) is a mountain in the northeast of Rhovanion. ...


From East to West the mountains stretched some 350 Númenórean Miles, and the sources of the Great River Anduin (Langwell), the river Greylin, and the Forest River of Mirkwood arose in this range. Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Greylin is a river in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, one of the two (the other being the Langwell river) which flows from the north Anduin river. ... Mirkwood was the name of the Maeotian marshes which separated the Goths from the Huns in the Norse Hervarar saga. ...


Of old the Grey Mountains had been mined by Dwarves of Durin's Folk, but by the Third Age all Dwarven strongholds had been abandoned or raided by dragons. Its sole purpose now seemed to be to divide Forodwaith from Wilderland. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Durins folk is the most important folk of Dwarves. ... J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth features dragons closely based on those of European legend. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhovanion or Wilderland was a large region of northern Middle-earth. ...


Another line of Grey Mountains in Middle-earth are seen on the Ambarkanta map: these are a series of mountains which continue the line of the Blue Mountains as the western edge of Endor, but on the southern half of the continent. Since it appears in no narrative, it is erroneously believed to be an invention of Middle-earth role-playing games.[1] The Shaping of Middle-Earth is the fourth volume of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Ered Luin or Blue Mountains, also known as Ered Lindon, is the mountain range at the far west of Eriador, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... A role-playing game (RPG) is a type of game in which players assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create narratives. ...


Since no maps of the entire world exist after the First Age, it is unknown if this mountain line still existed in the Third Age, whether reduced or intact. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ered Mithrin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (438 words)
Tolkien, the Ered Mithrin or Grey Mountains was a large mountain range to the north of Rhovanion.
In the maps of the Second and Third Age it looked like the Ered Mithrin were but a northern arm of the Hithaeglir, but in truth this mountain range was far older, stemming from the creation of Arda, whereas the Misty Mountains had not been raised until after the Years of the Lamps.
The eastern end of the Ered Mithrin was split in two branches, and in between lay the Withered Heath, where dragons still bred.
Iron Mountains (Middle-earth) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (171 words)
Tolkien's fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Iron Mountains or Ered Engrin were an immense mountain range in the north.
Of old the Iron Mountains connected the Blue Mountains (Ered Luin) of the West to the Red Mountains (Orocarni) of the East, but in the wars between the Valar and Melkor the mountain range was distorted.
Remnants of the range in the Third Age included the Mountains of Angmar in northern Eriador, as well as the Ered Mithrin and the Iron Hills of northern Wilderland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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