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Encyclopedia > Epitrachelion
epitrachelion
epitrachelion

The Epitrachelion (from the Greek, επιτραχηλιον "around the neck"; often called simply a stole in casual English-language usage) is the liturgical vestment worn by priests and bishops of the Orthodox Church as the symbol of their priesthood, corresponding to the Western stole. It is essentially the orarion adapted for priests and bishops, worn around the neck with the two ends hanging down equally in front (more or less to the ankle) and with the two adjacent sides sewn or buttoned together up the center, leaving enough space through which to place the head. In practice, the epitrachelion is made to be worn this only way, often tailored to lie flat around the neck, and is never actually unfastened. It is usually made of brocade with seven embroidered or appliquéd crosses, one at the back of the neck and three down each side. Image File history File links Made it myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Made it myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ... Roman Catholic priest LCDR Allen R. Kuss (USN) aboard USS Enterprise A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... For other uses, see Bishop (disambiguation). ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ... The Orarion is the distinguishing vestment of the deacon in the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Brocade can stands for: thick heavy fabric into which raised patterns have been woven. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Applique (or appliqué) is a technique in which pieces of fabric are sewn onto a foundation piece of fabric to create designs. ... The traditional form of the Christian cross, known as the Latin cross The Christian cross is a familiar religious symbol of Christianity. ...


The priest wears the epitrachelion whenever serving as a priest (as opposed to simply attending a service). For some services, e.g. vespers or matins, he wears the epitrachelion by itself. When he is fully vested for the Divine Liturgy, he wears the epitrachelion over the sticharion and under the zone and the phelonion. When the bishop is fully vested he wears the epitrachelion over the sticharion and under the zone, the sakkos and the omophorion. Vespers is the evening prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... Matins is the morning prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... The sticharion is a liturgical vestment of the Eastern Orthodox Church, roughly analogous to the dalmatic or tunicle of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Zone is a liturgical belt worn as a vestment by priests and bishops of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The phelonion (plural, phelonia) is a liturgical vestment worn by a priest of the Eastern Christian tradition. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... The sticharion is a liturgical vestment of the Eastern Orthodox Church, roughly analogous to the dalmatic or tunicle of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Zone is a liturgical belt worn as a vestment by priests and bishops of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The Sakkos (Greek: σάκκος) is a vestment worn by an Orthodox bishop instead of the priests phelonion. ... In the Orthodox liturgical tradition, the omophorion is one of the bishops vestments and the symbol of his spiritual and ecclesiastical authority. ...


If a priest is simply attending a service, he wears no vestments, but will put on his epitrachelion (and often his epimanikia) before receiving the Eucharist. Epimanikia (singular epimanikion) are liturgical vestments of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The Syriac Orthodox hamnikho (literally 'necklace') and the Armenian Orthodox urār are worn in a similar fashion. The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... The Armenian Apostolic Church, sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church is one of the original churches, having separated from the then-still-united Roman Catholic/Byzantine Orthodox church in 506, after the Council of Chalcedon (see Oriental Orthodoxy). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Epitrachelion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (299 words)
The Epitrachelion (from the Greek, επιτραχηλιον "around the neck"; often called simply a stole in casual English-language usage) is the liturgical vestment worn by priests and bishops of the Orthodox Church as the symbol of their priesthood, corresponding to the Western stole.
It is essentially the orarion adapted for priests and bishops, worn around the neck with the two ends hanging down equally in front (more or less to the ankle) and with the two adjacent sides sewn or buttoned together up the center, leaving enough space through which to place the head.
When the bishop is fully vested he wears the epitrachelion over the sticharion and under the zone, the sakkos and the omophorion.
Vestment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1378 words)
The three forms of stole (Orarion, Epitrachelion, and Omophorion) are marks of rank.
The three outer garments (Sticharion, Phelonion, and Sakkos) serve to distinguish the clergy from the laity.
Epitrachelion (Greek: ἐπιτραχήλιον), "over the neck") - This stole is worn by priests and bishops as the symbol of their priesthood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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