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Encyclopedia > Epic poetry
Tablet containing a fragment of the epic Gilgamesh
Tablet containing a fragment of the epic Gilgamesh
Literature
Major forms

Epic · Romance · Novel
Tragedy · Comedy · Drama · Satire
EPIC can refer to: Engineering Pathways Integrated Curriculum Electronic Privacy Information Center Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing Enhanced Programmable ircII Client - an Internet Relay Chat client for Unix-like systems El Paso Intelligence Center End Poverty in California movement European Product Information Co-operation Evergreen Political Information Center, a student group... Deluge Tablet (Babylonian, Gilgamesh) http://www. ... Deluge Tablet (Babylonian, Gilgamesh) http://www. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ...

Media

Performance · Book Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ...

Techniques

Prose · Poetry Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ... This article is about the art form. ...

History and lists

Basic topics · Literary terms
History · Modern history
Books · Writers
Literary awards · Poetry awards Literature is prose, written or oral, including fiction and non-fiction, drama and poetry. ... The following is a list of literary terms; that is, those words used in discussion, classification, criticism, and analysis of literature. ... The history of literature is the historical development of writings in prose or poetry which attempt to provide entertainment, enlightenment, or instruction to the reader/hearer/observer, as well as the development of the literary techniques used in the communication of these pieces. ... This article is homosexual and should be burned the second in a series of The History of Literature. ... These are lists of books: List of books by title List of books by author Lists of authors List of anonymously published works (List of Hiberno-Saxon illustrated manuscripts) List of books by genre or type List of books by award or notoriety List of best-selling books List of... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that the section Literature from the article List of prizes, medals, and awards be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of awards that are, or have been, given out to writers of poetry, either for a specific poem, collection of poems, or body of work. ...

Discussion

Criticism · Theory · Magazines Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... Literary theory is the theory (or the philosophy) of the interpretation of literature and literary criticism. ... A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. ...

An epic is a lengthy, revered narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.[1] A work need not be written to qualify as an epic, although even the works of such great poets as Homer, Dante Alighieri, and John Milton would be unlikely to have survived without being written down. The first epics are known as primary, or original, epics. Epics that attempt to imitate these like Virgil's The Aeneid and John Milton's Paradise Lost are known as literary, or secondary, epics.[2] Another word for epic poetry is epyllion (plural: epyllia) which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means 'little epic', came in use in the Nineteenth century. It refers primarily to the type of erotic and mythological long elegy of which Ovid remains the master; to a lesser degree, the term includes some poems of the English Renaissance, particularly those influenced by Ovid. One suggested example of classical epyllion may be seen in the story of Nisus and Euryalus in Book IX of The Aeneid. A narrative poem is an extended poem which tells a story. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... Dante redirects here. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... A narrative is a construct created in a suitable medium (speech, writing, images) that describes a sequence of fictional or non-fictional events. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Romantics redirects here. ... This article is about a system of myths. ... In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson conveyed by a work. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation). ... The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the early 16th century to the early 17th century. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Vergil in the 1st century BC that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ...

Contents

Oral epics or world folk epics

The first epics were products of preliterate societies and oral poetic traditions. In these traditions, poetry is transmitted to the audience and from performer to performer by purely oral means. Children reading. ... A society is a group of people living or working together. ... This article is about the historical discipline; see Oral tradition for the oral transmission of historical information. ...


Early twentieth-century studies of living oral epic traditions in the Balkans by Milman Parry and Albert Lord demonstrated the paratactic model used for composing these poems. What they demonstrated was that oral epics tend to be constructed in short episodes, each of equal status, interest and importance. This facilitates memorization, as the poet is recalling each episode in turn and using the completed episodes to recreate the entire epic as he performs it. Balkan redirects here. ... Milman Parry (1902 -December 3, 1935) was a scholar of epic poetry. ... Albert Bates Lord was a Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literature at Harvard who, after the untimely death of Milman Parry, carried on that scholars research into epic literature. ... For other uses, see Parataxis (disambiguation). ...


Parry and Lord also showed that the most likely source for written texts of the epics of Homer was dictation from an oral performance. This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ...

Epic: a long narrative poem in elevated stature presenting characters of high position in adventures forming an organic whole through their relation to a central heroic figure and through their development of episodes important to the history of a nation or race.

Epics have 6 main characteristics:

  1. The hero is of imposing stature, of national or international importance, and of great historical or legendary significance.
  2. The setting is vast, covering many nations, the world, or the universe.
  3. The action consists of deeds of great valor or requiring superhuman courage.
  4. Supernatural forces—gods, angels, demons—insert themselves in the action.
  5. A style of sustained elevation is used.
  6. The poet retains a measure of objectivity.

The hero generally participates in a cyclical journey or quest, faces adversaries that try to defeat him in his journey, and returns home significantly transformed by his journey. The epic hero illustrates traits, performs deeds, and exemplifies certain morals that are valued by the society from which the epic originates. Many epic heroes are recurring characters in the legends of their native culture. A recurring character is a fictional character, usually in a prime time TV series, who is not a main character, but appears from time to time during the series run. ...


Conventions of Epics:

  1. Praepositio: Opens by stating the theme or cause of the epic. This may take the form of a purpose (as in Milton, who proposed "to justify the ways of God to men"); of a question (as in the Iliad, where Homer asks the Muse which god it was who caused the war); or of a situation (as in the Song of Roland, with Charlemagne in Spain).
  2. Invocation: Writer invokes a Muse, one of the nine daughters of Zeus. The poet prays to the Muses to provide him with divine inspiration to tell the story of a great hero. (This convention is obviously restricted to cultures which were influenced by Classical culture: the Epic of Gilgamesh, for example, or the Bhagavata Purana would obviously not contain this element)
  3. In medias res: narrative opens "in the middle of things", with the hero at his lowest point. Usually flashbacks show earlier portions of the story.
  4. Enumeratio: Catalogues and genealogies are given. These long lists of objects, places, and people place the finite action of the epic within a broader, universal context. Often, the poet is also paying homage to the ancestors of audience members.
  5. Epithet: Heavy use of repetition or stock phrases: e.g., Homer's "rosy-fingered dawn" and "wine-dark sea."


Literate societies have often copied the epic format; the earliest European examples of which the text survives are the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes and Virgil's Aeneid, which follow both the style and subject matter of Homer. Other obvious examples are Nonnus' Dionysiaca, Tulsidas' Sri Ramacharit Manas. // Milton may refer to: People with the surname Milton: John Milton (1608–1674), English poet Milton (surname), other people with that surname People with the given name Milton: Milton (given name) In Australia: Milton, New South Wales Milton, Queensland Milton railway station, Brisbane In Canada: Milton, Ontario Milton (GO Station... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... The Song of Roland (La Chanson de Roland) is an 11th century Old French epic poem about the Battle of Roncevaux Pass (or Roncesvalles) fought by Roland of the Brittany Marches and his fellow paladins. ... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... An invocation (from the Latin verb invocare to call on, invoke) is: A supplication. ... For the rock band, see Muse (band). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from Babylonia and is among the earliest known literary works. ... The Bhagavata Purana (sometimes rendered as Bhagavatha Purana), also known as the Srimad Bhagavatam, written c. ... For other uses, see In Medias Res (disambiguation). ... Enumeratio is the figure of amplification in which a subject is divided, detailing parts, causes, effects, or consequences to make a point more forcibly. ... Look up epithet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A characteristic of Homers style is the use of recurring epithets, such as rosy-fingered dawn or swift-footed Achilles. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... The Greek epic poet Nonnus (Greek Nonnos), a native of Panopolis (Akhmim) in the Egyptian Thebaid, probably lived at the end of the 4th or the beginning of the 5th century AD. He produced the Dionysiaca, an epic tale of the god Dionysus, a paraphrase of the Gospel of John... Gosvāmī Tulsīdās (1532-1623; Devanāgarī: तुलसीदास) was an Awadhi poet and philosopher. ... Sri Raamcharitmaanas is one of the most revered books among Hindus. ...


Notable epic poems

This list can be compared with two others, national epic and list of world folk-epics.[3]

A national epic is an epic poem or similar work which seeks or is believed to capture and express the essence or spirit of a particular nation; not necessarily a nation-state, but at least an ethnic or linguistic group with aspirations to independence or autonomy. ... World folk-epics are those epics which are not just literary masterpieces but also an integral part of the weltanschauung of a people. ...

Ancient epics (to 500)

The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from Babylonia and is among the earliest known literary works. ... Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Iraq. ... The 18th century BC Akkadian Atra-Hasis epic, named after its human hero, contains both a creation and a flood account, and is one of three surviving Babylonian flood stories. ... Enûma Elish is the creation epic of Babylonian mythology. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mesopotamian mythology. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ... The book Works and Days Works and Days (in ancient Greek , which sometimes goes by the Latin name Opera et Dies, as in the OCT) is a Greek poem of some 800 verses written by Hesiod (around 700 BC). ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Veda Vyasa(Contemporary painting) Vyāsa (DevanāgarÄ«: व्यास) is a central and much revered figure in the majority of Hindu traditions. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... Cyclic Poets are epic poets who followed Homer and wrote poems and songs about the Trojan war. ... The Epic Cycle (Greek: Επικός Κύκλος) was a collection of Ancient Greek epic poems that related the story of the Trojan War, which includes the Kypria, the Aithiopis, the Little Iliad, the Iliou persis (The Sack of Troy), the Nostoi (Returns), and the Telegony. ... The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ... The Aithiopis (Greek: Αἰθιοπίς; Latin: Aethiopis) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... The Little Iliad (Greek: Ἰλιὰς μικρά, Ilias mikra; Latin: Ilias parva) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... The Iliou persis (English: Sack of Ilion; Greek: Ἰλίου πέρσις; also known as Iliupersis, esp. ... The Nostoi (Greek: Νόστοι; also known as Nosti in Latin; English: Returns;) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... The Telegony (Greek: Τηλεγόνεια, Telegoneia; Latin: Telegonia) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... The Theban Cycle is a collection of four lost epics of ancient Greek literature which related the mythical history of the Boiotian city of Thebes. ... The Thebaid is an Ancient Greek epic poem of uncertain authorship (see Cyclic poets) sometimes attributed by early writers to Homer. ... Epigoni (in Greek, Epigonoi The Next Generation) was an early Greek epic, a sequel to the Thebaid and therefore grouped in the Theban cycle. ... Alcmeonis (in Greek, Alkmeonis or Alkmaionis) is the title of a lost early Greek epic which is considered to have formed part of the Theban cycle. ... In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. ... The Naupaktia (Greek: Ναυπάκτια; Latin Naupactia) is a lost epic poem of ancient Greek literature. ... Minyas (Greek: Μινυάς) was the title of an early Greek epic poem, probably dating to the sixth century BC, which is now lost and whose author is unknown. ... Vaisampayana or VaiÅ›ampayana was a celebrated sage who was the original teacher of the Black Yajur-Veda. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Veda Vyasa(Contemporary painting) Vyāsa (DevanāgarÄ«: व्यास) is a central and much revered figure in the majority of Hindu traditions. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Valmiki composes the Ramayana Valmiki (Sanskrit: वाल्मीकि, vālmÄ«ki) born as Ratnakar is a legendary Hindu sage (maharishi) traditionally regarded as the author of the epic, Ramayana, based on the attribution in the text of the epic itself[1]. He was the tenth child of Pracheta. ... Aristeas was a semi-legendary Greek poet and miracle-worker, a native of Proconnesus in Asia Minor, active ca. ... Asius may refer to: Asios Hyrtakides. ... A king in Greek mythology, Orchomenus was the father of Elara. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ... The Annales School is a school of historical writing named after the French scholarly journal Annales dhistoire économique et sociale (later called Annales. ... Quintus Ennius (239 - 169 BC) was a writer during the period of the Roman Republic, and is often considered the father of Roman poetry. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Táin Bó Cúailnge (the driving-off of cows of Cooley, more usually rendered The Cattle Raid of Cooley or The Táin) is the central tale in the Ulster Cycle, one of the four great cycles that make up the surviving corpus of Irish mythology. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation). ... This article is about the poem. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (November 3, AD 39-April 30, 65), better known in English as Lucan, was a Roman poet, and is one of the outstanding figures of the Silver Latin period. ... Combatants Roman Republic Carthage Commanders Publius Cornelius Scipio†, Tiberius Sempronius Longus Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Gaius Flaminius†, Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus†, Lucius Aemilius Paullus†, Gaius Terentius Varro, Marcus Livius Salinator, Gaius Claudius Nero, Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Calvus†, Masinissa, Minucius†, Servilius Geminus† Hannibal Barca, Hasdrubal Barca†, Mago Barca†, Hasdrubal Gisco†, Syphax... Silius Italicus, in full Titus Catius Silius Italicus (AD 25 or 26 - 101), was a Latin epic poet. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Gaius Valerius Flaccus (late 1st century AD) was a Roman poet, who flourished under the emperors Vespasian and Titus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ... Buddhacarita refers to two early biographies of Gautama Buddha. ... AÅ›vaghoá¹£a (?80-?150 CE) (Devanagari: अश्वघोष) was an Indian philosopher-poet, born in Saketa in Central India. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... Manimegalai, Seevaga Sindhamani, Valayaapathi, Kundalakesi and Silapadhigaaram constitute the Five Great Epics of Tamil Literature. ... Cilappatikaram (Tamil: சிலப்பதிகாரம் IPA tʃɪlÊŒppʌθɪkɑːɹʌm),[1] is one of the five great epics of ancient Tamil Literature. ... Bold textIlango Adigal (Tamil: ) was a great Tamil poet, who was instrumental in the creation of Silappathikaram, one of the five great epics of South India. ... Manimekalai, written by Seethalai Saathanar, is one of the masterpieces of Tamil literature and belongs to The Five Great Epics of Tamil Literature. ... Seevaga-chintamani (transliterated with innumerable variations) is a classical Tamil language epic poem. ... Tirutakakatevar was a Tamil poet who wrote Jivaka-chintamani, one of the five greatest epics of Tamil literature, (Manimegalai, Silapadhigaaram , Valayaapathi and Kundalakesi, along with Jivaka-chintamani, constitute the five great epics of Tamil literature). ... Kundalakesi (குண்டலகேசி) is a fragmentary Tamil epic. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Jain and Jaina redirect here. ... The Posthomerica is an epic poem by Quintus of Smyrna, probably written in the latter half of the 4th century AD, and telling the story of the period between the death of Hektor and the fall of Ilium. ... Quintus Smyrnaeus, Greek epic poet, probably flourished in the latter part of the 4th century AD. He is sometimes called Quintus Calaber, because the only manuscript of his poem was discovered at Otranto in Calabria by Cardinal Bessarion in 1450. ... Gaius Vettius Aquilinus Juvencus was a Spanish Christian and Latin poet of the fourth century. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Kālidāsa (DevanāgarÄ«: कालिदास) was a Sanskrit poet and dramatist, his title Kavikulaguru (Preceptor of All Poets) bearing testimony to his stature. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... // Introduction Raghuvamsa, in Hindu mythology is believed to be a lineage/race of warrior kings tracing its ancestry to Surya. ... Nonnus, Greek epic poet, a native of Panopolis (Akhmim) in the Egyptian Thebaid, probably lived at the end of the 4th or the beginning of the 5th century AD. His principal work is the Dionysiaca, an epic in forty-eight books, the main subject of which is the expedition of... The Greek epic poet Nonnus (Greek Nonnos), a native of Panopolis (Akhmim) in the Egyptian Thebaid, probably lived at the end of the 4th or the beginning of the 5th century AD. He produced the Dionysiaca, an epic tale of the god Dionysus, a paraphrase of the Gospel of John...

Medieval epics (500-1500)

This article is about the epic poem. ... Waldere is the conventional title of two Old English fragments from a lost epic poem, discovered in 1860 by E. C. Werlauff, Librarian of the Danish Royal Library at Copenhagen, and still preserved in that library. ... This article is entitled For other uses of David, see David (disambiguation). ... The Armenian language (, IPA: — , conventional short form ) is an Indo-European language spoken by the Armenian people. ... The Bhagavata Purana (sometimes rendered as Bhagavatha Purana), also known as the Srimad Bhagavatam, written c. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Shâhnameh Shāhnāmé, or Shāhnāma (Persian: )(alternative spellings are Shahnama, Shahnameh, Shahname, Shah-Nama, etc. ... The beliefs and practices of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian Plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Ho-tien, China), form Persian mythology. ... Persia redirects here. ... The Sassanid Empire or Sassanian Dynasty (Persian: []) is the name used for the third Iranian dynasty and the second Persian Empire (226–651). ... Waltharius, a Latin poem founded on German popular tradition, relates the exploits of the west Gothic hero Walter of Aquitaine. ... Walter of Aquitaine is a legendary king of the Visigoths. ... The Battle of Maldon took place in 991 near Maldon beside the River Blackwater in Essex, England, during the reign of Ethelred the Unready. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... Ruodlieb, a romance in Latin verse by an unknown German poet who flourished about 1030. ... Digenis Acritas (Greek: Διγενής Ακρίτας) is the most famous epic poem that emerged out of the 12th century Byzantine Empire, following the Acritic songs tradition. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Song of Roland (La Chanson de Roland) is an 11th century Old French epic poem about the Battle of Roncevaux Pass (or Roncesvalles) fought by Roland of the Brittany Marches and his fellow paladins. ... Eight phases of The Song of Roland in one picture. ... The Epic of King Gesar is the premier epic poem of Tibet and much of Central Asia. ... The Tibetan language is spoken primarily by the Tibetan people who live across a wide area of eastern Central Asia bordering South Asia, as well as by large number of Tibetan refugees all over the world. ... A traditional Kyrgyz Manaschi performing part of the epic poem at a yurt camp in Karakol The Epic of Manas is a traditional epic poem of the Kyrgyz people and the name of the epics eponymous hero. ... For the language spoken by this ethnic group, see Kyrgyz language. ... The Knight in the Panthers Skin (Vepkhis Tkaosani in Georgian) is a well-known epic poem written in the 12th century (though the earliest surviving copy dates to the 16th century) by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli, who was a Prince, the Treasurer (Mechurchletukhutsesi) of Queen of Georgia Tamar. ... Shota Rustaveli, an artistic notion of the poet by Sergo Kobuladze (1937). ... Alexandreis, sive Gesta Alexandri Magni (The Deeds of Alexander the Great) is a medieval Latin epic poem by Walter of Châtillon, a 12th century French writer and theologian. ... Walter of Châtillon (Latin Gualterus de Castellione) was a 12th-century French writer and theologian who wrote in the Latin language. ... Venus and Cupid observe the destruction of Troy: frontispiece of the 1702 edition of Dictys, Dares and Joseph of Exeter De bello Troiano (On the Trojan War) is an epic poem in Latin, written around 1183 by the English poet Joseph of Exeter. ... Antiocheis is an epic poem by Joseph of Exeter, written in Latin soon after the year 1190, when Joseph returned to England from the Third Crusade on the death of his friend and fellow Crusader, Baldwin of Exeter, archbishop of Canterbury. ... Joseph of Exeter was a twelfth century Latin poet from Exeter, England. ... Carmen de Prodicione Guenonis is an anonymous poem in medieval Latin, written in the first half of the 12th century. ... Architrenius is a medieval allegorical and satirical poem in hexameters by Johannes de Hauvilla (also known as Johannes de Altavilla or Jean de Hauteville). ... John of Hauville (also known as Johannes de Hauvilla, Johannes de Altavilla, John of Hauteville and Jean de Hauteville) was a moralist and satirical poet of the 12th century (flourished about 1184). ... The enthronement of emperor Henry VI, an illumination from the Liber ad honorem Augusti, 1196 The Liber ad honorem Augusti sive de rebus Siculis (Book in honour of the Emperor, or on Sicilian affairs; also called Carmen de motibus Siculis, Poem on the Sicilian revolt) is an illustrated narrative epic... Self-portrait, the tonsured poeta himself, in Liber ad honorem Augusti, 1196. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Henry VI (November 1165 – 28 September 1197) was King of Germany from 1190 to 1197, Holy Roman Emperor from 1191 to 1197 and King of Sicily from 1194 to 1197. ... The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... Thor, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. ... Brut, about the mythic Brutus of Troy, is a Middle English poem compiled and recast by the priest Layamon. ... Layamon, or Laȝamon (using the archaic letter yogh), was a poet of the early 13th century, whose Brut (c. ... The Chanson de la Croisade Albigeoise or Song of the Albigensian Crusade is an epic poem in medieval Occitan (Provençal). ... Occitan (IPA AmE: ), known also as Lenga dòc or Langue doc (native name: occitan [1], lenga dòc [2]; native nickname: la lenga nòstra [3] i. ... Sundiata Keita or Sunjata Keita (1190? - 1255?) is a semi-historical hero of the Mandinka people of West Africa and is celebrated in the Epic of Sundiata as founder of the Mali Empire. ... A page from the original codex, starting from line 1922 El Cantar del Mio Cid is the oldest preserved Spanish cantar de gesta. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... De triumphis ecclesiae is a Latin epic in elegiac metre, written c. ... Johannes de Garlandia (fl. ... For the Danish band, see Parzival (band). ... Portrait of Wolfram from the Codex Manesse. ... Cursor Mundi (Latin, Runner of the World) is a lengthy religious history written around 1300 AD by an anonymous cleric. ... Anonymous redirects here. ... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino... Dante redirects here. ... Africa is an epic poem in Latin by the 14th century Italian poet Petrarch (Francesco Petrarca). ... From the c. ... The Tale of the Heike (Japanese: 平家物語, Heike monogatari) is an epic account of the struggle between the Minamoto and Taira clans for control of Japan at the end of the 12th century. ... The Alliterative Morte Arthure is a 4346 line Middle English poem, retelling the latter part of the legend of King Arthur. ... Orlando Innamorato is an epic poem written by the Italian Renaissance author Matteo Maria Boiardo. ... Matteo Maria Boiardo (c. ...

Modern epics (from 1500)

Ruggiero Rescuing Angelica by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. ... Statue of the poet in Reggio Emilia. ... Front of the first edition of Os Lusíadas Os Lusíadas, pron. ... Monument to Luís de Camões, Lisbon Luís Vaz de Camões (pron. ... La Araucana is an epic poem in Spanish about the Spanish conquest of Chile, by Alonso de Ercilla; it is also known in English as The Araucaniad. ... Alonso de Ercilla y Zúñiga (Madrid August 7, 1533 – November 29, 1595 in Madrid), Spanish nobleman, soldier and poet. ... Jerusalem Delivered (La Gerusalemme liberata) 1580) is a baroque epic poem by Torquato Tasso which tells the (largely fictionalized) story of the First Crusade in which Christians knights, lead by Godfrey of Bouillon, battle Muslims in order to raise the siege of Jerusalem. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sri Ramacharit Manas. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... GosvāmÄ« TulsÄ«dās (1532-1623; DevanāgarÄ«: तुलसीदास) was an Awadhi poet and philosopher. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... Drayton, 1628 Michael Drayton (1563 – December 23, 1631) was an English poet who came to prominence in the Elizabethan era. ... Una and the Lion by Briton Rivière The Faerie Queene is an English epic poem by Edmund Spenser, published first in three books in 1590, and later in six books in 1596. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Drayton, 1628 Michael Drayton (1563 – December 23, 1631) was an English poet who came to prominence in the Elizabethan era. ... Miklós Zrinyi, the author. ... Nicholas Zrinski (1620-1664) Nikola Zrinski or Miklós Zrínyi (Croatian: Nikola Zrinski, Hungarian: Zrínyi Miklós; January 5, 1620–November 18, 1664) was a Croatian and Hungarian warrior, statesman and poet, member of the Zrinski noble family. ... For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Paradise Regaind is a poem by the 17th century English poet John Milton, published in 1671. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Sir Richard Blackmore (c. ... Sir Richard Blackmore (c. ... Sir Richard Blackmore (c. ... Sir Richard Blackmore (c. ... For other uses, see Voltaire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Voltaire (disambiguation). ... Sir Richard Blackmore (c. ... UtendÌ i wa Tambuka or Utenzi wa Tambuka[1] (The Story of Tambuka), also known as Kyuo kya HerekÌ£ali (the book of Heraclius), is an epic poem in the Swahili language dated 1728. ... Richard Glover (1712 - November 25, 1785), English poet, son of Richard Glover, a Hamburg merchant, was born in London. ... William Wilkie (1721 - 1772), poet, born in Linlithgowshire, son of a farmer, and educated at Edinburgh, entered the Church, and became minister of Ratho, Midlothian, in 1756, and Professor of Natural Philosophy at St. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oisín. ... James Macpherson (October 27, 1736–February 17, 1796), was a Scottish poet, known as the translator of the Ossian cycle of poems (also known as the Oisín cycle). ... Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire or the Lament for Art Ó Laoghaire is an Irish keen, or dirge written by his wife Eibhlín Dubh Ní Chonaill. ... Eibhlín Dubh Ní Chonaill also Eileen O Connell, was an Irish noblewoman and poet, c. ... Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock (IPA: ; July 2, 1724 – March 14, 1803) was a German poet. ... Mikhail Matveyevich Kheraskov (1733-1807) was regarded as the most important Russian poet by Catherine the Great and her contemporaries. ... Mikhail Matveyevich Kheraskov (1733-1807) was regarded as the most important Russian poet by Catherine the Great and her contemporaries. ... Richard Glover (1712 - November 25, 1785), English poet, son of Richard Glover, a Hamburg merchant, was born in London. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... Joel Barlow (March 24, 1754-December 24, 1812), American poet and politician, born in Redding, Fairfield County, Connecticut. ... For other persons named William Blake, see William Blake (disambiguation). ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Endymion may be: Fictional character: Endymion (mythology), Greek shepherd A form of Mamoru Chiba in the Sailor Moon series Titled work: Endymion (poem), by Keats Endymion (Longfellow), poem Endymion, 1996 science fiction novel within Dan Simmonss Hyperion Cantos: Endymion Endymion (Disraeli), 1880 novel Endymion (play), by John Lyly Astronomy... Keats redirects here. ... Hyperion is an uncompleted epic poem by 19th-century English Romantic poet John Keats. ... Hyperion The Hyperion Cantos is a tetralogy of novels by Dan Simmons. ... Keats redirects here. ... Le Brun de Charmettes Philippe-Alexandre Born in Bordeaux (France) in 1785, historian and administrator, was attached to the Council of State in 1810 and became prefect of the Haute-Saône in 1830. ... Byrons Don Juan (Penguin Classics version) Don Juan is a long narrative poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan. ... Byron redirects here. ... Picking mushrooms. ... Adam Mickiewicz. ... Ivan Mažuranić (1814-1890) was a Croatian poet, linguist and politician—probably the most important figure in Croatias cultural life in the mid-19th century. ... The Kalevala is an epic poem which the Finn Elias Lönnrot compiled from Finnish and Karelian folklore in the 19th century. ... Elias Lönnrot ( ) (April 9, 1802 – March 19, 1884) was a Finnish philologist and collector of traditional Finnish oral poetry. ... Finnish mythology has many features that it shares with other Finnic mythologies, like the Estonian mythology, and also elements similar with non-Finnic neighbours, especially the the Balts and the Scandinavians. ... Illustration to Kalevipoeg by Oskar Kallis Kalevipoeg is an epic poem by Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald held to be the Estonian national epic. ... Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald (born December 26, 1803 Jömper/Jõepere manor near Sankt Katharinen/Kadrina, Virumaa/Wierland county - died August 25, 1882 Tartu) was an Estonian writer and physician. ... // Estonian Mythology is a complex of myths belonging to the folk heritage of Estonians. ... The Prelude is an autobiographical poem in blank verse by the English poet William Wordsworth. ... Wordsworth redirects here. ... Statue of Hiawatha carrying Minnehaha at Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... La Fin de Satan (The End of Satan) is a work of poetry Victor Hugo wrote in 1886. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... La Légende des siècles is a series of poems by Victor Hugo that recounts mans struggle throughout history. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Martín Fierro is an epic poem by the Argentinean writer José Hernández. ... For the baseball player, see José Hernández. ... Clarel: 1991 Single-volume Hardcover edn. ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ... The City of Dreadful Night is a long poem by the Scottish poet James B.V. Thomson, published in 1880 in a book entitled Thomson, who sometimes used the pseudonym Bysshe Vanolis — in honour of Percy Bysshe Shelley and Novalis — was a thorough pessimist, suffering from lifelong melancholia and clinical... James Thomson (1834 - 1882) was a Scottish poet, best known for his long poem The City of Dreadful Night (1874). ... Jacint Verdaguer. ... For other uses, see LāčplÄ“sis (disambiguation). ... Andrejs Pumpurs (b. ... Gjergi Fishta (October 23, 1871-December 30, 1940) was an Albanian Franciscan friar, a poet, and a translator. ... The Ballad of the White Horse is a poem by G K Chesterton about the exploits of the Saxon King Alfred the Great, published in 1911 AD. Despite being written in ballad form, the work is also considered an epic poem. ... G.K. Chesterton Gilbert Keith Chesterton (May 29, 1874 – June 14, 1936) was an English writer of the early 20th century. ... Fernando Pessoa Fernando António Nogueira de Seabra Pessoa (pron. ... Fernando Pessoa Fernando António Nogueira de Seabra Pessoa (pron. ... Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893-August 14, 1961) was a poet, sculptor, painter and author of fantasy, horror and science fiction short stories. ... Savitri is a 24,000 verse poem by Sri Aurobindo, completed shortly before his death in 1950. ... ... . Jan Křesadlo was the primary pseudonym used by Václav Jaroslav Karel Pinkava (December 9, 1926 in Prague - August 13, 1995 in Colchester), a Czech psychologist who was also a prizewinning novelist and poet. ... Odyssey, poem of Greek writer, poet and philosopher Nikos Kazantzakis, the largest of his works. ... Nikos Kazantzakis (Greek: Νίκος Καζαντζάκης) (February 18, 1883, Heraklion, Crete, Greece - October 26, 1957, Freiburg, Germany), author of poems, novels, essays, plays, and travel books, was arguably the most important and most translated Greek writer and philosopher of the 20th century. ... Ezra Pound in 1913 The Cantos by Ezra Pound is a long, incomplete poem in 120 sections, each of which is a canto. ... Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (Hailey, Idaho Territory, United States, October 30, 1885 – Venice, Italy, November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to-mid 20th century poetry. ... A Cycle of the West is a collection of five epic poems (called Songs) written and published at various times over a nearly thirty year span by John G. Neihardt. ... Johnathan (John) Gneisenau Neihardt (January 8, 1881 - November 24, 1973) was an American author of poetry and prose, an amateur historian and ethnographer, and a philosopher of the Great Plains. ... The cover of the 1978 edition of Zukofskys long poem A. Louis Zukofsky (January 23, 1904 – May 12, 1978) was one of the most important second-generation American modernist poets. ... Paterson is a poem by influential modern American poet William Carlos Williams. ... William Carlos Williams Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. ... Hugh John Lofting (Maidenhead, Berkshire, England January 14, 1886 - Topanga, California September 26, 1947) was a British author, trained as a civil engineer, who created the character of Doctor Dolittle - one of the classics of childrens literature. ... Charles Olson (27 December 1910 – 10 January 1970) was an important 2nd generation American modernist poet who was a crucial link between earlier figures like Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams and the New American poets, a rubric which includes the New York School, the Black Mountain School, the Beat... Aniara is a poem of science fiction written by the Swedish Nobel laureate Harry Martinson in 1956. ... Harry Martinson (May 6, 1904 – February 11, 1978) was an author and poet. ... Melvin Beaunorus Tolson (February 6, 1898–August 29, 1966) was an American Modernist poet, educator, columnist, and politician. ... Young Gary Snyder, on one of his early book covers Gary Snyder (born May 8, 1930) is an American poet (originally, often associated with the Beat Generation), essayist, lecturer, and environmental activist. ... The cover of The Changing Light at Sandover shows the ballroom of James Merrills childhood home in the 1930s The Changing Light At Sandover is a 560-page poem by James Merrill (1926-1995). ... poet James Merrill, age 30, in a 1957 publicity photograph for The Seraglio James Ingram Merrill (March 3, 1926 - February 6, 1995) was a Pulitzer Prize winning American writer, increasingly regarded as one of the most important 20th century poets in the English language. ... Omeros is a 1990 book of poetry by Derek Walcott. ... Derek Alton Walcott (born January 23, 1930) is a West Indies poet, playwright, writer and visual artist who writes mainly in English. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Mwatabu S. Okantah (b. ...

Other epics

David Jones CH (November 1, 1895-1974) was both an artist and one of the most important first generation British modernist poets. ... Pablo Neruda (July 12, 1904 – September 23, 1973) was the penname and, later, legal name of the Chilean writer and communist politician Ricardo Eliecer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto. ... Four Quartets is the name given to four related poems by T. S. Eliot, collected and republished in book form in 1943. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Der Ring des Nibelungen, (The Ring of the Nibelung), is a cycle of four epic music dramas by the German composer Richard Wagner. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Parsifal is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Leslie Allan Murray (born 17 October 1938) is an Australian poet and critic. ...

References

See Also

Poetry Portal

Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... A Duma (Дума in Ukrainian) is an epic poem of 16th and 17th century Cossack Ukraine. ... Bylina (Russian: были́на, also Byliny and Stariny) is a traditional epic, heroic narrative poetry of early East Slavs of Kievan Rus, the tradition continued in Russia and Ukraine. ... Though an abundance of historical reminiscence and legend lay in the storehouse of Jewish literature, none of it was built into epic poems until relatively recently. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... Songs of Serbian epic poetry rarely, if ever, rhyme, but they are easy to remember as each line has exactly ten syllables and caesura after fourth syllable. ... Yukar are Ainu sagas that form a long, rich tradition of oral literature. ... World folk-epics are those epics which are not just literary masterpieces but also an integral part of the weltanschauung of a people. ... The monomyth (often referred to as the heros journey) is a description of a basic pattern found in many narratives from around the world. ... A national epic is an epic poem or similar work which seeks or is believed to capture and express the essence or spirit of a particular nation; not necessarily a nation-state, but at least an ethnic or linguistic group with aspirations to independence or autonomy. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... This article is about the muse. ... Väinämöinen, hero from the Finnish national epic Kalevala, fights to free the Sampo from the clutches of the evil Louhi An epic hero is a larger-than-life figure from a history or legend, usually favored by or even partially descended from deities, but aligned more closely... Alpamysh, also spelled as Alp-amish or Alpamish (Turkish: Alpamis, Kazakh Cyrillic script: Алпамыс, Bashkir: Алпамыша и Барсын-хылуу, Russian: Алпамыш, Azerbaijani: Alpamıs, Kazan Tatar: Алпамша), is an ancient Turkic epic or dastan — ornate oral history, generally set in verse — and one of the most important examples of the Turkic oral literature of Central Asia. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Michael Meyer, The Bedford Introduction to Literature, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2005, p2128. ISBN 0-312-41242-8
  2. ^ "epic". The Columbia Encyclopedia (6). (2004). New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved on 2007-09-25. 
  3. ^ According to that article, world folk epics are those which are not just literary masterpieces but also an integral part of the world view of a people, originally oral, later written down by one or several authors.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Masterpiece (disambiguation). ... A world view (or worldview) is a term calqued from the German word Weltanschauung ( ) Welt is the German word for world, and Anschauung is the German word for view or outlook. It is a concept fundamental to German philosophy and epistemology and refers to a wide world perception. ...

External links

  • WorldChronicle.net
  • Clay Sanskrit Library publishes classical Indian literature, including the Mahabharata and Ramayana, with facing-page text and translation. Also offers searchable corpus and downloadable materials.
  • Humanities Index has notes on epic poetry.

Bibliography

  • Jan de Vries: Heroic Song and Heroic Legend ISBN 0-405-10566-5
  • Cornel Heinsdorff: Christus, Nikodemus und die Samaritanerin bei Juvencus. Mit einem Anhang zur lateinischen Evangelienvorlage, Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte 67, Berlin/New York 2003, ISBN 3-11-017851-6

  Results from FactBites:
 
Notes on Heroic Poetry: The Primary and Secondary Epic (1608 words)
Epic conventions include the simile, the in-medias-res opening, the invocation, the epic question, the epithet, the climactic confrontation between mighty adversaries, and hand-to-hand combat; these were established by Homer and emulated by Virgil.
Since epics were composed to honour the deeds of heroic ancestors, such poems often have an aristocratic bias: peasants and servants (unless of aristocratic birth) are insignificant.
An epic or heroic poem falls into one of two patterns, both established by Homer: the structure (and allegory to life) may be either war or journey, and the hero may be on a quest (as Odysseus is) or pursuing conquest (as Achilles is).
Epic poetry - LoveToKnow 1911 (1705 words)
Did we possess them, it is almost certain that we could speak with more assurance as to the scope of epic poetry in the days of oral tradition, and could understand more clearly what sort of ballads in hexameter it was which rhapsodes took round from court to court.
Teutonic epic poetry deals, as a rule, with legends founded on the history of Germany in the 4th, 5th and 6th centuries, and in particular with such heroes as Ermanaric, Attila and Theodoric.
Professor Ker's analysis of its merits may be taken as typical of all that is best in the vast body of epic which comes between the antique models, which were unknown to the medieval poets, and the artificial epics of a later time which were founded on vast ideal themes, in imitation of the ancients.
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