FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Eos" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel
Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel

Eos ("dawn") was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of Oceanus, the Ocean that surrounds the world, to herald her brother Helios, the sun. As the dawn goddess, she opened the gates of heaven (with "rosy fingers") so that Helios could ride his chariot across the sky every day. In Homer (Iliad viii.1; xxiv.695), her yellow robe is embroidered or woven with flowers (Odyssey vi:48 etc); rosy-fingered and with golden arms, she is pictured on Attic vases as a supernaturally beautiful woman, crowned with a tiara or diadem and with the large white-feathered wings of a bird. The worship of the dawn as a goddess is inherited from Indo-European times; Eos is cognate to Latin Aurora and to Vedic Ushas. Evelyn De Morgan (British, 1850-1919) Eos Painting Date: 1895 Medium: Oil on canvas Location: Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, USA This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Evelyn De Morgan (British, 1850-1919) Eos Painting Date: 1895 Medium: Oil on canvas Location: Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, USA This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Evelyn de Morgan (1855-1919) was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter. ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture A goddess is a female deity, in contrast with a male deity known as a god. Many cultures have goddesses. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... Helios in his chariot In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helios or Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... Homer (Greek: , HómÄ“ros) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... This article is about a type of crown called a diadem; for alternate meanings, see Diadem. ... The Proto-Indo-Europeans are the hypothetical speakers of the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European language, a prehistoric people of the Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Aurora, by Guercino, 1621-23 (ceiling fresco in the Casino Ludovisi, Rome), a classic example of Baroque illusionistic painting Aurora was the ancient Roman equivalent of Eos, the ancient Greek goddess of the dawn. ... This article discusses the historical religious practices in the Vedic time period; see Dharmic religions for details of contemporary religious practices. ... Ushas (उषः úṣas-), Sanskrit for dawn, is the chief goddess (sometimes imagined as several goddesses, Dawns) exalted in the Rigveda. ...


Quintus Smyrnaeus pictured her exulting in her heart over the radiant horses (Lampos and Phaithon) that drew her chariot, amidst the bright-haired Horai, the feminine Hours, climbing the arc of heaven and scattering sparks of fire (1.48). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ...


She is most often associated with her Homeric epithet "rosy-fingered" (rhododactylos), but Homer also calls her Eos Erigeneia: An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ...

"That brightest of stars appeared, Eosphoros, that most often heralds the light of early-rising Dawn (Eos Erigeneia)."
Odyssey 13.93

And Hesiod: "And after these Erigeneia ["Early-born"] bore the star Eosphoros ("Dawn-bringer"), and the gleaming stars with which heaven is crowned." Henry Longfellow wrote an epic poem called The Wreck of the Hesperus. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... Henry Longfellow wrote an epic poem called The Wreck of the Hesperus. ...

Theogony 378-382

Thus Eos, preceded by the Morning Star, is seen as the genetrix of all the stars; her tears are considered to have created the morning dew. Morning Star may refer to: The planet Venus, also called the evening star Morning star (weapon), a spiked mace in religion: Jesus, as a figurative name used in the New Testament John Wycliffe, the English theologian, reformer and bible translator, as The Morning Star of the Reformation Lucifer, the fallen...


Eos was the daughter of Hyperion and Theia (or Pallas and Styx) and sister of Helios the sun and Selene the moon, "who shine upon all that are on earth and upon the deathless Gods who live in the wide heaven" Hesiod told in Theogony (371-374). The generation of Titans preceded all the familiar deities of Olympus, who supplanted them. In Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate being... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... For other meanings of Pallas, see Pallas (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Styx (Στυξ) is the name of a river which formed the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, Hades. ... Helios in his chariot In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helios or Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... Roman sculpture of the torch-bearing moon goddess Luna, or Diana Lucifera (Diana Bringer of Light), who was equated with the Greek Selene (Vatican Museums) In Greek mythology, Selene (Σελήνη, moon; Modern Greek pronunciation IPA: ) was an archaic lunar deity and the daughter of the titans Hyperion and Theia. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived...


Eos was free with her favors and had many consorts, both among the generation of Titans and among the handsomest mortals. With Astraios, she bore all the winds and stars/planets. Her passion for the Titan Orion was unrequited. Eos kidnapped Cephalus, Clitus, Ganymede, and Tithonus to be her lovers. Eos' most faithful consort was Tithonus, from whose couch the poets imagine her arising. When Zeus stole Ganymede from her to be his cup-bearer, she asked for Tithonus to be made immortal, but forgot to ask for eternal youth. Tithonus indeed lived forever but grew more and more ancient, eventually turning into a cricket. Aeolus (or Aiolos, Αἴολος) in Greek Mythology was the Keeper of the Winds. ... An engraving of Orion from Johann Bayers Uranometria, 1603 (US Naval Observatory Library) In Greek mythology, Orion was not truly a great huntsman but a poor one, who was set amongst the stars as the constellation of the same name. ... Cephalus and Aurora, by Nicolas Poussin (c. ... In Greek mythology, Clitus(Κλείτος) was: 1) One of the sons of Egypt (Αίγυπτος), murdered by the Danaede Clite (Κλείτη). 2) A Trojan, son of Pisenoros (Πεισή&#957... The Rape of Ganymede, by Rubens In Greek mythology, Ganymede, or closer to the Greek Ganymede the great man that leads (in Greek — Γανυμήδης, GanumÄ“dÄ“s) was a divine hero whose homeland was the Troad. ... In Greek mythology, Tithonus was Eos lover. ... In Greek mythology, Tithonus was Eos lover. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is...

Eos and the slain Memnon on an Attic red-figure cup, ca. 490–480 BCE, the so-called "Memnon Pietà" found at Capua (Louvre)
Eos and the slain Memnon on an Attic red-figure cup, ca. 490–480 BCE, the so-called "Memnon Pietà" found at Capua (Louvre)

Tithonus and Eos had two sons, Memnon and Emathion. Memnon fought among the Trojans in the Trojan War and was slain. Her image with the dead Memnon across her knees, like Thetis with the dead Achilles and Isis with the dead Osiris, are icons that inspired the Christian Pietà art. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1790x1740, 1507 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Eos Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1790x1740, 1507 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Eos Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Capua is a city in the province of Caserta, (Campania, Italy) situated 25 km (16 mi) north of Napoli, on the northeastern edge of the Campanian plain. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Memnon may refer to three men: Memnon (mythology), in Greek mythology Memnon (Fantasy Literature), in the Forgotten Realms setting Memnon of Heraclea was a Greek historian. ... In Greek mythology, King Emathion of Arabia was a son of Tithonus and Eos. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles (also Akhilleus or Achilleus) (Ancient Greek: ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... This article discusses the ancient goddess. ... For other uses, see Osiris (disambiguation). ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A pietà (pl. ...


Eos kidnapped Cephalus when he was hunting. Although Cephalus was already married to Procris, he had a relationship with Eos for some time and she bore him three sons, but he then began pining for Procris, causing a disgruntled Eos to return him to her - and put a curse on them. Cephalus accidentally killed Procris some time later after he mistook her for an animal while hunting; Procris, a jealous wife, was spying on him and heard him singing to the wind, "Aura", but thought he was serenading his ex-lover Aurora (i.e. Eos). Cephalus and Aurora, by Nicolas Poussin (c. ... The Death of Procris, by Piero di Cosimo (c. ...


In the more restrictive Hellenic world, Apollodorus, a later Greek poet, claimed, in an anecdote rather than a myth, that her disgraceful abandon was a torment from Aphrodite, who found her on the couch with Ares. (Apollodorus, Library 1.27). Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Αφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... In Greek mythology, Ares (in Greek: - Aris (Battle Strife))[1] is the son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. ...


Her Roman equivalent was Aurora, her Etruscan equivalent was Thesan. The Dawn became associated in Roman cult with Matuta; later known as Mater Matuta she was also associated with the sea harbors and ports. She had a temple of the Forum Boarium. On June 11, the Matralia was celebrated at that temple in honor of Mater Matuta; this festival was only for women in their first marriage. Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Aurora, by Guercino, 1621-23 (ceiling fresco in the Casino Ludovisi, Rome), a classic example of Baroque illusionistic painting Aurora was the ancient Roman equivalent of Eos, the ancient Greek goddess of the dawn. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... In Etruscan mythology, Thesan was the goddess of the dawn and was associated with the generation of life. ... In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of dawn. ... The Forum Boarium was the cattle market of ancient Rome. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ...


With Zeus, Eos had a daughter named Ersa. In Greek mythology, Ersa was the goddess of dew and a daughter of Zeus and Selene. ...


Consorts/Children

Eos, goddess of dawn, (William-Adolphe Bouguereau - Dawn (1881))
  1. With Astraios
    1. Boreas
    2. Eurus
    3. Eosphoros
    4. Hesperos
    5. Notus
    6. All the stars/planets
    7. Zephyrus
  2. Tithonus
    1. Emathion
    2. Memnon
  3. Cephalus
    1. Phaëton
    2. Tithonos
  4. With Zeus
    1. Ersa
    2. Carae

Download high resolution version (533x1063, 112 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: William-Adolphe Bouguereau gallery Categories: Paintings containing nudity ... Download high resolution version (533x1063, 112 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: William-Adolphe Bouguereau gallery Categories: Paintings containing nudity ... William-Adolphe Bouguereau, self-portrait (1886). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Aeolus (or Aiolos, Αἴολος) in Greek Mythology was the Keeper of the Winds. ... There was one person and one god known as Boreas in Greek mythology. ... Eurus, or Euros was a god in Greek mythology, one of the Anemoi the Winds, representing the unlucky east wind that brought warmth and rain. ... Henry Longfellow wrote an epic poem called The Wreck of the Hesperus. ... In Greek mythology, Hesperos (Greek (The Evening Star), sometimes Latinized as Hesperus) and Heosphoros (Morning Star) Latinized as Eosphorus are sons of the dawn goddess Eos (Roman Aurora), by starry Astraios. ... In Greek mythology, Notus was the south wind, brother of Eurus, Boreas and Zephyrus (together, the brothers are the Anemoi, the Winds). ... Zephyr and Hyakinth; Attic red figure cup from Tarquinia, circa 480 BCE. Boston Museum of Fine Arts. ... In Greek mythology, Tithonus was Eos lover. ... In Greek mythology, King Emathion of Arabia was a son of Tithonus and Eos. ... In Greek mythology, Memnon was an Ethiopian king and son of Tithonus and Eos. ... Cephalus and Aurora, by Nicolas Poussin (c. ... The fall of Phaeton, Johann Liss, beginning of 17th century. ... In Greek mythology, Tithonos was a son of Eos and Cephalus. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... In Greek mythology, Ersa was the goddess of dew and a daughter of Zeus and Selene. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Eos
  • Theoi Project, Eos many references from Greek and Roman written sources, from Homer to Late Antiquity.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - Eos - Encyclopedia Article (364 words)
Eos was the name of one of Helios horses in Greek mythology.
Eos kidnapped Cephalus when he was hunting but he refused to be unfaithful to Procris, his wife.
Eos kidnapped Ganymede, Clitus and Tithonus to be her lovers.
Eos - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (755 words)
Eos ("dawn") was, in Greek mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of Oceanus, the Ocean that surrounds the world, to herald her brother Helios, the sun.
Eos was the daughter of Hyperion and Theia (or Pallas and Styx) and sister of Helios the sun and Selene the moon, "who shine upon all that are on earth and upon the deathless Gods who live in the wide heaven" Hesiod told in Theogony (371-374).
Eos was free with her favors and had many consorts, both among the generation of Titans and among the handsomest mortals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m