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Encyclopedia > Entertainment Weekly
'Entertainment Weekly'
Editor Rick Tetzeli
Categories entertainment
Frequency weekly

Publisher Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Time Inc.
First Issue 1990
Country Flag of United States United States
Language English
Website ew.com
ISSN unknown

Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. in the United States which covers movies, television, music, Broadway stage productions, books, and popular culture. Time Inc. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Time Inc. ... Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ...


Unlike celebrity-focused publications US Weekly, People, and In Touch Weekly, EW's primary concentration is on entertainment media and critical reviews. Unlike Variety and The Hollywood Reporter, which are aimed at industry insiders, EW targets a more general audience, particularly young people and women.[citation needed] Its original TV advertising soliciting pre-publication subscribers portrayed it as a consumer guide to popular culture ("the post-modern Farmer's Almanac"). The magazine features celebrities on the cover and addresses topics such as TV ratings, movie grosses, production costs, concert ticket sales, ad budgets, and in-depth articles about scheduling, producers, showrunners, etc. While the television program Entertainment Tonight established that there was public interest in behind-the-scenes coverage of the entertainment industry, it took Time, Inc. (then called Time Life) to prove that Americans were interested enough to read about such issues in a weekly publication.[citation needed] The magazine publishes several "double issues" each year (usually in January, May, June and/or August) which are available on newsstands for two weeks; because the magazine numbers its issues sequentially, it counts each double issue as "two" issues so that it can fulfill its marketing claim of 52 issues per year for subscribers. Us Weekly (a. ... In Touch Weekly is a female magazine. ... Variety is a daily magazine for the entertainment industry. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Entertainment Tonight is a daily television entertainment news show that is syndicated by CBS Paramount Domestic Television throughout the United States, Canada, on the Nine Network in Australia and on UBC Inside in Thailand. ...


The first edition of Entertainment Weekly was published in 1990 and featured singer k.d. lang on the first cover. The title word "entertainment" was not capitalized on the cover until mid-1992 and has remained so since. By 2003, the magazine's weekly circulation averaged 1,700,000 copies per week (Source: Magazine Publishers of America). In March 2006, managing editor Rick Tetzeli oversaw an overhaul of EW's graphics and layout to reflect a more modern look.[citation needed] The website (EW.com), under managing editor Jay Woodruff, provides users with daily content, original video programming, entertainment exclusives, and serves as an archive for past magazine interviews, columns, and photos. Kathryn Dawn Lang, OC (born November 2, 1961), best known by the stage name k. ...

Contents

Typical content

Cover for the February 16, 1990, cover of Entertainment Weekly; the first issue. Featured on the cover is k.d. lang.
Cover for the February 16, 1990, cover of Entertainment Weekly; the first issue. Featured on the cover is k.d. lang.

Entertainment Weekly follows a typical magazine format by featuring a letters to the editor and table of contents in the first few pages, while also featuring advertisements. While many ads are unrelated to the entertainment industry, the majority of ads are typically related to up-and-coming television, film, or music events. Image File history File links Firstew. ... Image File history File links Firstew. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... A letter to the editor (sometimes abbreviated LTTE) is a letter sent to the editors of a publication or periodical about materials that have appeared in the publication or issues of concern to the readership, usually intended for publication. ... A table of contents is an organized list of titles for quick information on the summary of a book or document and quickly directing the reader to any topic. ...


News and Notes

This is a section of smaller articles about dealing with recent events. The whole section typically runs 8 to 10 pages long, and features several specific recurring sections:

  • The Hit List, written each week by critic Scott Brown, highlights ten major events, with short comedic commentaries by Brown. Typically, there will be some continuity to the commentaries. This column was originally written by Jim Mullen and featured 20 events each week, and an abbreviated version was later written by Dalton Ross.
  • The Deal Report, written by Michelle Kung, highlights business deal and signings that have recently taken place. The section is separated by medium, but within each section separate events are separated only by ellipses. There are also typically a number of headshots of persons under discussion, as well as one full body shot.
  • The Fever Chart is a small infographic showing six events, ranked on their impact by temperature. This feature is rarely seen as of late.
  • The Style Sheet is a full page devoted to celebrity style.
  • The Shaw Report is a small sidebar feature, written by Jessica Shaw, that rates several trios of related trends: one that is "in," one that is "five minutes ago" (i.e., recently fashionable but no longer so), and one that is "out." This feature is unique for EW in that it is not directly related to the entertainment industry.
  • The Monitor is a single page devoted to major events in celebrity lives. It is very tabloid-like in nature, highlighting events like weddings, illnesses, arrestes, court appearances, and deaths. Deaths of major celebrity are typically detailed in a full page obituary titled Legacy. This feature is nearly identical to sister publication People Magazine's "Passages" feature.

A page is one side of a leaf of paper. ... Ellipses is the plural form of either of 2 words in the English language: Ellipse Ellipsis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A headshot is a photograph distributed to promote a person, especially in the case of actors and actresses. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The term fashion usually applies to a prevailing mode of expression, but quite often applies to a personal mode of expression that may or may not apply to all. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Obituary for World War I death An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper, written or commissioned by the newspaper, and usually including a short biography. ... People, a weekly magazine of celebrity and popular culture news, debuted on February 27, 1974. ...

Feature articles

There are typically four to six major articles within the middle pages of the magazine. These articles are most commonly interviews, but there are also narrative articles as well as lists. Feature articles tend to focus mostly on movies and television and less on books and stage. In the magazine's history, there have only been a few cover stories (John Grisham, Stephen King) devoted to authors. There has never been an EW cover solely devoted to theater. interview An interview is a conversation between two or more people where questions are asked to obtain information about the interviewee. ... John Ray Grisham Jr. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ...


The Must List

This is a one-page section highlighting ten things (books, movies, songs, etc.) that the staff loves from the week.


Reviews

There are seven sections of reviews in the back pages of each issue (together encompass up to one half of the magazine's pages). In addition to reviews, each reviews section has a top sellers list, as well as numerous sidebars with interviews or small features. Unlike a number of European magazines that give their ratings with a number of stars (with normally 4 or 5 stars for the best review), EW grades the reviews academic-style, so that the highest reviews will get a letter grade of "A" and the lowest reviews get an "F," with plus or minus graduations in between assigned to each letter except F. Sidebar has several distict meanings: Sidebar in publishing Sidebar in law Sidebar as a piece of computer software. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ...


The sections are:

  • Movies, color-coded in red, will typically feature all of the major releases for that weekend, as well as several independent and foreign films that have also been released. Lisa Schwarzbaum and Owen Gleiberman are the two primary movie critics, with occasional reviews by Scott Brown and Gregory Kirschling. This EW section also includes "Critical Mass" - a round up of the grades that have also been given by a number of noted movie reviewers in the American press (such as Ty Burr from the Boston Globe and Todd McCarthy from Variety and Roger Ebert from the Chicago Sun-Times). Additionally, this section includes the box-office figures from the previous weekend and an "Ask the Critic" sidebar featuring the critics' answers to readers' questions about film criticism. The only new film that has ever been given an A+ rating by EW is My Left Foot in one of the magazine's first issues.
  • DVD & Video, color-coded in blue, rates recently released DVDs on both the quality of the film, and of the DVD extras. Generally, the critics avoid rating the films themselves, unless it is something that was not recently in theaters. A chart is also given that displays the sales of DVDs and the amount of video rentals for the previous week.
  • Television, color-coded in green, reviews made-for-TV movies and new series, as well as some television specials. There is also a section of sound bites featuring quotes from various television shows. The section also includes the Nielsen ratings for the previous week.
    • What to Watch, currently written by Alynda Wheat, features brief one or two sentence reviews of several TV shows on each night of the week, as well as one slightly longer review, usually written by someone else, with a letter grade.
  • Music, color-coded in orange, reviews major album releases for the week, divided by genre. There is also typically at least one interview or feature, as well as a section called "Download This," highlighting several singles available for download on the Internet. A chart displaying record sales and airplay for the previous week is also included.
  • Books, color-coded in gray, features reviews of books released during the week. Sometimes, authors will write guest reviews of other works. There is also typically one interview or spotlight feature in this section per issue. Bestseller lists appear at the end of this section.
  • Theater, color-coded in purple, (not in every issue) reviews shows currently playing, divided by the city where they are running.
  • Review sections focused on Kids (children's entertainment) and Internet (websites, software, and video gaming), each color-coded in yellow, have been retired.

A foreign film is a film that is considered foreign in a particular country. ... Owen Gleiberman is a film critic for Entertainment Weekly. ... Ty Burr has been a film critic for the Boston Globe since 2002. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Variety is a daily magazine for the entertainment industry. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... My Left Foot can refer to: My Left Foot is a book. ... DVD is an optical disc storage media format that is used for playback of movies with high video and sound quality and for storing data. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In film and broadcasting, a soundbite is a very short piece of footage taken from a longer speech or an interview in which someone with authority says something which is considered by those who edit the speech or interview to be a most important point. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

The back page

The final (non-cover) page of the magazine is devoted to a different feature each week. The features include:

  • The Pop of King, Stephen King's column, where he discusses various aspects of pop culture, including movie or book recommendations among other things.
  • Stupid Questions with..., a short interview, usually with a comedian or comic actor, featuring witty, irrelevant, or playfully insulting questions.
  • The Great American Pop Culture Quiz has been running for the magazine's 15th anniversary. The quiz features trivia questions about pop culture from a specific year. Each time the quiz is published, they highlight another year that the magazine has been in publication. This was also the inspiration for the VH1 television show The World Series of Pop Culture.

Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Look up Trivia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... The World Series of Pop Culture is a VH1 game show tournament program sponsored by Alltel Wireless, based on Entertainment Weeklys Pop Culture Quiz. ...

Specialty issues

Every year, Entertainment Weekly publishes a number of specialty issues. These issues are often published as double issues (issues given two consecutive weeks as its date). Usually, these features will be so big in length that it will take the place of all other feature articles.


Common specialty issues include:

  • Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter Preview - Generally, each quarter, the magazine covers upcoming releases in movies, music, television, live shows, and books. Occasionally, the focus will be on upcoming movies only.
  • The Photo Issue - Once a year, EW dedicates an issue to featuring (aside from the normal reviews and news content) only photos of celebrities. Unlike tabloid issues, these are photos done with the celebrities' cooperation, and often they use some form of artistic expression. A wide variety of celebrities are used, including Green Day, Reese Witherspoon, Morrissey, the cast of the show Arrested Development and Cameron Diaz. Generally, the photos will contain some descriptive text, sometimes about the person or sometimes a commentary from the photographers.
  • Academy Awards issues - The magazine's staff is obsessed with the Oscars and devotes at least four cover stories per year to the world's most pretigious movie awards; these are "The Oscar Race Begins" issue in January predicting the nominees, the special nominees issue profiling all the recently-announced Oscar contenders in February, the "Oscar Odds" issue predicting the winners the week before the awards, and the after-awards issue covering the ceremony the week after it airs. Virtually every issue of EW mentions the Oscars in some capacity, oftentimes on the cover, and many articles throughout the year about actors, movies, and film festivals will speculate as to a film or actor's Academy Awards chances. In comparison, music's Grammy Awards, television's Emmy Awards, and theater's Tony Awards are given relatively limited coverage.
  • End-of-the-Year Issue - The last issue of each year. On each cover is the Entertainer of the Year, which is chosen by readers at EW's official website. The issue consists of the 10 best items released in theater, film, TV, music, DVD, literature, and (as of last year) fashion that year. Music, TV, and Movies have two critics give their top 10; the others only have one. Each section also has a five-worst list (Movies is the only section in which both critics give the worst). Also in the issue are special sections devoted to (and logically titled) Entertainers of the Year, Great Performances, Breakout Stars, a timeline of infamous celebrity mishaps, and obituaries of stars who died (this used to be in a separate issue; it was combined with the EOTY issue in 2003). This is the only issue without any reviews.

In 2006, Grey's Anatomy was named Entertainment Weekly's Entertainer of the year. Green Day is an American rock band band comprising three core members: Billie Joe Armstrong (guitar, lead vocals), Mike Dirnt (bass, backing vocals) and Tré Cool (drums). ... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon,[1] known simply as Reese Witherspoon, is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Steven Patrick Morrissey (born May 22, 1959) is a singer and songwriter from Manchester, England. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Cameron Michelle Diaz (born August 30, 1972) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American actress and former fashion model. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... An Emmy Award. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... Greys Anatomy is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American primetime television medical drama. ...


This year, 2006, Helen Mirren ranks second on the list, followed by the comedian behind Borat, Sacha Baron Cohen. Kiefer Sutherland is fourth, Meryl Streep is fifth and YouTube is sixth. Rounding out the top ten are Beyoncé, Daniel Craig, Stephen Colbert and "Project Runway."


Previous EW Entertainers of the Year include Bart Simpson, Jodie Foster, Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, Rosie O'Donnell, Ellen DeGeneres, Russell Crowe, Leonardo DiCaprio, Ricky Martin, Nicole Kidman, Denzel Washington, Jon Stewart, and the casts of Saturday Night Live, Friends, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, and Lost (TV series). For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson (comic book series). ... Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director, and producer. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946), commonly referred to as Steven Spielberg, is a highly famous, enormously influential, three-time Academy Award winning American film director and producer who is one of the most prominent figures from the world of cinema and whose very name has become synonymous with... Thomas Tom Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor, Emmy winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer who starred in family-friendly and screwball comedies before achieving notable success as a dramatic actor in well written plum roles in Philadelphia... Roseann Teresa ODonnell (born March 21, 1962 in Bayside, Queens, New York) is an Emmy-award winning American talk show host, television personality, comedian, film, television, and stage actress. ... Ellen Lee DeGeneres (born January 26, 1958) is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and currently the Emmy Award-winning host of the syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show. ... Russell Ira Crowe (born April 7, 1964) Academy Award-winning New Zealand and Australian[1] film actor. ... Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (born November 11, 1974[1]) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor well known for his roles in blockbuster movies such as William Shakespeares Romeo + Juliet (1996), Titanic (1997), Catch Me If You Can (2002), Gangs of New York (2002), The... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nicole Mary Kidman AC (born June 20, 1967) is an Australian[2][3] Academy Award-winning film actress and a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. ... Denzel Jermaine Washington, Jr. ... Jon Stewart (born Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz on November 28, 1962) is a nine-time Emmy-winning American comedian, satirist, actor, author, and producer. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Friends. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Lost is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning serial drama television series that follows the lives of a group of plane crash survivors on a mysterious tropical island, somewhere in the South Pacific. ...


External link

  • Official site

See also

  • List of People on the Cover of Entertainment Weekly

  Results from FactBites:
 
Entertainment Weekly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1408 words)
Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. in the United States which covers movies, television, music, Broadway stage productions, books, and popular culture.
Entertainment Weekly follows a typical magazine format by featuring a letters to the editor and table of contents in the first few pages, while also featuring advertisements.
Also in the issue are special sections devoted to (and logically titled) Entertainers of the Year, Great Performances, Breakout Stars, a timeline of infamous celebrity mishaps, and obituaries of stars who died (this used to be in a separate issue; it was combined with the EOTY issue in 2003).
Entertainment Weekly Magazine Subscriptions (167 words)
Entertainment Weekly magazine follow current news on all the celebrities and famous folks.
Entertainment Weekly magazine will bring it to your doorstep 52 times a year.
Entertainment Weekly magazine will also include info on books, DVD's, and music styles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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