FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
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Encyclopedia > English honorifics

An honorific is something that is attached to the name but is not normally used elsewhere, e.g Mr, Sir, Mrs, Dr, Master. Contrast this with a title or position can appear without the person's name e.g the President, the Earl, and may be associated with a particular role or area, eg. the US President, Financial Director, Earl of Cornwall.. (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ...


Examples

RANK HONORIFIC
King or Queen
  • Your Majesty
  • Your [description] Majesty
  • My Liege (if you've sworn fealty)
Prince or Princess Your Highness
Duke or Duchess Your Grace
Count/Earl or Countess Your Excellency
Viscount or Viscountess Your Excellency
Baron or Baroness Your Excellency
Judge Your honor

This article treats the generic title monarch. ... The word Queen may have many meanings: Political A queen regnant is a female monarch. ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... A prince (from the Latin princeps) is a male member of royalty or a royal family. ... For other meanings, see Prince (disambiguation). ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess. Originally the title comes denoted the rank of a high official in the late Roman Empire: before Anthemius was made emperor in the West in 467, he was... An Earl as a member of the British peerage ranks below a Marquess and above a Viscount. ... This page is about the European nobility; for the baseball term, see count (baseball). ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility, especially of France, and of the British peerage, where a viscount ranks above a baron, below an earl (a count in France), and corresponds in Britain to the Anglo-Saxon shire reeve. ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility, especially of France, and of the British peerage, where a viscount ranks above a baron, below an earl (a count in France), and corresponds in Britain to the Anglo-Saxon shire reeve. ... Various rulers or governments of Europe, of Japan bestow or recognise the title of baron. ... Baroness could refer to: Female equivalent of Baron. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ...

See also


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