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Encyclopedia > English Electric
English Electric logo
English Electric logo

English Electric was a 20th-century British industrial manufacturer, initially of electric motors, and expanding to include railway locomotives and aviation, before becoming part of GEC. Image File history File links English_Electric. ... Image File history File links English_Electric. ... Rotating magnetic field as a sum of magnetic vectors from 3 phase coils An electric motor converts electrical energy into mechanical energy. ... The General Electric Company plc or GEC was a major UK company involved in consumer and defence electronics, communications and engineering. ...

Contents

Poopory

  • 1917: Dick, Kerr & Co. acquired the United Electric Car Company, who made trams in Preston.
  • 1918: The English Electric Company was formed.
  • 1918 & 1919: EEC took over Dick, Kerr & Co. of Preston (England), Willans & Robinson of Rugby, and the Phoenix Dynamo Manufacturing Company of Bradford. It also bought the Stafford works of Siemens Bros, Dynamo Works Ltd. Dick, Kerr & Co.'s traction activities were concentrated in Preston and continued there until 1930. Also included was Coventry Ordnance Works Ltd.
  • 1926 Aicraft department closed after last English Electric Kingston flying boat built.
  • 1930: The manufacture of electrical equipment was moved to Bradford. Tramcar, bus body, and rolling stock production stayed at Preston.
  • Late 1920s: EE was in a parlous financial state. A complex financial reorganisation, apparently backed by American Westinghouse interests, was needed to save it.
  • 1930: The man most associated with EEC, George Nelson, became managing director.
  • 1930s: EE supplied equipment for the electrification of the English Southern Railway system, which gave it a strong position in the traction market.
  • 1939: EE acquires Samlesbury Aerodrome in Lancashire and starts construction of the Handley Page Hampden and Handley Page Halifax
  • 1939-1945 (World War II): EE made a substantial contribution to the British war effort.
  • 1942: EE took over Napier & Son, an aero-engine company, and this helped establish the company's aircraft division. Company factories were converted to build the Handley-Page Halifax heavy bomber.
  • 1945 and after: EE invested heavily in aircraft design, leading to major successes in the 1950s with the Lightning interceptor and Canberra tactical bomber, which in 2005 was still flying in reconnaissance and other roles with many air forces, including the RAF.
  • 1946: EE took over the Marconi Company. This was a foray into domestic markets.
  • 1955: EE took over Vulcan Foundry and Robert Stephenson and Hawthorne, both with substantial railway engineering pedigrees. EE also made steam turbines.
  • 1958: EE's aviation business was set up separately, as English Electric Aviation Ltd.
  • 1960: EE tried to take over one of the other major British electrical companies, GEC.
  • Early 1960s : Under government pressure EE rationalised its aircraft division, which later became part of the new British Aircraft Corporation (BAC), English Electric having a 40% stake in BAC.
  • 1963: English Electric's guided weapons division added to BAC.
  • 1967: GEC took over AEI.
  • 1967 or 1968: Failed bid for EE by Plessey.
  • 1968: The new GEC conglomerate took over EE.
English Electric Canberra PR.9 of the RAF, 2006. All RAF Canberras are now retired
English Electric Canberra PR.9 of the RAF, 2006. All RAF Canberras are now retired
English Electric Lightning, 1964
English Electric Lightning, 1964

Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Dick, Kerr and Company was a locomotive manufacturer in Kilmarnock, Scotland. ... A CLRV Streetcar in the City of Toronto. ... Dick, Kerr and Company was a locomotive manufacturer in Kilmarnock, Scotland. ... Preston is a city and local government district in North West England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Rugby is a market town in the county of Warwickshire in the West Midlands of England, on the River Avon. ... The larger City of Bradford Metropolitan District includes other settlements in the surrounding area. ... Siemens AG (FWB:SIE, NYSE: SI) is the worlds largest electronics company. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... The English Electric P.5 Kingston was a British twin-engined biplane flying boat built by English Electric Company. ... The larger City of Bradford Metropolitan District includes other settlements in the surrounding area. ... A frontal view of the Tramcar. ... An articulated bus operated by the CTA in Chicago, Illinois, USA. A Go North East Bus parked in a lay-by in Tyne and Wear, England A bus is a large road vehicle intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver and sometimes a conductor. ... Rolling Stock banner Rolling Stock was a newspaper of ideas and a chronicle of the 1980s published in Boulder, Colorado by Ed Dorn and Jennifer Dunbar Dorn. ... The name Westinghouse can refer to any number of devices and independent businesses that can trace their roots to the work of George Westinghouse: // People George Westinghouse, founder of Westinghouse Electric Corporation Devices Westinghouse air brake. ... George Horatio Nelson, 1st Baron Nelson of Stafford (26 October 1887 — 16 July 1962) was a British engineer, the chairman of the firm English Electric. ... The Southern Railway in the United Kingdom was the smallest of the four railway systems created in the Grouping ordered by the Railways Act 1921. ... Samlesbury is a small village in the South Ribble area of Lancashire. ... Lancashire is a county in North West England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... The Handley Page HP.52 Hampden was a twin-engine medium bomber of the Royal Air Force that was one of the main front-line bombers at the start of World War II. Along with the Whitley and Wellington bombers, the Hampden bore the brunt of the early bombing war... The Handley Page Halifax was one of the British front-line, four-engine heavy bombers of the Royal Air Force during Second World War. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... Napier & Son were one of the most important English aircraft engine manufacturers in the early to mid 20th Century. ... Wingspan Height 20 ft 9 in 6. ... A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping boobs. ... An Airbus A380, currently the worlds largest passenger airliner An aircraft is any vehicle or craft capable of atmospheric flight. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... The English Electric Lightning (later the BAC Lightning) was a supersonic British fighter aircraft of the Cold War era, particularly remembered for its great speed, and its natural metal exterior that was used throughout much of its service life with the Royal Air Force and the Royal Saudi Air Force. ... The MiG-25 is a Russian interceptor that was the mainstay of the Soviet air defence. ... The English Electric Canberra was a first-generation jet bomber manufactured in large numbers through the 1950s. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... RAF redirects here. ... The Marconi Company Ltd. ... Vulcan Foundry was a British locomotive builder sited at Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire. ... Preserved RSH Works No. ... Rituraj-rituraj 07:07, 7 January 2007 (UTC) A rotor of a modern steam turbine, used in a power plant A steam turbine is a mechanical device that extracts thermal energy from pressurized steam, and converts it into useful mechanical work. ... Aviation refers to flying using aircraft, machines designed by humans for atmospheric flight. ... The General Electric Company plc or GEC was a major UK company involved in consumer and defence electronics, communications and engineering. ... The British Aircraft Corporation, or BAC, was a British aircraft manufacturer, formed from the forced merger of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, English Electric, Vickers-Armstrong and Hunting Aircraft Company in 1959. ... Associated Electrical Industries (AEI) was a British engineering company formed in 1959 by the merger of the British Thomson-Houston Company (BTH) and Metropolitan Vickers. ... The Plessey Company plc was a British-based international electronics, defence and telecommunications company. ... The General Electric Company plc (GEC) is a British company that was renamed Marconi plc on November 30, 1999 after its defence unit Marconi Electronic Systems was divested and sold to British Aerospace. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2136x1283, 154 KB) English Electric Canberra PR.9 (identifier XH135) taking off from the Royal International Air Tattoo, RAF Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2136x1283, 154 KB) English Electric Canberra PR.9 (identifier XH135) taking off from the Royal International Air Tattoo, RAF Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. ... Lightning XM215 at Farnborough Air Show, England, in 1964. ... Lightning XM215 at Farnborough Air Show, England, in 1964. ...

Products

Aircraft

Both Dick, Kerr & Co. and the Phoenix Dynamo Manufacturing Company of Thornbury, Bradford had built aircraft in the First World War - flying boats designed by the Seaplane Experimental Station at Felixstowe. The Kingston was a flying boat design of the Phoenix company when it joined English Electric. Dick, Kerr and Company was a locomotive manufacturer in Kilmarnock, Scotland. ... Boeing 314 A flying boat is an aircraft that is designed to take off and land on water, in particular a type of seaplane which uses its fuselage as a floating hull (instead of pontoons mounted below the fuselage). ... The Seaplane Experimental Station at Felixstowe was a British aircraft design unit of the early part of the 20th Century. ... Statistics Population: 29,349 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TM306345 Administration District: Suffolk Coastal Shire county: Suffolk Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Suffolk Historic county: Suffolk Services Police force: Suffolk Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East of England...


The first foray by English Electric into aircraft production was given up in 1926. The return of English Electric to aircraft building came from the undertaking during the expansion of the RAF prior to the Second World War of "shadow production" of other aircraft manufacturers designs. This started with production of the Handley Page Hampden bomber in 1938. English Electric built nearly 800 aircraft, more than half of the Hampdens produced. They then built Handley Page's heavy bomber, the Halifax. At the end of the war they entered production of the second British jet fighter, the de Havilland Vampire, with 1,300 plus built at Samlesbury. Their own design work took off after the Second World War under W. E. W. Petter, formerly of Westland Aircraft. Although EE had only two aircraft produced before their activities became part of BAC, the design team put forward suggestions for many Air Ministry projects. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Handley Page HP.52 Hampden was a twin-engine medium bomber of the Royal Air Force that was one of the main front-line bombers at the start of World War II. Along with the Whitley and Wellington bombers, the Hampden bore the brunt of the early bombing war... The Handley Page Aircraft Company was founded by Frederick Handley Page in 1909. ... The Handley Page Halifax was one of the British front-line, four-engine heavy bombers of the Royal Air Force during Second World War. ... The de Havilland Vampire, or DH.100, was the second jet-engined aircraft commissioned into the Royal Air Force during World War II (the first being the Gloster Meteor), although it did not see combat in that conflict. ... Samlesbury is a small village in the South Ribble area of Lancashire. ... William Edward Willoughby Petter (1908-1968) known as Teddy was an English aircraft designer. ... Westland Aircraft was a British aircraft manufacturer located in Yeovil in Somerset, formed just before the start of World War II. During the war the company produced a number of generally unsuccessful designs, but their Lysander would serve as an important liaison aircraft with the RAF. After the war the...

The English Electric P.5 Kingston was a British twin-engined biplane flying boat built by English Electric Company. ... The English Electric Canberra was a first-generation jet bomber manufactured in large numbers through the 1950s. ... The English Electric Lightning (later the BAC Lightning) was a supersonic British fighter aircraft of the Cold War era, particularly remembered for its great speed, and its natural metal exterior that was used throughout much of its service life with the Royal Air Force and the Royal Saudi Air Force. ... The English Electric Lightning (later the BAC Lightning) was a supersonic British fighter aircraft of the Cold War era, particularly remembered for its great speed, and its natural metal exterior that was used throughout much of its service life with the Royal Air Force and the Royal Saudi Air Force. ...

Computers

English Electric initial computing interests came about through agreements with RCA. They ultimately ended up as part of ICL. In 1963 EE merged the computing business of J Lyons (their LEO computers) with their own forming English Electric LEO. In 1964 Lyons sold their share to Marconi; the merger of Marconi and EE LEO resulted in English Electric Leo Marconi Computers, which eventually became part of ICL. International Computers Ltd, or ICL, was a large British computer hardware company that operated from 1968 until 2002, when it was renamed Fujitsu Services Limited after its parent company, Fujitsu. ... The British LEO I (Lyons Electronic Office I) computer, ran its first business application in 1951. ... Marconi may be: People Guglielmo Marconi (1874–1937) Corporations: Alenia Marconi Systems GEC Marconi Marconi plc (formerly GEC) Marconi Electronic Systems Matra Marconi Space This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The initialism ICL may have several meanings: Image Cash Letter exchange, is the process through a law passed in October 2004, called Check 21, which permits banks to pass images back and forth rather than actual checks. ...

The DEUCE (Digital Electronic Universal Computing Engine) was one of the earliest British commercially available computers, built by English Electric in the early 1950s. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... KDF9 was an early British computer designed and built by English Electric, later English Electric Leo Marconi, EELM, later still incorporated into ICL. It came into service ca. ...

Guided weapons

Thunderbird in displayed in Finnish Anti-aircraft museum (Ilmatorjuntamuseo) in Tuusula. ...

Tank production

The Excelsior was an experimental tank based on the Cromwell (A27) developed in the Second World War when there were concerns as to performance of the Churchill tank. ...

Railway Equipment

British Rail Class 83, no. E3035, on display at Doncaster Works open day on 27th July 2003.
British Rail Class 83, no. E3035, on display at Doncaster Works open day on 27th July 2003.
British Rail Class 50, no. 50035 Ark Royal at Doncaster Works on 27th July 2003.


Engines Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2839x1833, 3147 KB) Napier Deltic, Alycidon, at the National Railway Museum, York. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2839x1833, 3147 KB) Napier Deltic, Alycidon, at the National Railway Museum, York. ... British Rail assigned Class 55 to the twenty-two English Electric Type 5 express diesel locomotives built in 1961/2 and used for high-speed service on Britains East Coast Main Line between London Kings Cross and Edinburgh. ... Locomotives arranged around the turntable in the Great Hall. ... York is a city in North Yorkshire, England, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 591 KB)BR Class 83, no. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 591 KB)BR Class 83, no. ... Class 83, no. ... Doncaster is a town in the English county of South Yorkshire, and the principal settlement of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 608 KB) BR Class 50, no. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 608 KB) BR Class 50, no. ... 50050 Fearless at Reading, 1975. ... HMS Ark Royal (R09) was an Audacious-class aircraft carrier of the British Royal Navy and, when she was decommissioned in 1978, was the Royal Navys last remaining conventional catapult and arrested-landing supercarrier. ... Doncaster railway works was in the town of Doncaster in the county of Yorkshire in England. ...

Locomotives and Multiple Units Rudolf Christian Karl Diesel (1858-1913), inventor of the diesel engine. ... English Electric 6SRKT was a 6-cylinder diesel railway locomotive engine manufactured in the 1950s by the English Electric company of the United Kingdom. ...

D3312 at Kings Cross, 1963 in British Railways green livery 08 910 at Carlisle, 1975 in British Rail blue livery. ... CLASS 09/0 Class 09, later 09/0, locomotives were modified from Class 08 locomotives and were re-geared to give a maximum top speed of 27. ... British Rail Class 11 was applied to a batch of locomotives built from April 1945 to December 1952, based on a similar earlier batch. ... CLASS 12 This was the second batch of standard SR shunters based on the English Electric 6KT 350 hp (260 kW) diesel engine. ... The British Rail Class 13 was formed because in 1965 it was found necessary to provide more powerful shunters for the Tinsley Hump Yard. ... D8036 at Euston in 1963 in original green livery without yellow warning panels. ... The Class 23 Bo Bo diesel electric so-called Baby Deltics were a ten strong class of locomotives built by the English Electric Company in 1959. ... D6712 at Liverpool Street, 1963 in BR green with yellow warning panels. ... D202 at Liverpool Street in green livery, 1963. ... 50050 Fearless at Reading, 1975. ... British Rail assigned Class 55 to the twenty-two English Electric Type 5 express diesel locomotives built in 1961/2 and used for high-speed service on Britains East Coast Main Line between London Kings Cross and Edinburgh. ... Class 73, no. ... Class 83, no. ... Class 86/6, nos. ... The British Rail Class 487 electrical multiple units were built by English Electric in 1940, for use on the Waterloo & City Line. ... D0226 and D0227 were two prototype diesel shunting locomotives built in 1956 by English Electric at its Vulcan Foundry in Newton-le-Willows to demonstrate its wares to British Railways. ... DP1, or DELTIC as it is more popularly known, was a demonstrator locomotive built by the English Electric company in 1955. ... DP2, meaning Diesel Prototype number 2, was a prototype Type 4 mainline diesel locomotive built in 1962 by English Electric at their Vulcan Foundry in Newton-le-Willows to demonstrate its wares to British Railways. ... GT3, meaning Gas Turbine number 3 (following 18000 and 18100 as gas turbines 1 and 2), was a prototype mainline gas turbine locomotive built in 1961 by English Electric at their Vulcan Foundry in Newton_le_Willows to demonstrate its wares to British Railways. ... The 1 Class of Northern Ireland Railways consisted of three diesel-hydraulic shunting locomotives Numbered 1, 2 & 3. ... The Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) 600 Class diesel locomotives were built for shunting duties. ... The NZR DE class were a New Zealand class of shunting diesel-electric locomotives. ... The NZR English Electric DF class was the first class of mainline diesel-electric locomotives built for New Zealands national railway network. ... The NZR DG and DH class locomotives were a class of diesel-electric locomotives in New Zealand. ... The DI class locomotive was a class of diesel-electric locomotive in New Zealand. ... The NZR DM class is a type of electric multiple unit used in the Wellington region of New Zealand by Tranz Metro. ... The NZR E class battery electric locomotive represented the third unique type of locomotive to be given the E classification in New Zealand. ... The NZR EO class of 1923 were electric locomotives used on the steep Otira to Arthurs Pass section of the Midland Line. ... The NZR EW class locomotive was a class of electric locomotive used in Wellington, New Zealand. ... X Class locomotive was the first class of diesel-electric locomotives to enter main line service on a Government-owned railway in Australia, in Tasmania. ... EU06 is a code-name for a English electric locomotive in service at a Polish railway operator (PKP). ...

See also

  • Category:English Electric locomotives

  Results from FactBites:
 
The English Electric (BAC) Lightning (8161 words)
A powerful and impressive aircraft that was restricted by limited endurance and armament, it went into service as an "interim solution" in the early 1960s, only to finally be retired from first-line roles in 1988.
Beginning in 1946, a design team at English Electric (EE) under W.E.W. "Teddy" Petter began design studies for a supersonic fighter, leading to award of a Ministry of Supply (MoS) contract in 1947 under specification "ER.103" for a design study on an experimental aircraft that could achieve Mach 1.2.
By this time, the Lightning had become the "British Aircraft Corporation (BAC)" Lightning, since English Electric had been absorbed into the BAC organization on 12 January 1960.
English Electric Lightning - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1831 words)
The English Electric Lightning (later the BAC Lightning) was a supersonic British fighter aircraft of the Cold War era, particularly remembered for its great speed, and its natural metal exterior that was used throughout much of its service life with the Royal Air Force and the Royal Saudi Air Force.
In July 2006 the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter was officially named "Lightning II", a reference to the English Electric Lightning and the Lockheed P-38 Lightning.
The prototype, known as the English Electric P.1, was built to satisfy the British Air Ministry's 1947 specification F23/49 and flew for the first time from RAF Boscombe Down on 4 August 1954.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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