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Encyclopedia > Engine

An engine is something that produces an output effect from a given input. The origin of engineering however, came from the design, building and working of (military "engines") because before such devices came to be employed in battles there were very few mechanical devices used. Military engines included siege engines, large catapults, trebuchets, battering rams etc. So the first engineers were military engineers, then later as engineering developed, there came civil engineers. These were engineers who dealt with designing, building and commissioning roads, bridges, docks and wharves, large public and private buildings. Look up engine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ...


An engine whose purpose is to produce kinetic energy output from a fuel source is called a prime mover; alternatively, a motor is a device which produces kinetic energy from a preprocessed "fuel" (such as electricity, a flow of hydraulic fluid or compressed air). The kinetic energy of an object is the extra energy which it possesses due to its motion. ... For other uses, see Fuel (disambiguation). ... For the philosophical/theological concept of a prime mover (that is, a self-existent being that is the ultimate cause or mover of all things), see cosmological argument. ... A motor is a device that converts energy into mechanical power, and is often synonymous with engine. ...


A car has a starter motor, a windscreen wiper motor, windscreen washer motor, a fuel pump motor and motors to adjust the wing mirrors from within the car and a (motorised) radio antenna - but the power plant that propels the car is an engine. Again an aircraft will have many motors installed for operation of its many auxiliary operations and services, but aircraft are propelled by engines, in this case, jet engines.

Contents

Usage of the term

Originally, early at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in everyday language Engine an engine was any sort of mechanical device that converted some form of energy into mechanical or motion force. The term "gin" as in cotton gin is recognised as originating from the Old French word 'engin' as a short form of its usage. Practically every device from the industrial revolution was referred to as an engine, and this is where the steam engine gained its name. The term has more recently become popular in computer science in terms like "search engine", "3-D graphics game engine", "rendering engine" and "text-to-speech engine", even though these "engines" are not mechanical and cause no mechanical action (this usage may have been inspired by the "difference engine", and early mechanical computing device). Military devices such as catapults are referred to as siege engines. In more recent usage, the term is used to describe devices that perform mechanical work, follow-ons to the original steam engine. In most cases the work is supplied by exerting a torque, which is used to operate other machinery, generate electricity, pump water or compress gas. In the context of propulsion systems, an air breathing engine is one that uses atmospheric air to oxidise the fuel carried, rather than carrying an oxidiser, as in a rocket. Theoretically, this should result in a better specific impulse than for rocket engines. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates the cotton fibres from the seedpods and the sometimes sticky seeds. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... This article is about search engines. ... A game engine is the core software component of a computer video game or other interactive application with real-time graphics. ... A web browsers layout engine takes content (HTML, XML, images, etc. ... Speech synthesis is the artificial production of human speech. ... Part of Babbages Difference engine, assembled after his death by Babbages son, using parts found in his laboratory. ... Replica catapult at Château des Baux, France For the handheld Y-shaped weapon, see slingshot. ... Replica battering ram at Château des Baux, France. ... In physics, mechanical work is the amount of energy transferred by a force. ... Torque applied via an adjustable end wrench Relationship between force, torque, and momentum vectors in a rotating system In physics, torque (or often called a moment) can informally be thought of as rotational force or angular force which causes a change in rotational motion. ... Electricity (from New Latin ēlectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... This article is about a mechanical device. ... A gas compressor is a mechanical device that increases the pressure of a gas by reducing its volume. ... For other uses, see Fuel (disambiguation). ... This article is about vehicles powered by rocket engines. ... Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a way to describe the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. ... A cold (un-ignited) rocket engine test at NASA A rocket engine is a reaction engine that can be used for spacecraft propulsion as well as terrestrial uses, such as missiles. ...


Antiquity

Simple machines, such as club and oar (examples of the lever), are prehistoric. More complex engines using human power, animal power, water power, wind power and even steam power date back to antiquity. Human power was focused by the use of simple engines, such as the capstan, windlass or treadmill, and with ropes, pulleys, and block and tackle arrangements, this power was transmitted and multiplied. These were used in cranes and aboard ships during Ancient Greece, and in mines, water pumps and siege engines in Ancient Rome. The writers of those times, including Vitruvius, Frontinus and Pliny the Elder, treat these engines as commonplace, so their invention may be far more ancient. By the 1st century AD, various breeds of cattle and horses were used in mills, using machines similar to those powered by humans in earlier times. In physics, a simple machine is any device that only requires the application of a single force to work. ... A development of the club, a mace consists of a strong, heavy wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ... An oar is an implement used for water-borne propulsion. ... Levers can be used to exert a large force over a small distance at one end by exerting only a small force over a greater distance at the other. ... Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... Manual labour (or manual labor) is physical work done with the hands, especially in an unskilled job such as fruit and vegetable picking, road building, or any other field where the work may be considered physically arduous, and which has as a profitable objective, usually the production of goods. ... A working animal is a (semi-)domesticated animal that is kept by humans and often trained to perform various tasks, regardless whether they are also used for consumption of meat and milk or for other products (such as leather). ... An overshot water wheel standing 42 feet high powers the Old Mill at Berry College in Rome, Georgia A water wheel (also waterwheel, Norse mill, Persian wheel or noria) is a hydropower system; a system for extracting power from a flow of water. ... A Dutch tower windmill, sporting sails, surrounded by tulips A windmill is an engine powered by the wind to produce energy, often contained in a large building as in traditional post mills, smock mills and tower mills. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... A portion of a model depicting a manual capstan in use. ... A windlass is an apparatus for moving a heavy weight. ... A woman on a treadmill. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... For the band, see Pulley (band). ... This block and tackle on a davit of the Mercator is used to help lower a boat. ... A modern crawler type derrick crane with outriggers. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... The term ancient Greece refers to the period of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... This article is about a mechanical device. ... A siege engine is a device that is designed to break or circumvent city walls and other fortifications in siege warfare. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (born ca. ... Sextus Julius Frontinus (c. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... An ancient Chinese tomb model of a foot-powered mill, Eastern Han Dynasty (25 - 220 AD), Freer Gallery of Art. ...


According to Strabo, a water powered mill was built in Kaberia in the kingdom of Mithridates in the 1st century BC. Use of water wheels in mills spread through Europe over the next few centuries. Some were quite complex, with aqueducts, dams, and sluices to maintain and channel the water, and systems of gears, or toothed-wheels made of wood with metal, used to regulate the speed of rotation. In a poem by Ausonius in the 4th century, he mentions a stone-cutting saw powered by water. Hero of Alexandria demonstrated both wind and steam powered machines in the 1st century, although it is not known if these were put to any practical use. The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... Parthian Empire at its greatest extent, c60 BCE. The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the east and... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... An overshot water wheel standing 42 feet high powers the Old Mill at Berry College in Rome, Georgia A water wheel (also waterwheel, Norse mill, Persian wheel or noria) is a hydropower system; a system for extracting power from a flow of water. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... Sluice gates near Henley, on the River Thames A small wooden sluice in Magome, Japan, used to power a waterwheel. ... Spur gears found on a piece of farm equipment. ... Decimus Magnus Ausonius (c. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


Modern

English inventor Sir Samuel Morland allegedly used gunpowder to drive water pumps in the 17th century. For more conventional, reciprocating internal combustion engines the fundamental theory for two-stroke engines was established by Sadi Carnot, France, 1824, whilst the American Samuel Morey received a patent on April 1, 1826. (Dugald Clark) Sir Dugald Clark (1854 – 1932) designed the first two-stroke engine in 1878 and patented it in England in 1881. Automotive production has used a range of energy-conversion systems. These include electric, steam, solar, turbine, rotary, and piston-type internal combustion engines. The petrol internal combustion engine, operating on a four-stroke Otto cycle, has been the most successful for automobiles, while diesel engines are used for trucks and buses. Karl Benz was one of the leaders in the development of new engines. In 1878 he began to work on new designs. He concentrated his efforts on creating a reliable gas two-stroke engine that was more powerful, based on Nikolaus Otto's design of the four-stroke engine. Karl Benz showed his real genius, however, through his successive inventions registered while designing what would become the production standard for his two-stroke engine. Benz finished his engine on New Year's Eve and was granted a patent for it in 1879. In 1896, Karl Benz was granted a patent for his design of the first engine with horizontally-opposed pistons. Many BMW motorcycles use this engine type. His design created an engine in which the corresponding pistons move in horizontal cylinders and reach top dead centre simultaneously, thus automatically balancing each other with respect to their individual momentums. Engines of this design are often referred to as flat engines because of their shape and lower profile. They must have an even number of cylinders and six, four or two cylinder flat engines have all been common. The most well-known engine of this type is probably the Volkswagen beetle engine. Engines of this type continue to be a common design principle for high performance aero engines (for propellor driven aircraft) and, engines used by automobile producers such as Porsche and Subaru. Image File history File links animated scheme of a four stroke internal combustion engine, Otto principle Source: self-made: UtzOnBike (3D-model & animation: Autodesk Inventor) File links The following pages link to this file: Four-stroke cycle ... Image File history File links animated scheme of a four stroke internal combustion engine, Otto principle Source: self-made: UtzOnBike (3D-model & animation: Autodesk Inventor) File links The following pages link to this file: Four-stroke cycle ... The four-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine is the cycle most commonly used for automotive and industrial purposes today ( cars and trucks, generators, etc). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Samuel Morland Sir Samuel Morland (1625 – 30 December 1695) was a notable English academic, diplomat, spy, inventor and mathematician of the 17th century, a polymath credited with early developments in relation to computing, hydraulics and steam power. ... Smokeless powder Gunpowder is a pyrotechnic composition, an explosive mixture that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot gas which can be used as a propellant in firearms and fireworks. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The internal combustion engine is an engine in which the combustion of fuel and an oxidizer (typically air) occurs in a confined space called a combustion chamber. ... The two-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine differs from the more common four-stroke cycle by having only two strokes (linear movements of the piston) instead of four, although the same four operations (intake, compression, power, exhaust) still occur. ... Sadi Carnot in the dress uniform of a student of the École polytechnique Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot (June 1, 1796 - August 24, 1832) was a French physicist and military engineer who gave the first successful theoretical account of heat engines, now known as the Carnot cycle, thereby laying the... Samuel Morey (October 23, 1762 - April 17, 1843), American inventor, invented the internal combustion engine and was a pioneer in steamships who accumulated a total of 20 patents. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... Solar power from a parabolic reflector. ... A Siemens steam turbine with the case opened. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... Karl Benz kb Karl Friedrich Benz, for whom an alternate French spelling of Carl is used occasionally, (November 25, 1844, Karlsruhe, Germany – April 4, 1929, Ladenburg, Germany) was a German engine designer and mechanical engineer, generally regarded as the inventor of the gasoline-powered automobile. ... Nikolaus August Otto (June 14, 1832 - January 28, 1891) was the German inventor of the internal-combustion engine. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Continuance of the use of the internal combustion engine for automobiles is partly due to the improvement of engine control systems (onboard computers providing engine management processes, and electronically controlled fuel injection). Forced air induction by turbocharging and supercharging have increased power outputs and efficiencies available. Similar changes have been applied to smaller diesel engines giving them almost the same power characteristics as petrol engines. This is especially evident with the popularity of smaller diesel engine propelled cars in Europe. Larger diesel engines are still often used in trucks and heavy machinery. They don't burn as clean as gasoline engines, however they have far more torque. The internal combustion engine was originally selected for the automobile due to its flexibility over a wide range of speeds. Also, the power developed for a given weight engine was reasonable; it could be produced by economical mass-production methods; and it used a readily available, moderately priced fuel - petrol.

Mercedes V6 engine in 1996
Mercedes V6 engine in 1996
School model of engine
School model of engine
School model of an engine
School model of an engine

In today’s world, there has been a growing emphasis on the pollution producing features of automotive power systems. This has created new interest in alternate power sources and internal-combustion engine refinements that were not economically feasible in prior years. Although a few limited-production battery-powered electric vehicles have appeared, they have not proved to be competitive owing to costs and operating characteristics. In the twenty-first century the diesel engine has been increasing in popularity with automobile owners. However, the gasoline engine, with its new emission-control devices to improve emission performance, has not yet been challenged significantly. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x736, 128 KB) Mercedes V6 Rennmotor aus der DTM, 1996, eigenes Foto, File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Engine ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x736, 128 KB) Mercedes V6 Rennmotor aus der DTM, 1996, eigenes Foto, File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Engine ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 550 pixel Image in higher resolution (2800 × 1924 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 550 pixel Image in higher resolution (2800 × 1924 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 566 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1994 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 566 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1994 pixel, file size: 3. ...


The first half of the twentieth century saw a trend to increase engine power, particularly in the American models. Design changes incorporated all known methods of raising engine capacity, including increasing the pressure in the cylinders to improve efficiency, increasing the size of the engine, and increasing the speed at which power is generated. The higher forces and pressures created by these changes created engine vibration and size problems that led to stiffer, more compact engines with V and opposed cylinder layouts replacing longer straight-line arrangements. In passenger cars, V-8 layouts were adopted for all piston displacements greater than 250 cubic inches (4 litres). The Liberty V8 aircraft engine clearly shows the configuration A V8 engine is a V engine with eight cylinders. ... A cubic inch is the volume of a cube which is one inch long on each edge. ...


The design principles favoured in Europe, because of economic and other restraints, leant toward smaller cars and corresponding design principles that concentrated on increasing the combustion efficiency of smaller engines. This produced more economical engines with earlier four-cylinder designs rated at 40 horsepower (30 kW) and six-cylinder designs rated as low as 80 horsepower (60 kW), compared with the large volume V-8 American engines with power ratings in the range from 250 to 350 hp (190 to 260 kW).


Earlier automobile engine development produced a much larger range of engines than is in common use today. Engines have ranged from 1 to 12 cylinder designs with corresponding differences in overall size, weight, piston displacement, and cylinder bores. Four cylinders and power ratings from 19 to 120 hp (14 to 90 kW) were followed in a majority of the models. Several three-cylinder, two-stroke-cycle models were built while most engines had straight or in-line cylinders. There were several V-type models and horizontally opposed two- and four-cylinder makes too. Overhead camshafts were frequently employed. The smaller engines were commonly air-cooled and located at the rear of the vehicle; compression ratios were relatively low. The 1970s and '80s saw an increased interest in improved fuel economy which brought in a return to smaller V-6 and four-cylinder layouts, with as many as five valves per cylinder to improve efficiency. The largest internal combustion engine ever built is the Wärtsilä-Sulzer RTA96-C - a 14 cylinder, 2 stroke, turbocharged diesel engine that was designed to power the Emma Maersk, the largest container ship in the world. This engine weighs 2300 tonnes, and when running at 102 r/min produces 109000bhp (80080 kW) consuming some 13.7 tonnes of fuel each hour. The Wärtsilä RT-flex96C turbocharged two-stroke diesel engine is currently considered the largest reciprocating engine in the world, designed for large container ships, running on cheap, heavy fuel oil. ... Emma Mærsk is a container ship owned by the A.P. Moller-Maersk Group. ...


Air-breathing engines

Air-breathing engines use atmospheric air to oxidise the fuel carried, rather than carrying an oxidiser, as in a rocket. Theoretically, this should result in a better specific impulse than for rocket engines. Air-breathing engines include: An engine is something that produces some effect from a given input. ... This article is about vehicles powered by rocket engines. ... Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a way to describe the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. ...

The internal combustion engine is an engine in which the combustion of fuel and an oxidizer (typically air) occurs in a confined space called a combustion chamber. ... A Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine for the F-15 Eagle is tested at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, USA. The tunnel behind the engine muffles noise and allows exhaust to escape. ... A ramjet, sometimes referred to as a stovepipe jet, is a type of jet engine. ... X-43A with scramjet attached to the underside at Mach 7 A scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) is a variation of a ramjet with the key difference being that the flow in the combustor is supersonic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A pulse jet engine is a very simple form of internal combustion engine wherein the combustion occurs in pulses and the propulsive effort is a reaction to the rearward flow of hot gasses. ... A liquid air cycle engine (LACE) is a spacecraft propulsion engine that attempts to gain efficiency by gathering part of its oxidizer from the atmosphere. ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ...

References

  • J. G. Landels, Engineering in the Ancient World, ISBN 0-520-04127-5

See also

This article is about devices that perform tasks. ... Timeline of motor and engine technology 1698 - Thomas Savery builds a steam-powered water pump for pumping water out of mines 1712 - Thomas Newcomen builds a piston-and-cylinder steam-powered water pump for pumping water out of mines 1769 - James Watt patents his first improved steam engine 1816 - Robert... Heat engines have been known since antiquity but were only made into useful devices at the time of the industrial revolution in the eighteenth century. ... A motor is a device that converts energy into mechanical power, and is often synonymous with engine. ... A Siemens steam turbine with the case opened. ... This machine has a single-stage centrifugal compressor and turbine, a recuperator, and foil bearings. ... Kaplan turbine and electrical generator cut-away view. ... A heat engine is a physical or theoretical device that converts thermal energy to mechanical output. ... Components of a typical, four stroke cycle, DOHC piston engine. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... A rotor of a modern steam turbine, used in a power plant A steam turbine is a mechanical device that extracts thermal energy from pressurized steam, and converts it into useful mechanical work. ... Cut away diagram of a Rhombic Drive Beta Stirling Engine Design Pink - Hot cylinder wall, Dark grey - Cold cylinder wall (with coolant inlet and outlet pipes in Yellow), Dark Green - Thermal insulation separating the two cylinder ends, Light Green - Displacer piston, Dark Blue - Power piston, Light Blue - Flywheels, Not Shown... An internal combustion engine is an engine that is powered by the expansion of hot combustion products of fuel directly acting within an engine. ... This article is about vehicles powered by rocket engines. ... 1939 Lanz Bulldog tractor with hot bulb engine. ... A diesel engine built by MAN AG in 1906 Rudolf Diesels 1893 patent on his engine design The Diesel engine is an internal combustion engine which operates using the Diesel cycle named after German engineer Rudolf Diesel, who invented it in 1876, based on the hot bulb engine, and... Gasoline engine (also referred to as petrol engine or Otto engine) invented at the end of the 19th century by German engineer Nikolaus Otto is a type of internal combustion engine which is often used for automobiles, aircraft, small mobile vehicles such as lawnmowers or motorcycles, and outboard motors for... Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, or HCCI, is a form of internal combustion in which well mixed fuel and oxidizer (typically air) are compressed to the point of auto-ignition. ... A remote camera captures a close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine during a test firing at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi Spacecraft propulsion is any method used to change the velocity of spacecraft and artificial satellites. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The air engine is an emission-free piston engine using compressed air. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Internal combustion engine. ... A motorcycle engine is an engine found in a motorcycle, which serves to propel the motorcycle. ... Bolinders two cylinder Trim outboard engine. ... An engine test stand is a facility used to develop, characterize and test engines. ... A heat engine is a physical or theoretical device that converts thermal energy to mechanical output. ... A thermodynamic cycle is a series of thermodynamic processes which returns a system to its initial state. ... A thermodynamic cycle is a series of thermodynamic processes which returns a system to its initial state. ... A stroke is a single action of certain engines. ... The Crower six-stroke engine or Crower Cycle is a concept under development by Bruce Crower. ... Today Internal combustion engines in cars, trucks, motorcycles, construction machinery and many others, most commonly use a four-stroke cycle. ... The Scuderi Split Cycle Engine design is a rethink of the conventional four-stroke Otto cycle internal combustion engine conceived by Carmelo J. Scuderi (1925-2002). ... A six stroke engine is an automobile engine in which the piston of the engine move up and down an additional time for each injection of fuel. ... The two-stroke cycle of an internal combustion engine differs from the more common four-stroke cycle by completing the same four processes (intake, compression, power, exhaust) in only two strokes of the piston rather than four. ... A pistonless rotary engine is an internal combustion engine that does not use pistons in the way a reciprocating engine does, but instead uses one or more rotors, sometimes called rotary pistons. ... The Britalus rotary engine was invented in 1982 by Kenneth W. Porter, P.E., M.S.A.E, of King County, Washington. ... A combustion chamber is part of an engine in which fuel is burned. ... Controlled Combustion Engine (CCE) is a type of internal combustion engine designed by Brad Howell-Smith in 1995. ... A Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine for the F-15 Eagle is tested at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, USA. The tunnel behind the engine muffles noise and allows exhaust to escape. ... An orbital engine is a type of internal combustion engine, featuring rotary rather than reciprocating motion of its internal parts. ... Components of a typical, four stroke cycle, DOHC piston engine. ... The Quasiturbine or Qurbine engine is a proposed pistonless rotary engine using a four-sided rhomboid rotor whose sides are hinged at the vertices. ... A cold (un-ignited) rocket engine test at NASA A rocket engine is a reaction engine that can be used for spacecraft propulsion as well as terrestrial uses, such as missiles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Toroidal engine design is a form of internal combustion engine that features pistons that rotate within a toroidal space. ... The trochilic engine is composed of two mirror image gull wing segments intermeshed and rotating about a common central axis. ... The Twingle engine is a small-capacity two-stroke gasoline engine. ... Wankel Engine in Deutsches Museum Munich, Germany The Wankel rotary engine is a type of internal combustion engine, invented by German engineer Felix Wankel, which uses a rotor instead of reciprocating pistons. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The D Slide Valve was a form of rectilinear slide valve for use in rotative steam engines invented by William Murdoch and patented in 1799. ... Internal combustion engines using either four-stroke or two-stroke cycle with spark ignition and compression ignition, use poppet valves to allow air to flow through the cylinder head cylinder and exhaust gases out. ... Left side of a Ford Cologne V6 engine, clearly showing a (rusty) cast iron exhaust manifold - three exhaust ports into one pipe. ... In automotive engineering, an engine is referred to as multi-valve (or multivalve) when each cylinder has more than two valves. ... Piston valve in a brass instrument A piston valve is a device used to control the motion of a fluid along a tube or pipe by means of the linear motion of a piston within a chamber or cylinder. ... A poppet valve is a valve consisting of a hole, usually round or oval, and a tapered plug, usually a disk shape on the end of a shaft also called a valve stem. ... Figure 1: A de Laval nozzle, showing approximate flow velocity increasing from green to red in the direction of flow The main type of rocket engine nozzles used in modern rocket engines is the de Laval nozzle which is used to expand and accelerate the combustion gases, from burning propellants... piston engine Bristol Perseus The sleeve valve is a type of valve mechanism for piston engines which have traditionally relied on the more common poppet valve. ... For the use of the term in optics, see piston (optics). ... The Bourke engine was designed by Russell Bourke in the late 1930s, who endeavored to improve upon the Otto cycle engine. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: not an article, just links to pictures If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... The hydraulic cylinders on this excavator control the machines linkages. ... Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston diesel engines on the submarine USS Pampanito. ... The radial engine is an internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders point outward from a central crankshaft like the spokes on a wheel. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A single cylinder engine, colloquially known as a one-lunger, is an engine configuration consisting of just one cylinder. ... The Stelzer engine is a diesel engine design proposed by Frank Stelzer. ... Usually found in 4 and 6 cylinder configurations, the straight engine (often designed as inline engine) is an internal-combustion engine with all cylinders aligned in one row, with no or only minimal offset. ... A sphere rotating around its axis. ... In Euclidean geometry, an arc is a closed segment of a differentiable curve in the two-dimensional plane; for example, a circular arc is a segment of a circle. ... The motion of a non-offset piston connected to a crank through a connecting rod (as would be found in internal combustion engines), can be expressed through several mathematical equations. ... monkey ... piston (top) and connecting rod from typical automotive engine (scale is in centimetres) Components of a typical, four stroke cycle, DOHC piston engine. ... Crankshaft (red), pistons (gray) in their cylinders (blue), and flywheel (black) Continental engine marine crankshafts, 1942 Components of a typical, four stroke cycle, DOHC piston engine. ... The parallel motion was a mechanical linkage invented by James Watt in 1784 for his double-acting steam engine. ... The Peaucellier-Lipkin linkage (or Peaucellier-Lipkin cell), invented in 1864, was the first linkage capable of transforming rotary motion into perfect straight-line motion. ... In a piston engine, a piston rod joins a piston to a connecting rod. ... The primary claimed benefit of the revolving cylinder, axial piston engine is that a 4-cycle, reciprocating piston engine can be achieved without the need for a complex and expensive valve train. ... Cut away diagram of a Rhombic Drive Beta Stirling Engine Design Pink - Hot cylinder wall, Dark grey - Cold cylinder wall (with coolant inlet and outlet pipes in Yellow), Dark Green - Thermal insulation separating the two cylinder ends, Light Green - Displacer piston, Dark Blue - Power piston, Light Blue - Flywheels, Not Shown... The Scotch Yoke is a mechanism for converting the horizontal motion of a slider into rotational motion or vice-versa. ... The swashplate is the device that translates the pilots (or autopilots) commands via the helicopter flight controls into motion of the main rotor blades. ... Almen A-4 barrel engine The swashplate engine is a type of reciprocating engine that replaces the common crankshaft with a circulate plate. ... Watts Linkage The Watts linkage was invented by James Watt (1736--1819) to constrain the movement of a piston in a steam engine to move in a straight line. ... The Toroidal engine design is a form of internal combustion engine that features pistons that rotate within a toroidal space. ... The trochilic engine is composed of two mirror image gull wing segments intermeshed and rotating about a common central axis. ...

External links

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Engineering | The WWW Virtual Library (743 words)
Industrial engineers integrate human, information, material, monetary, and technological resources to produce goods and services optimally.
Links pertaining to petroleum engineering for the academic, governmental and industrial communities.
The Wastewater Engineering Virtual Library was established on Dec. 5, 1994 and is devoted to all aspects of municipal and industrial wastewater treatment.
Engineering technicians (2317 words)
Employment of engineering technicians often is influenced by the same local and national economic conditions that affect engineers; as a result, job outlook varies with industry and specialization.
Engineering technicians who work in research and development build or set up equipment; prepare and conduct experiments; collect data; calculate or record results; and help engineers or scientists in other ways, such as making prototype versions of newly designed equipment.
Growth in the largest specialty—electrical and electronics engineering technicians—is expected to be about as fast as the average, while employment of environmental engineering technicians is expected to grow faster than average to meet the environmental demands of an ever-growing population.
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