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Encyclopedia > Endoderm
Endoderm
Organs derived from endoderm.
Blastodermic vesicle of Vespertilio murinus. (Endoderm labeled as 'entoderm'.)
Gray's subject #6 49
MeSH Endoderm

Endoderm is one of the germ layers formed during animal embryogenesis. Cells migrating inward along the archenteron form the inner layer of the gastrula, which develops into the endoderm. Image File history File links Endoderm2. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Vespertilio murinus Linnaeus, 1758 The Parti-coloured Bat (Vespertilio murinus) is a species of bats in the family of Vesper bats. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Organs derived from each germ layer. ... Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo is formed and develops. ... The archenteron is an indentation that forms early on in a developing blastula. ... 1 - blastula, 2 - gastrula; orange - ectoderm, red - endoderm. ...


The endoderm consists at first of flattened cells, which subsequently become columnar. It forms the epithelial lining of the whole of the digestive tube except part of the mouth,pharynx and the terminal part of the rectum (which are lined by involutions of the ectoderm), the lining cells of all the glands which open into the digestive tube, including those of the liver and pancreas, the epithelium of the auditory tube and tympanic cavity, of the trachea, bronchi, and air cells of the lungs, of the urinary bladder and part of the urethra, and that which lines the follicles of the thyroid gland and thymus. “Gut” redirects here. ... male human mouth The mouth, also known as the buccal cavity or the oral cavity, is the orifice through which an organism takes in food and water. ... The pharynx (plural: pharynges) is the part of the neck and throat situated immediately posterior to the mouth and nasal cavity, and cranial, or superior, to the esophagus, larynx, and trachea. ... The rectum (from the Latin rectum intestinum, meaning straight intestine) is the final straight portion of the large intestine in some mammals, and the gut in others, terminating in the anus. ... The ectoderm is outermost of the three germ layers of the developing embryo, the other two being the mesoderm and the endoderm. ... The liver is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ... The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine systems of vertebrates[2]. It is both exocrine (secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes) and endocrine (producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin). ... Types of epithelium In biology and medicine, epithelium is a tissue composed of a layer of cells. ... Anatomy of the human ear. ... The tympanic cavity is a small cavity surrounding the bones of the inner ear. ... The trachea, or windpipe, is a tube that has an inner diameter of about 12mm and a length of about 10-16cm. ... A bronchus (plural bronchi, adjective bronchial) is a caliber of airways in the the respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. ... The heart and lungs (from an older edition of Grays Anatomy) The lung is an organ belonging to the respiratory system and interfacing to the circulatory system of air-breathing vertebrates. ... In anatomy, the urinary bladder is a hollow, muscular, and distensible (or elastic) organ that sits on the pelvic floor in mammals. ... In anatomy, the urethra is a tube which connects the urinary bladder to the outside of the body. ... The thyroid gland and its relations In anatomy, the thyroid (IPA θaɪɹoɪd) is an endocrine gland. ... Thymus, see Thyme. ...

Contents

Production

The following graph represents the products produced by the endoderm.

Germ Layer Category Product
Endoderm General[1] Gastrointestinal tract
Endoderm General Respiratory tract
Endoderm General Endocrine glands and organs (liver and pancreas)

Upper and Lower gastrointestinal tract The gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), also called the digestive tract, or the alimentary canal, is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. ... In humans the respiratory tract is the part of the anatomy that has to do with the process of respiration or breathing. ... The endocrine system is a control system of ductless endocrine glands that secrete chemical messengers called hormones that circulate within the body via the bloodstream to affect distant organs. ... The liver is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ... The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine systems of vertebrates[2]. It is both exocrine (secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes) and endocrine (producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin). ...

Additional images

See also

The ectoderm is outermost of the three germ layers of the developing embryo, the other two being the mesoderm and the endoderm. ... Organs derived from each germ layer. ... An Introduction to Histogenesis Histogenesis is defined as the formation of tissues and organs from undifferentiated cells (Encarta Dictionary). ... The mesoderm is one of the three germ layers in the early developing embryo, the other two layers being the ectoderm and the endoderm. ... Organogenesis is a stage of animal development where the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm are formed. ... Endodermal sinus tumor, formerly often known as yolk sac tumor, is a member of the germ cell tumor group of neoplasms. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The General category denotes that all or most of the animals containing this layer produce the adjacent product.

For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ...

References

Look up endoderm in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • Evers, Christine A., Lisa Starr. Biology:Concepts and Applications. 6th ed. United States:Thomson, 2006. ISBN 0-534-46224-3.

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. In the developing vertebrate embryo, somites are masses of mesoderm distributed along the two sides of the neural tube and that will eventually become dermis (dermatome), skeletal muscle (myotome), and vertebrae (sclerotome). ... In the developing vertebrate embryo, the somitomeres are loose masses of paraxial mesoderm derived cells that form along each side of the neural tube towards the end of the third gestational week. ... In vertebrate embryonic development, a group of embryonic tissues formed from somites that develop into the vertebrae. ... In vertebrate embryonic development, a group of tissues formed from somites that develop into the body wall muscle. ... The cutis plate is the dorsal portion of the paraxial mesoderm somite which gives rise to dermis. ... This article is about female reproductive anatomy. ... Allantois is a part of a developing animal embryo. ... The trophoblast (from Greek threphein: to feed) is considered to be the first of all embryonic annexes. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Syncytiotrophoblasts are cells found in the placenta of human embryos. ... The gestational sac is the only available intrauterine structure that can be used to determine if an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) exists, until the embryo is identified. ... The yolk sac is the first element seen in the gestational sac during pregnancy, usually at 5 weeks gestation. ... At the end of the fourth week the yolk-sac presents the appearance of a small pear-shaped vesicle (umbilical vesicle) opening into the digestive tube by a long narrow tube, the vitelline duct. ... The placenta is an ephemeral (temporary) organ present in female placental vertebrates during gestation (pregnancy), but a placenta has evolved independently also in other animals as well, for instance scorpions and velvet worms. ... In placental mammals, the umbilical cord is a tube that connects a developing embryo or fetus to the placenta. ... Umbilical arteries carry deoxygenated blood from the fetus to the placenta in the umbilical cord. ... Fetal circulation; the umbilical vein is the large, red vessel at the far left The umbilical vein is a blood vessel present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta to the growing fetus. ... Whartons jelly is a gelatinous substance within the umbilical cord. ... A drawing of the amniotic sac from Grays Anatomy. ... For the alien race in Stephen Donaldsons The Gap Cycle, see Amnion (Gap Cycle). ... For the entertainment company see Chorion (company) The chorion surrounds the embryo and other membranes. ... Decidua is the term for the uterine lining (endometrium) during a pregnancy. ... Before the fertilized ovum reaches the uterus, the mucous membrane of the body of the uterus undergoes important changes and is then known as the decidua. ... The trophoblast proliferates rapidly and forms a network of branching processes which cover the entire ovum and invade and destroy the maternal tissues and open into the maternal bloodvessels, with the result that the spaces in the trophoblastic network are filled with maternal blood; these spaces communicate freely with one... Chorionic villi are villi that sprout from the chorion, in order to give a maximum area of contact with the maternal blood. ... In the development of vertebrate animals, the branchial arches (or pharyngeal arches) develop during the fourth and fifth week in utero as a series of mesodermal outpouchings on the left and right sides of the developing pharynx. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into branchial arch. ... The cartilaginous bar of the mandibular arch is formed by what are known as Meckel’s cartilages (right and left) ; above this the incus is developed. ... The hyoid arch (or second branchial arch) assists in forming the side and front of the neck. ... Pharyngeal or branchial pouches form on the endodermal side between the branchial arches, and pharyngeal grooves (or clefts) form from the lateral ectodermal surface of the neck region to separate the arches. ... The mandibular and hyoid arches grow more rapidly than those behind them, with the result that the latter become, to a certain extent, telescoped within the former, and a deep depression, the cervical sinus, is formed on either side of the neck. ... During the third week there appears, immediately behind the ventral ends of the two halves of the mandibular arch, a rounded swelling named the tuberculum impar, which was described by His as undergoing enlargement to form the buccal part of the tongue. ... Pattern of the branchial arches. ... During the third week two areas of thickened ectoderm, the olfactory areas, appear immediately under the fore-brain in the anterior wall of the stomodeum, one on either side of a region termed the frontonasal prominence (or process). ... By the upgrowth of the surrounding parts the olfactory areas are converted into pits, the olfactory pits, which indent the fronto-nasal process and divide it into a medial and two lateral nasal processes. ... By the upgrowth of the surrounding parts the olfactory areas are converted into pits, the olfactory pits, which indent the fronto-nasal process and divide it into a medial and two lateral nasal processes (or nasal prominences[1] The terms nasolateral and nasomedial are also used. ... The rounded lateral angles of the medial process constitute the globular processes. ... By the fusion of the maxillary and nasal processes in the roof of the stomodeum the primitive palate (or primary palate[1]) is formed, and the olfactory pits extend backward above it. ... An Introduction to Histogenesis Histogenesis is defined as the formation of tissues and organs from undifferentiated cells (Encarta Dictionary). ... Organogenesis is a stage of animal development where the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm are formed. ... A gland is an organ in an animals body that synthesizes a substance for release such as hormones, often into the bloodstream (endocrine gland) or into cavities inside the body or its outer surface (exocrine gland). ... The thyroglossal duct is an embryological anatomical structure which forms the connection between the initial area of development of the thyroid gland and its final position. ... The vertebrate limb arises out of a general morphogenetic area called a limb field. ... In embryology, the limb bud is a structure formed by the developing limb, derived from lateral plate mesoderm[citation needed]. It is intimately related with the apical ectodermal ridge, which secretes factors inducing the initial differentiation of the limb bud. ... The Apical Ectodermal Ridge (AER) is a critical component in vertebrate limb development. ... Radiograph of lower right (from left to right) third, second, and first molars in different stages of development. ... The dental papilla is a condensation of ectomesenchymal cells called odontoblasts, seen in histologic sections of a developing tooth. ... An odontoblast is a biological cell of neural crest origin that is part of the outer surface of the dental pulp, and whose biological function is dentinogenesis, which is the creation of dentin, the substance under the tooth enamel. ... Ameloblast is the blast that synthezises enamel proteins that later mineralise to form enamel on teeth. ... Organs derived from each germ layer. ... The ectoderm is outermost of the three germ layers of the developing embryo, the other two being the mesoderm and the endoderm. ... The mesoderm is one of the three germ layers in the early developing embryo, the other two layers being the ectoderm and the endoderm. ... An Introduction to Histogenesis Histogenesis is defined as the formation of tissues and organs from undifferentiated cells (Encarta Dictionary). ... Organogenesis is a stage of animal development where the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm are formed. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
endoderm - HighBeam Encyclopedia (313 words)
endoderm, in biology, inner layer of tissue formed in the gastrula stage of the developing embryo.
The inner layer of the cup is the endoderm; the outer layer is the ectoderm ; a middle layer, the mesoderm, forms from a marginal zone.
The endoderm is the germ layer from which are formed the digestive system, many glands, and part of the respiratory system.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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