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Encyclopedia > End times

Contents

Part of a series of articles on
Christianity
Christianity

Foundations
Jesus Christ
Church · Christian Theology
New Covenant · Supersessionism
Apostles · Kingdom · Gospel
History of Christianity · Timeline
Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Christ is the English translation of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... The phrase One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church appears in the Nicene Creed () and, in part, in the Apostles Creed (the holy catholic church, sanctam ecclesiam catholicam). ... Given the overwhelming influence exercised by Christianity, especially in pre-modern Europe, Christian theology permeates much of Western culture and often reflects that culture. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Supersessionism (sometimes referred to as replacement theology by its critics) is a belief that Christianity is the fulfillment and continuation of the Old Testament, and that Jews who deny that Jesus is the Messiah are not being faithful to the revelation that God has given them, and they therefore fall... “Apostle” redirects here. ... The Kingdom of God or Reign of God (Greek basileia tou theou,[1]) is a foundational concept in Christianity, as it is the central theme of Jesus of Nazareths message in the synoptic Gospels. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... The history of Christianity concerns the history of the Christian religion and the Church, from Jesus and his Twelve Apostles to contemporary times. ... Christianity was around before it was actually refered to as Christianity. Before Christ was born, there were believers descended from Adam and Eve that knew who God was and had a connection (faith) with Him. ...


Bible
Old Testament · New Testament
Books · Canon · Apocrypha
Septuagint · Decalogue
Birth · Resurrection
Sermon on the Mount
Great Commission
Translations · English
Inspiration · Hermeneutics This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... The canonical list of the Books of the Bible differs among Jews, and Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox Christians, even though there is a great deal of overlap. ... A biblical canon is a list published by a religious authority of those books of the Bible that are considered inspired by God. ... The biblical apocrypha includes texts written in the Jewish and Christian religious traditions that either were accepted into the biblical canon by some, but not all, Christian faiths, or are frequently printed in Bibles despite their non-canonical status. ... The Septuagint: A page from Codex vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons English translation. ... This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Decalogue at Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The death and resurrection of Jesus are two events in the New Testament in which Jesus is crucified on one day (the Day of Preparation, i. ... The Sermon on the Mount was, according to the Gospel of Matthew 5-7, a particular sermon given by Jesus of Nazareth (estimated around AD 30) on a mountainside to his disciples and a large crowd. ... In Christian tradition, the Great Commission is the instruction of the resurrected Jesus Christ to his disciples, that they spread the faith to all the world. ... The Bible has been translated into many languages. ... The efforts of translating the Bible from its original languages into over 2,000 others have spanned more than two millennia. ... Biblical inspiration is the doctrine in Christian theology concerned with the divine origin of the Bible and what the Bible teaches about itself. ... Biblical Hermeneutics, part of the broader hermeneutical question, relates to the problem of how one is to understand Holy Scripture. ...


Christian Theology
Trinity (Father, Son, Holy Spirit)
History of · Theology · Apologetics
Creation · Fall of Man · Covenant · Law
Grace · Faith · Justification · Salvation
Sanctification · Theosis · Worship
Church · Sacraments · Eschatology
Given the overwhelming influence exercised by Christianity, especially in pre-modern Europe, Christian theology permeates much of Western culture and often reflects that culture. ... For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... Christian views of Jesus consist of the teachings and beliefs held by Christian groups about Jesus, including his divinity, humanity, and earthly life. ... In various religions, most notably Trinitarian Christianity, the Holy Spirit (in Hebrew רוח הקודש Ruah haqodesh; also called the Holy Ghost) is the third consubstantial Person of the Holy Trinity. ... This is an overview of the history of theology in Greek thought, Christianity, Judaism and Islam from the time of Christ to the present. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Christian apologetics is the field of study concerned with the systematic defense of Christianity. ... Creation (theology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In Abrahamic religion, The Fall of Man or The Story of the Fall, or simply The Fall, refers to humanitys purported transition from a state of innocent bliss to a state of sinful understanding. ... Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, oath, or bond, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bərîṯ, Standard Hebrew bərit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... In Christianity, divine grace refers to the sovereign favor of God for humankind, as manifest in the blessings bestowed upon all —irrespective of actions (deeds), earned worth, or proven goodness. ... Faith in Christianity centers on faith in the Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:1-4) ... the gospel I preached to you. ... In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of making or declaring a sinner righteous before God. ... In theology, salvation can mean three related things: freed forever from the punishment of sin Revelation 1:5-6 NRSV - also called deliverance;[1] being saved for something, such as an afterlife or participating in the Reign of God Revelation 1:6 NRSV - also called redemption;[2]) and a process... Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ... In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic theology, theosis (Greek: , meaning divinization (or deification, or to make divine), is the call to man to become holy and seek union with God, beginning in this life and later consummated in the resurrection. ... Monument honoring the right to worship, Washington, D.C. In Christianity, worship has been considered by most Christians to be the central act of Christian identity throughout history. ... In Christian theology, ecclesiology is the study of doctrine pertaining to the Church itself as a community or organic entity, and with the understanding of what the church is —ie. ... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


History and Traditions
Early · Councils · Creeds · Missions
Great Schism · Crusades · Reformation
Great Awakenings · Great Apostasy
Restorationism · Nontrinitarianism
Thomism · Arminianism
Congregationalism The term Early Christianity here refers to Christianity of the period after the Death of Jesus and the foundation of the churches of Jerusalem and Antioch in the 30s and before the First Council of Nicaea in 325. ... In Christianity, an Ecumenical Council or general council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... A creed is a statement or confession of belief — usually religious belief — or faith. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the later Papal Schism in Avignon, see Western Schism. ... The Siege of Antioch, from a medieval miniature painting, during the First Crusade. ... Another major contention was the tremendous corruption within the Churchs hierarchy, all the way up to the Bishop of Rome, who appointed individuals to various positions within the Church (bishop, cardinal, etc. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Revivalism. ... The Great Apostasy is a term of opprobrium used by some religious groups to allege a general fallen state of traditional Christianity, or especially of Catholicism, reformist Protestantism and Eastern Orthodoxy: that it is not representative of the faith founded by Jesus and promulgated through his twelve Apostles: in short... For other usages, see Dispensationalism, Restoration Movement, and Restoration Restorationism refers to unaffiliated religious movements that attempted to circumvent Protestant denominationalism and orthodox Christian creeds to restore Christianity to their constructions of its original form. ... Nontrinitarianism is any of various Christian beliefs that reject the doctrine that God is three distinct persons in one being, (the Trinity). ... Thomism is the philosophical school that followed in the legacy of Thomas Aquinas. ... For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...


Eastern Christianity
Eastern Orthodox · Oriental Orthodox
Syriac Christianity · Eastern Catholic
Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself: as the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the communion of Eastern Christian Churches that recognize only the first three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus — and reject the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon. ... Syriac Christianity is a culturally and linguistically distinctive community within Eastern Christianity. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ...


Western Christianity
Western Catholicism · Protestantism
Anabaptism · Lutheranism · Calvinism
Anglicanism · Baptist · Methodism
Evangelicalism · Fundamentalism
Liberalism · Adventism · Pentecostalism
Latter Day Saints · Christian Science
Jehovah's Witnesses · Unity Church
Western Christianity comprises Catholicism, Anglicanism, Protestantism. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Anabaptists (Greek ανα (again) +βαπτιζω (baptize), thus, re-baptizers [1], German: Wiedertäufer) are Christians of the Radical Reformation. ... Lutheranism is a movement within Christianity that began with the theological insights of Martin Luther in the 16th century. ... Calvinism is a theological system and an approach to the Christian life that emphasizes Gods sovereignty in all things. ... The term Anglican (from Medieval Latin ecclesia anglicana, meaning the English Church) is used to describe how the people, institutions and churches as well as the liturgical traditions and theological concepts developed by the state established Church of England, the Anglican Communion. ... Baptist is a term describing a tradition within Christianity and may also refer to individuals belonging to a Baptist church or a Baptist denomination. ... For the Methodist school of ancient Greek medicine, see Methodism (history of medicine) Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a broad collection of religious beliefs, practices, and traditions which are found among conservative Protestant Christians. ... Fundamentalist Christianity, or Christian fundamentalism, is a movement that arose mainly within British and American Protestantism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by conservative evangelical Christians, who, in a reaction to modernism, actively affirmed a fundamental set of Christian beliefs: the inerrancy of the Bible, the virgin birth... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term Adventist can refer to One who believes in the Second Advent (usually known as the Second coming) of Jesus. ... The Pentecostal movement within Evangelical Christianity places special emphasis on the direct personal experience of God through the baptism of the Holy Spirit, as shown in the Biblical account of the Day of Pentecost. ... The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement which began in the early 19th century and is generally considered to be founded by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Christian Science is a religious teaching regarding the efficacy of spiritual healing according to the interpretation of the Bible by Mary Baker Eddy, in her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (First published in 1875). ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Topics in Christianity
Movements · Denominations
Ecumenism Preaching · Prayer
Music · Liturgy · Calendar
Symbols · Art · Criticism
Christian movements are theological, political, or philosophical intepretations of Christianity that are not generally represented by a specific church, sect, or denomination. ... A denomination, in the Christian sense of the word, is an identifiable religious body under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... The word ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism) is derived from Greek (oikoumene), which means the inhabited world, and was historically used with specific reference to the Roman Empire. ... A sermon is an oration by a prophet or member of the clergy. ... This article is about the many forms of prayer within Christianity. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... // Partial list of Christian liturgies (past and present) Roman Catholic church (churches in communion with the Holy See of the Bishop of Rome) Latin Rite Novus Ordo Missae Tridentine Mass Anglican Use Mozarabic Rite Ambrosian Rite Gallican Rite Eastern Rite, e. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... Christian art is art that spans many segments of Christianity. ... Throughout the history of Christianity, a wide range of Christians and non-Christians alike have offered criticisms of Christianity, the Church, and Christians themselves. ...


Important Figures
Apostle Paul · Church Fathers
Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine
Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe
Luther · Calvin · Wesley · Pope Paul of Tarsus (b. ... The Church Fathers or Fathers of the Church are the early and influential theologians and writers in the Christian Church, particularly those of the first five centuries of Christian history. ... The relationship between Constantine I and Christianity entails both the nature of the conversion of the emperor to Christianity, and his relations with the Christian Church. ... Athanasius of Alexandria (Greek: Αθανάσιος) (also spelled Athanasios) (c. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109) was an Italian medieval philosopher and theologian, who held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas [Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino] (c. ... Gregory Palamas Gregory Palamas (Γρηγόριος Παλαμάς) (1296 - 1359) was a monk of Mount Athos in Greece and later Archbishop of Thessalonica known as a preeminent theologian of Hesychasm. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ...

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In the three Abrahamic Religions (Islam, Judaism, and Christianity), the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. In Muslim, Jewish, and Christian mysticism the period of internal struggle/jihad/angst presage the rebirth of the true Self (or Mahdi/Christ/Messiah) and unity with God/Allah. Primarily, the term End Times has evolved from use around a group of literal beliefs in Christian millennialism. For a more general view, see eschatology. map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ... The Horsemen of the Apocalypse, the entities that bring false peace, War, famine, pestilence, and death. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (מָשִׁיחַ Standard Hebrew Arabic: Al-Masih, المسيح), Tiberian Hebrew , Aramaic ) initially meant any person who was anointed by a prophet of God. ... Mysticism from the Greek μυστικός (mystikos) an initiate (of the Eleusinian Mysteries, μυστήρια (mysteria) meaning initiation[1]) is the pursuit of achieving communion or identity with, or conscious awareness of, ultimate reality, the divine, spiritual truth, or God through direct experience, intuition, or insight; and the belief that such experience is an... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Christ is the English translation of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (מָשִׁיחַ Standard Hebrew Arabic: Al-Masih, المسيح), Tiberian Hebrew , Aramaic ) initially meant any person who was anointed by a prophet of God. ... Millennialism (or chiliasm), from millennium, which literally means thousand years, is primarily a belief expressed in some Christian denominations, and literature, that there will be a Golden Age or Paradise on Earth where Christ will reign prior to the final judgment and future eternal state, primarily derived from the book... For the book by Pope Benedict XVI, see Eschatology (book). ...


Beliefs

These beliefs typically include the ideas that the Biblical apocalypse is imminent and that various signs in current events are omens of a climax to world history known as the battle of Armageddon. These beliefs have been widely held in one form, by the Adventist movement (Millerites), by Jehovah's Witnesses, and in another form by dispensational premillennialists. The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... now. ... The evangelist John of Patmos writes the Book of Revelation. ... William Miller The Millerite tradition is a diverse family of denominations and Bible study movements that have arisen since the middle of the 19th century, traceable to the Adventist movement sparked by the teachings of William Miller. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Christianity

Main article: Christian eschatology

End times beliefs in Christianity vary widely. Christian premillennialists, who believe the End Times are now, usually articulate a fairly specific timetable that climaxes in the end of the world. For some, Israel, the European Union, or the United Nations are seen as key players whose role was foretold in prophecies. Among dispensational premillennialists, there are those that believe that they will be supernaturally summoned to Heaven by God in an event called the Rapture before the tribulations prophesied in the Bible's book of Revelation take place. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article specifically relates to Premillennialism in Christian eschatology; for political millenarianism and other uses of the word see Millenarianism Premillennialism in Christian eschatology is the belief that Christ will literally reign on the earth for 1,000 years at his second coming. ... Many religious faiths teach that the end of the world will occur at some point in the future. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In conservative Protestant Christian eschatology, the rapture (harpazo in Greek in 1 Thessalonians 4:17) is the name given to the event in which all Christians living on earth are simultaneously transported to Heaven to be with Jesus Christ. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ...


'End times' may also refer simply to the passing of a particular age or long period in the relationship between man and God. Adherents to this view sometimes cite St. Paul's second letter to Timothy, and draw analogies to the late 20th/early 21st centuries. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... This article or section should be merged with First Epistle to Timothy The Second Epistle to Timothy is a book of the canonic New Testament, one of the three so-called pastoral epistles (1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and the Epistle to Titus). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2001-2100. ...



Post-Exilic Hebrew books of prophecy such as the Book of Daniel and Book of Ezekiel are given new interpretations in this Christian tradition, while apocalyptic forecasts appear in the Judeo-Christian Sibylline Oracles and in the whole field of apocalyptic literature, which includes the Book of Revelation ascribed to John, the apocryphal Apocalypse of Peter, and the Second Book Of Esdras. Prophecy in a broad sense, is the prediction of future events or the speaking of divine words (divine Revelation) through chosen human messengers (prophets). ... The Book of Daniel, written in Hebrew and Aramaic, is a book in both the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the Christian Old Testament. ... Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ... The surviving Sibylline Oracles are not the famous Sibylline Books of Roman history, which were lost not once, but twice, and thus there is very little knowledge of the actual contents. ... Apocalyptic literature was a new genre of prophetical writing that developed in post-Exilic Jewish culture and was popular among millennialist early Christians. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word απόκρυφα meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ... The recovered Apocalypse of Peter or Revelation of Peter is extant in two translations of a lost original, one Greek, one Ethiopic, which diverge considerably. ... In the Septuagint and for Eastern Orthodox Christians, 2 Esdras refers to the combination of Ezra and Nehemiah. ...


Religious movements which expect that the second coming of Christ, will be a cataclysmic event, generally called adventism, have arisen throughout the Christian era; but they became particularly common during and after the Protestant Reformation. Shakers, Emanuel Swedenborg (who considered the second coming to be symbolic, and to have occurred in 1757), and others developed entire religious systems around a central concern for the second coming of Christ, disclosed by new prophecy or special gifts of revelation. The Millerites are diverse religious groups which similarly rely upon a special gift of interpretation for fixing the date of Christ's return. In Christianity, Parousia means the (Second) Coming of Christ. ... Another major contention was the tremendous corruption within the Churchs hierarchy, all the way up to the Bishop of Rome, who appointed individuals to various positions within the Church (bishop, cardinal, etc. ... The Shakers, a Protestant religious denomination, originated in Manchester, England in 1772 under the leadership of Mother Ann Lee, who moved the 9-person group to New York in 1774. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... William Miller The Millerite tradition is a diverse family of denominations and Bible study movements that have arisen since the middle of the 19th century, traceable to the Adventist movement sparked by the teachings of William Miller. ...


The chief difference between the nineteenth century Millerite and Adventist movements and contemporary prophecy belief is that William Miller and his followers fixed the time for the Second Coming by calendar calculations based on interpretations of the Biblical apocalypses; they originally set a date for the Second Coming in 1844. These sorts of computations also appear in some contemporary prophecy beliefs, but few contemporary End Times prophets use them to fix a date; their timetables will be triggered by future wars and moral catastrophes, and accordingly believe that God's judgment against the conflict-ridden and corrupt world is close at hand. The term Adventist can refer to One who believes in the Second Advent (usually known as the Second coming) of Jesus. ... William Miller William Miller (1782 - 1849) was an American Baptist preacher, whose followers have been termed Millerites. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... A moral panic is a reaction by a group of people based on the false or exaggerated perception that some cultural behavior or group, frequently a minority group or a subculture, is dangerously deviant and poses a menace to society. ...


Dispensationalism, in contrast to the Millerite Adventist movement, got its start in the 19th century, when John Nelson Darby, founder of the Plymouth Brethren religious denomination, incorporated into his system of Biblical interpretation a system of organizing Biblical time into a number of discrete dispensations, each of which marks a separate covenant with God. Darby's beliefs were widely publicised in Cyrus I. Scofield's Scofield Reference Bible, an annotated Bible that became popular in the United States of America. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Nelson Darby John Nelson Darby, (November 18, 1800 - April 29, 1882) was an Anglo-Irish evangelist, an influential figure among the original Plymouth Brethren, and considered the father of modern Dispensationalism. ... The Plymouth Brethren are a Christian Evangelical religious movement that began in Dublin, Ireland and England in the late 1820s. ... A religious denomination, (also simply denomination) is a subgroup within a religion that operates under a common name, tradition, and identity. ... Dispensation is the act of an authority making an exception to laws, standards, or customs. ... Covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn and bilateral promise to do or not do something specified. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Cyrus Ingerson Scofield (1843-1921) was an American lawyer and Bible scholar. ... The Scofield Reference Bible is a widely circulated annotated study Bible edited and annotated by the American Bible student Cyrus I. Scofield. ...


Since the majority of the Biblical prophets were writing at a time when Palestine was mostly Jewish, and the Temple in Jerusalem was still functioning, they wrote as if those institutions would still be in operation during the prophesied events. According to Preterism this was the very fulfillment of the prophecies. However, according to Futurists their destruction in A.D. 70 put the prophetic timetable, if there is one, on hold. Many such believers therefore anticipated the return of Jews to Palestine and the reconstruction of the Temple before the Second Coming could occur. (See Christian Zionism) Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... The Temple in Jerusalem or the Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash) was the primary resting place of the Gods presence (shechina) in the physical world according to classical Judaism. ... Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which holds that some or all of the biblical prophecies concerning the Last Days (or End Times) refer to events which actually happened in the first century after Christs birth. ... Futurism is an interpretation of the Bible in Christian eschatology placing the fulfillment of the prophecies of the Book of Revelation and the Book of Daniel in the future as literal, physical, apocalyptic and global rather in the past as literal, physical and localised (i. ... for Christians who belong to Zionist denominations in southern Africa, see Zionist Churches Christian Zionism is a belief among some Christians that the return of the Jews to the Holy Land, and the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, is in accordance with Biblical prophecy. ...

The Last Judgement - Fresco in the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo
The Last Judgement - Fresco in the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo

The Apocalypse of John and Gospel of John are held by most current Christian scholars to have been written at least a decade after the fall of Jerusalem in 95 AD, especially those supportive of Dispensationalism the dominant belief in mainline American evangelicalism. But new voices within Christianity contest this claim (See Preterism) and much debate has ensued following publication of Kenneth Gentry's work Before Jerusalem Fell which argues from archaeology and ancient texts (including the Book of Revelation itself) that the book was written during the reign of Roman emperor Nero in the 60s AD. Download high resolution version (660x786, 236 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (660x786, 236 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: Cappella Sistina) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475 – February 18, 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, poet and engineer. ... The Revelation of St. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which holds that some or all of the biblical prophecies concerning the Last Days (or End Times) refer to events which actually happened in the first century after Christs birth. ... Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. ... Before Jerusalem Fell is a scholarly work written by Kenneth Gentry as his PhD thesis in theology from Bahnsen Theological Seminary which has since been made into a book. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, AD 37 – June 9, AD 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty (54–68). ...


Conservatives usually place the writing of the synoptic gospels before the fall of Jerusalem. Liberal Christians place the writing of the three other (synoptic) gospels after the fall of Jerusalem. One prominent Australian theologian from Sydney, Paul Barnett, disputes this and places the writing of John's gospel at an early date. Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... The Synoptic Gospels are the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of over 4. ... Dr. Paul Barnett was the Anglican Bishop of North Sydney from 1990 to 2001. ...


Dispensationalist prophecies

The Antichrist, by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1521) Here the Antichrist is shown wearing the triple crown of the Roman papacy.
The Antichrist, by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1521) Here the Antichrist is shown wearing the triple crown of the Roman papacy.

The foundation of Israel in 1948 gave a major boost to the dispensationalist belief system; Israel's history of wars with its Arab neighbours did even more for it. After the Six Day War in 1967 and the Yom Kippur War in 1973, it seemed plausible to many Fundamentalist Christians in the 1970s that Middle East turmoil may well be paving the way for the Battle of Armageddon. Image File history File links Lucas_Cranach_-_Antichrist. ... Image File history File links Lucas_Cranach_-_Antichrist. ... A self portrait Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472 – October 16, 1553) was a German painter. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... Combatants Israel Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Iraq Commanders Moshe Dayan, David Elazar, Ariel Sharon, Shmuel Gonen, Benjamin Peled, Israel Tal, Rehavam Zeevi, Aharon Yariv, Yitzhak Hofi, Rafael Eitan, Abraham Adan, Yanush Ben Gal Saad El Shazly, Ahmad Ismail Ali, Hosni Mubarak, Mohammed Aly Fahmy, Anwar Sadat, Abdel Ghani el-Gammasy, Abdul... Fundamentalist Christianity is a fundamentalist movement, especially within American Protestantism. ... The evangelist John of Patmos writes the Book of Revelation. ...


Leaders of the movement such as Hal Lindsey claimed furthermore that the European Economic Community founded on the Treaty of Rome was a revived Roman Empire, and would become the kingdom of the coming Antichrist and the Beast. A Roman Empire, of course, also figured in the New Testament writers' vision of the future. The fact that in the early 1970s, there were (erroneously thought to be) seven nations in the European Economic Community was held to be significant; this aligned the Community with a seven headed dragon in Revelation. This specific prophecy has required revision, but the idea of a revived Roman Empire remains. It is thought that it would be formed when the European Union becomes a single nation and emerges as a superpower. Harold Lee Hal Lindsey (born 1929) is an American evangelist and Christian writer. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony Signatures in the Treaty The Treaty of Rome established the European Economic Community (EEC) and was signed by France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg (the latter three as part of the Benelux) on March 25, 1957. ... Motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... For the Gorgoroth album, see Antichrist (album) Antichrist is translated from the Greek αντίχριστος antíkhristos, which literally means opposite of Christ. A broader meaning is in place of Christ. Therefore, antichrist means opposed to Christ by being in the place of Christ. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... The United States of Europe is a name given to one version of the hypothetical unification scenarios of Europe, as a sovereign federation of states, similar to the United States of America, both as projected by writers of speculative fiction and by political scientists and politicians. ... An American B-2 bomber in flight. ...


On 1 June 2000, Israel became an Associate Member of the European Union. This agreement was negotiated in 1995. This associate membership allows Israel to cooperate with Europe in industry, trade, transportation, communication, and energy usage. Israel is now officially linked to the so-called Revived Roman Empire. It is claimed that this associate membership of Israel with Europe establishes the relationship that Israel will have with the Antichrist who will be the President of the European Union. June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The accession of Israel to the European Union refers to a possible future development in the EU-Israel relations. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... European Council Council of Ministers European Commission European Parliament This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The Antichrist was supposed to be the dictatorial leader of a "one world government." He would promise peace to the world while leading Christians into apostasy, and impose a "one world money system" based on the number 666 in which everyone had to have the Number of the Beast branded on them or injected under the skin as a transponder in order to buy or sell. Like the Roman emperors of old, he would impose horrible martyrdoms on surviving Christians. At some point after his appearance, a large number of Jews would convert to Christianity and preach the gospel after the Christians had been removed by the Rapture. Apostasy (from Greek αποστασία, meaning a defection or revolt , from απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is a term generally employed to describe the formal renunciation of ones religion, especially if the motive is deemed unworthy. ... 666 is the natural number following 665 and preceding 667. ... The Number of the Beast is a concept from the Book of Revelation of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In conservative Protestant Christian eschatology, the rapture (harpazo in Greek in 1 Thessalonians 4:17) is the name given to the event in which all Christians living on earth are simultaneously transported to Heaven to be with Jesus Christ. ...


Believers in the system therefore scanned the headlines wondering if various world leaders might be the Antichrist, and wondering whether Mideast violence might be a sign of Armageddon. They feared such things as Social Security numbers and UPC barcodes, fearing that these tax identification numbers may be precursors to the dangerous Number of the Beast, whose receipt destines one's soul to damnation. Sample United States Social Security Card In the United States, a Social Security number (or SSN) is a 9 digit number issued to citizens, permanent residents, and temporary (working) residents under section 205(c)(2) of the Social Security Act, codified as . ... The Universal Product Code (UPC) is one of a wide variety of bar code languages called symbologies. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Dammit redirects here. ...


The Antichrist, (it is believed), will take the stage initially as the global peacemaker Daniel mentions in Daniel 9:27. This coming prince will broker a covenant or treaty with Israel for a period of seven years. Perhaps with global disarmament he will promise to ensure peace in the world after a particularly destructive future war. His ally will be the Whore of Babylon who was seen in vision by John in Revelation 17. John saw this mysterious harlot actually riding the beast and exerting some sort of control over him for a period of time. This harlot entity heads up an apostate church or some sort of global system of false religion. The Whore of Babylon rides the seven-headed Beast. ... Apostasy (Greek απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is the formal renunciation of ones religion. ...


At the midpoint of the final seven years a world ravaged by plague and turmoil turns to the Antichrist to lead it. Their hope is that a world dictator will deliver it from the beastly chaos the harlot rulership unleashed and was unable to control. The Antichrist at that time is possessed by a beast demon from the Abyss and so becomes the Beast. The prophet Daniel, again in Daniel 9:27 states that at this time this "prince" will stop the daily sacrifices, (which had been resumed again on the Temple Mount). He then commits an appalling sacrilege not unlike the outrages of the Greek Seleucid ruler Antiochus IV Epiphanes. Now fully revealed as the Beast, the Antichrist assumes global dictatorial rule and attempts to establish his 666 economic system. His persecutions of Christians and Jews at that time will be unprecedented. This three and a half year period of intense trouble and travail was referred to by Daniel. It was also spoken of by Jesus Christ in the Olivet Discourse. In Revelation 13 the Apostle John sets the limits to this great trial at 42 biblical months or three and a half years. This is referred to by Biblical eschatologists as the "Great Tribulation". And it coincides with the time of "Jacob's trouble" mentioned in Jeremiah and the trampling of Jerusalem referred to by John in Revelation 11. The Temple Mount as it appears today. ... Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... The Olivet discourse or Little Apocalypse is a passage found in the Synoptic Gospels of Matthew (24), Mark (13) and Luke (21), occurring just before the narrative of Jesuss passion beginning with the Anointing of Jesus. ...


Eventually, the Antichrist, under the threat of approaching armies from the orient, musters the armies of the west to attack Israel. At the climax of the story, Jesus returns in the Second Coming. He destroys the armies gathering for the campaign against Jerusalem. They are sown into the ground in the Valley of Meggido or Valley of Jezreel in northwest Israel. This is known as the Battle of Armageddon. The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... In Christian apocalyptic literature (the Book of Revelation), Armageddon or Har-Mageddon is the site of the final battle between the kings of the earth (incited by Satan) and the Christian God. ...


The separate destinies of the Church and Israel which is inherent in dispensationalism is a particular worry to Jews and to some evangelical Christians. Evangelicals who reject dispensationalism, such as those who hold to a Post Tribulation Rapture, (or more accurately a Post Tribulation Resurrection-Rapture), see both the Church and Israel entering the crucible of the End Time together. These Traditional Pre-Millennialists, as they are called, reject dispensationalism and its end time eschatology as setting forth a dubious eschatology of an "apartheid of the Elect". They consider the dispensationalist doctrine of a Pre-Tribulation Rapture to be self-serving and highly unlikely to be the true last days policy of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Traditional Pre-Millennialists see all the covenant people of the God of Israel being refined together in the crucible of the end time. They also see the "royal priesthood and holy nation" referred to by Moses and by the Apostle Peter being unveiled in the Apocalypse as a single remnant Elect drawn out from Israel and from the wider Church in the nations. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Christian eschatology, the Post Tribulation Rapture doctrine is the belief in a combined Resurrection and Rapture (eg. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Views of different groups

Many of the world's religions have a prophetic expectation that equates with the idea of the End Times.[1]. This section reviews some of these views.


Baha'i Faith

The founder of the Baha'i Faith, Baha'u'llah claimed that he was the Return of Christ as well as prophetic expectations of other religions. He also provided proofs of the End Times and His station. The inception of the Baha'i Faith coincides with Millerite prophesy pointing to the year 1844. With respect to particular expectations of the end times, it has been argued that the Battle of Armageddon has already passed[2] and that mass martyrdoms anticipated during the End Times had already passed within the Historical context of the Bahá'í Faith. Known in India as the Lotus Temple, the Bahai House of Worship attracts an average of three and a half million visitors a year. ... Baháulláh (1817–1892) (Persian: Mírzá Husayn-Alí (میرزا حسینعلی)) was the founder and prophet of the Baháí Faith. ... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... In Christian apocalyptic literature (the Book of Revelation), Armageddon or Har-Mageddon is the site of the final battle between the kings of the earth (incited by Satan) and the Christian God. ... The persecution of Baháís refers to the religious persecution of Baháís in various countries, especially in Iran, the nation of origin of the Baháí Faith, Irans largest religious minority and the location of one of the largest Baháí populations in the world. ...


Buddhism

As part of their Buddhist eschatology Buddhist have prophecies of the time before the Buddha named Buddha Maitreya would be characterized by impiety, physical weakness, sexual depravity and general societal disarray. In Buddhism, Maitreya Buddha is the future Buddha. ... Maitreya Bodhisattva (Sanskrit) or Metteyya Bodhisatta (Pāli) is the future Buddha of this world in Buddhist eschatology. ...


Catholicism

Catholics refer to the 25th chapter of Matthew's Gospel in which Christ says that "no one knows the hour or the day," except the Father. While some believe the prediction of dates or times is futile, many believe that Jesus foretold of signs which would indicate that the "end of days" was near. Some of these signs include natural disasters, civil problems, and other catastrophes. Of the precise time, however, it will come like a "thief in the night."


According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Catholic beliefs about the "end times" are addressed in the Profession of Faith. An explanation of these beliefs can be found on the Holy See's website: [3]


Hopi

Among the Native peoples of the Americas, the Hopi also have expectations of a "Day of Purification" followed by a great renewal. Hopi woman dressing hair of unmarried girl. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Hinduism

Hindus have a cyclic understanding of external history/internal spirituality. The Cycle or "Kalpa" illustrates the pattern of decline in the state of nature and civilization between periods of timelessness when Brahman (Creator aspect of mind/spirit) regenerates the world of existence/reality. There are four yugs or ages in this process from completely pure to completely impure. The final is Kali Yuga or the Iron Age where civilization becomes spiritually degraded, human lives are shortened by violence and disease and there is a general state of decay in nature. This is the worst period before complete destruction which is then followed by a Golden Age, see [4]. A kalpa is a Sanskrit word meaning an aeon, or a long period of time in Hindu and Buddhist cosmology. ... Brahman (Devanagari: ब्रह्म) is the concept of the Godhead found in Hinduism. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages, in Cyrillic Југославија) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... Kali Yuga is also the title of a book by Roland Charles Wagner. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

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The length of Kalpa (when taken literally) is interpreted differently by various groups from 5,000 years according the Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University to 4,320 million years in the terms of orthodox Hindus. The BKWSU is unique in believing in a 5th age called the Confluence Age which correlates to the Christian concept of "End Times", a time of both destruction of the world and revelation of God. According to BKWSU beliefs, humanity entered the End Times in approximately 1936 and the world will end currently in approximately 2036. Image File history File links Circle-question. ... Prajapita Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa Vidyalaya or Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University is considered a monastic or semi-monastic[1] millenarianist New Religious Movement (NRM) of Indian origin. ... The Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual Organisation, also known as the Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual Organization, Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University (BKWSU), or Prajapita Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa Vidyalaya. Teachers of a form of meditation, or spirit channeling, called Raja Yoga [not to be confused with classical Patanjalis Raja Yoga... // In Judeo-Christian theology, the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ... The Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual Organisation, also known as the Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual Organization, Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University (BKWSU), or Prajapita Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa Vidyalaya. Teachers of a form of meditation, or spirit channeling, called Raja Yoga [not to be confused with classical Patanjalis Raja Yoga... 2036 (MMXXXVI) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday Gregorian calendar. ...


As per the religious texts of Hinduism, Lord Vishnu has taken birth on the Earth 9 times. The last avtaar or incarnation will be as Kalki and he will destroy the wicked people on earth.


Islam

Main article: Islamic eschatology

Islam gives very clear guidelines to its followers regarding the end of times. There are various signs (as many as up to 100) given in the Sunnah and Quran for the coming of Judgment Day. These signs can be divided into two parts, minor and major. The major signs include the coming of an Antichrist, Imam Mahdi and then Prophet Jesus (who will combine forces of good against evil), the blowing of Trumpet and the minor signs will precede them. For a list of all signs of coming of Judgement day in Islam, visit [5] Islamic eschatology is concerned with the Qiyamah (end of the world; Last Judgement) and the final judgement of humanity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ...


Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses have very specific doctrines on the End Times, explained in detail in the literature of the Watchtower Society. Witnesses teach that the Greek word parousia, often translated as 'coming' really means 'presence', that the presence (invisible coming) of Christ began in the year 1914, and that he now sits at God's right hand, ruling amidst his enemies. (Ps. 110:1,2; Heb.10:12,13) Jehovah's Witnesses calculate the year 1914 from Bible prophecy. A number of corporations are in use by Jehovahs Witnesses. ... In Christianity, Parousia means the (Second) Coming of Christ. ...

  1. Daniel 4:17 says that the dream that God gave to King Nebuchadnezzar deals with the Kingdom of God and God's promise to give it to " the one whom he wants " or " the lowliest one of mankind." The Bible says that Jesus Christ was indeed "the lowliest one of mankind." (Phil. 2:7, 8; Matt. 11:28-30) He is also the one to whom Jehovah 'wants to' give the kingdom. (Luke 1:31-33; Rev. 11:15) Thus, Jehovah's Witnesses believe this dream was also fulfilled in Jesus Christ.
  2. Rulership over mankind, as represented by the tree and its rootstock, would have "the heart of a beast." (Dan. 4:16) As Jesus showed in his prophecy pointing to the conclusion of the system of things (end of the world), Jerusalem would be "trampled on by the nations, until the appointed times of the nations (gentile times)" were fulfilled. (Matt.24:3; Luke 21:24) According to Jehovah's Witnesses, "Jerusalem" represented the Kingdom of God because its kings were said to sit on "the throne of the kingship of Jehovah." (1 Chron. 28:4, 5; Matt. 5:34-35) The Gentile governments are represented in the book of Daniel by wild beasts (bears, rams, goats, etc). Daniel 2:37 depicts these kingdoms, beginning with Nebuchadnezzar, being given rulership of the world, succeeded by other kingdoms to follow. Then, in Daniel 2:44, God would reassert the authority of his kingdom by 'crushing' these kingdoms. This was a prophetic picture of how the gentile kingdoms would 'trample' on the right of God's Kingdom to direct human affairs and would themselves hold sway under Satan's control, until the 'gentile times' ended (Luke 21:21)[1] . (Dan. 7:2-8, 17, 23; 8:20-22; Rev. 13:1, 2; Luke 4:5, 6)
  3. Revelation 11:2, 3 and 12:6, 14 clearly states that 42 months (3 1/2 years) in that prophecy are counted as 1,260 days. "Seven times" or Seven years would be twice that, or 2,520 days. Bible shows that a day is counted as a year in calculating prophetic time in two of its many prophecies (Ezek. 4:6; Num. 14:34), then prophetic "seven times" means 2,520 years.
  4. According to Jehovah's Witnesses, the counting of the "seven times" begin after Zedekiah, the last king in the typical Kingdom of God, was removed from the throne in Jerusalem by the Babylonians. (Ezek. 21:25-27) Jehovah's witnesses believe that this took place 70 years before 537 B.C., the year in which they believe the Jews returned from captivity; that is, it took place by early October of 607 B.C. (Jer. 29:10; Dan. 9:2) Counting 2,520 years from early October of 607 B.C. brings us to early October of 1914.

The witnesses believe that this is born out in the events of 1914. Jesus answered the question of "the sign" of his presence by including the phrase "For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom." (Matthew 24:7) The 'Great War' of 1914 was even referred to secularly as WW1 - the first war of it's kind in history. They conclude that this is proof that WW1 was a significant part of the "the sign" of Christ's presence. Nebuchadnezzar (or Nebudchadrezzar) II (ca. ... Hebrew יְרוּשָׁלַיִם (Yerushalayim) (Standard) Yerushalayim or Yerushalaim Arabic commonly القـُدْس (Al-Quds); officially in Israel أورشليم القدس (Urshalim-Al-Quds) Name Meaning Hebrew: (see below), Arabic: The Holiness Government City District Jerusalem Population 724,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 123,000 dunams (123 km²) Jerusalem (Hebrew:  , Yerushaláyim or Yerushalaim; Arabic:  , al-Quds, the Holiness)[2... Babylonian captivity also refers to the permanence of the Avignon Papacy. ...


Jehovah's Witnesses generally do not use the expression 'end of the world', with its connotations of the destruction of humanity or the planet, but prefer to use the expression 'conclusion of a system of things', thus maintaining the distinction between the original-language words kosmos (world) and aion (age, or system of things)


Witness eschatology envisages the following series of events at the end of the system of things: For the book by Pope Benedict XVI, see Eschatology (book). ...

  1. Christ becomes King in heaven in 1914 and Satan and his angels are hurled down to the earth. (Revelation 11:15; 12:7-12) "last days" of 2 Timothy 3:1 begin.
  2. Fulfillment of prophecies in Matthew 24, Mark 13, Luke 21 about the 'conclusion of the system of things.'
  3. Possibly cry of 'peace and security' (1 Thessalonians 5:3)
  4. Destruction of Babylon the Great (all religions throughout the world who do not practice true Christianity) by the 'wild beast' referred to in Revelation 17 (understood by the Witnesses to be the worldwide political system through the United Nations.)
  5. Satan's attack on true Christians. (Ezekiel 38)
  6. Armageddon - God's war against the 'Kings of the Earth' (political rulers); destruction of the wicked.
  7. 1000-year reign of Jesus Christ. Survivors of Armageddon will work to make the earth a paradise, like the original Garden of Eden, and will gradually be restored to perfection. It is thought that the dead will be resurrected at this time and given the chance to learn righteousness. (Isaiah 26:9, 10)
  8. Final test; Satan let loose for a short time, destroyed along with his followers (Revelation 20:7-10)
  9. Christ hands the Kingdom over to his Father (1 Corinthians 15:28)

Witnesses remain neutral in political affairs and teach that believers on earth will be spectators only in the above-mentioned scenario, not participating in any type of warfare. For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... This article or section should be merged with First Epistle to Timothy The Second Epistle to Timothy is a book of the canonic New Testament, one of the three so-called pastoral epistles (1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and the Epistle to Titus). ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Mark (anonymous[1] but ascribed to Mark the Evangelist) is a Gospel of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... (Redirected from 1 Thessalonians) The Epistles to the Thessalonians, also known as the Letters to the Thessalonians, are two books from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The Whore of Babylon rides the seven-headed Beast. ... Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ... The evangelist John of Patmos writes the Book of Revelation. ... Millenarianism (sometimes spelled millenarism or millennarism) is the belief by a religious, social, or political group or movement in a coming major transformation of society after which all things will be changed in a positive (or sometimes negative or ambiguous) direction. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Christ is the English translation of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... The evangelist John of Patmos writes the Book of Revelation. ... Paradise, by Jan Bruegel The word paradise is derived from the Avestan word pairidaeza (a walled enclosure), which is a compound of pairi- (around), a cognate of the Greek peri-, and -diz (to create, make), a cognate of the English dough. ... The Fall of Man by Lucas Cranach, a 16th century German depiction of Eden The Garden of Eden (from Hebrew Gan Ēden, גַּן עֵדֶן) (Arabic jannato aden جنة عدن) is described in the Book of Genesis as being the place where the first man, Adam, and the first woman, Eve, lived after they were... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Righteousness is an important concept in the theology of Judaism and Christianity. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown. ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... Watchtower Buildings in Brooklyn, New York Jehovahs Witnesses are an international Christian denomination that had its origins in the United States with the 19th century Millerite and Bible Student movements. ... For other uses of War, see War (disambiguation). ...


Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as the Mormons, has taught that we are living in the last days. The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the most-recognized architectural symbol of Mormonism For other uses, see Mormon (disambiguation). ...


Some Latter-day Saints believe that the earth does have a temporal existence of 7000 years, and that the present day is somewhere near the 6000th year. They do not speculate as to the time, day or year of the second coming, but watch for indications that the event is approaching.


Latter-day Saints believe that their church is led by prophets who receive inspiration and direction from God. A number of Mormon leaders have taught that the Earth is allotted seven thousand years of existence, and that the earth is nearing the end of the sixth such millennium. Mormon leader Orson F. Whitney stated that we are now in the "late Saturday night" of earth's existence, and that the seventh thousand years will be marked by Christ's second coming and the millennial kingdom, which will be Earth's sabbath and day of rest. The seven seals and seven trumpets of the Book of Revelation relate to the seven millennia allotted to Earth by Latter-day Saint theology. In religion, a prophet (or prophetess) is a person who has directly encountered the divine and serves as an intermediary with humanity. ... Categories: LDS stubs ... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... This article concerns the Sabbath in Christianity. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ...


Latter-day Saints are frequently counseled to watch for the "signs of the times" but not to fear them. The statement "if ye are prepared ye shall not fear" (from Doctrine and Covenants 38:30) has become somewhat of a mantra among the Latter-day Saints. Wars, pestilence, economic despair, natural disasters and more are all part of what Latter-day Saints see as signs of the times. In particular, a great earthquake is mentioned in all cases.


Other events that Latter-day Saints regard as important, and the dates some of them have purportedly occurred:

  • Priesthood authority, which had been lost in the great apostasy, to be restored (this happened in May of 1829).
  • The pure gospel of Jesus Christ to be restored, and taught in His church (this happened April 6, 1830).
  • Elijah would return and give priesthood keys (this happened on April 3, 1836).
  • The return of the Jews to Jerusalem and Israel, as dedicated by Orson Hyde on October 24 1841 (first wave of Jewish immigration to Israel, or Aliyah (עלייה) started in 1881).
  • The building of a temple in Israel (has not yet occurred).
  • The building of a temple in Zion, Jackson County, Missouri (has not yet occurred, though the location is marked).
  • Temples will "dot the earth" (136 temples as of December 2006).
  • A meeting of priesthood leaders with angelic beings and Christ in Adam-ondi-Ahman (has not yet occurred).
  • Christ will appear in the Temple in Jackson County, Missouri (has not yet occurred).
  • Wars will be poured out upon all nations.
  • The nations of the earth will be gathered to fight Israel.
  • Wicked will be consumed by fire (some traditions allude to a nuclear holocaust, and some hold that this will be at the coming of Christ.)
  • The restored gospel will be preached in all nations, kindreds, tongues, and peoples (there are 53000 missionaries in 165 countries as of 2005).

Many LDS temples feature a statue of Moroni on the highest spire. Such statues face East, the direction from which Christ will come. The Salt Lake City temple has two large doors on the east side of the building, that are not used. Tradition holds that Christ will enter the temple through these doors, when He comes again. The Great Apostasy is a term of opprobrium used by some religious groups to allege a general fallen state of traditional Christianity, or especially of Catholicism, reformist Protestantism and Eastern Orthodoxy: that it is not representative of the faith founded by Jesus and promulgated through his twelve Apostles: in short... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hebrew יְרוּשָׁלַיִם (Yerushalayim) (Standard) Yerushalayim or Yerushalaim Arabic commonly القـُدْس (Al-Quds); officially in Israel أورشليم القدس (Urshalim-Al-Quds) Name Meaning Hebrew: (see below), Arabic: The Holiness Government City District Jerusalem Population 724,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 123,000 dunams (123 km²) Jerusalem (Hebrew:  , Yerushaláyim or Yerushalaim; Arabic:  , al-Quds, the Holiness)[2... Orson Hyde Orson Hyde (January 8, 1805 – November 28, 1878) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of Twelve Apostles. ... Dormition Church, situated on the modern Mount Zion Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Adam-ondi-Ahman is a historic site along the east bank of the Grand River in Daviess County, Missouri. ... Bern Switzerland Temple Statue of Angel Moroni Moroni [mÉ”rounai], according to the Book of Mormon, was the last Nephite prophet and military commander who lived in North America in the late fourth and early fifth centuries. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ...


After the coming of Christ to the mount of Olives, and the destruction of the wicked, the righteous will live on the earth in relative peace and prosperity during the millennium, under the leadership of Christ. Other churches still may exist during this time, and not all people living will be Latter-day Saints, but such people will represent the "more righteous" part of the peoples of the earth. Missionary work and temple work for the deceased (see Baptism for the dead) will continue during the millennium and missionary and genealogy work will be a main focus of Church members and other righteous individuals who live during the time leading up to the final judgement. A millennium (pl. ... Baptism for the dead is an ordinance performed today in temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for those who have died without having been baptized by one having authority. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Joseph Smith produced an inspired rendition of Matthew 24, relating to the end times. Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Pastafarianism

The Flying Spaghetti Monster worshippers have a apocolyptic view of the "end times". According to The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Moster, His Noodliness will come down from his invisible perch on mount beerspoutalotoffermentedbarleyproducts, and destroy us all with his great and mighty noodly appendages. He will burn and destroy us all, killing and crushing us with his gigantic meatballs, reserving his most terrible and frightening wrath for non-believers and gerbils. He is not especially racist, but savages such as vegans and barbie co. employees will be crushed like the heathens they are, bloodily and painfully. This adaptation of Michelangelos The Creation of Adam depicts the Flying Spaghetti Monster in its typical guise as a clump of tangled spaghetti with two eyestalks, two meatballs, and many noodly appendages. The Flying Spaghetti Monster is the deity of a parody religion[1] founded in 2005 by Oregon...


The Gospel also includes a quote from Thomas Edison, who is postulated to have been a Pastafarian. "And yay, when upon the damn heathens come fiery meatballs and little bits of sausage, and His noodly appendages touch all, to embrace some and indeed, destroy all else. That's when I'll make your damn colored lights, you ungrateful little boy!!!" Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life around the world. ...


Preterism

Another view of the 'end times' known as Preterism differentiates between the concept of 'end times' and 'end of time', and promotes a different understanding of these prophecies, in that they took place in the first century, more specifically in year AD 70, when the Jewish Temple was destroyed, and animal sacrifices were stopped. In this view, the 'end times' concept is referring to the end of the covenant between God and Israel, rather than the end of time, or the end of planet Earth. Unlike all the other Christian theological systems, Preterism holds an exclusive and unique view on the nature and timing of the 'End Times', in that Preterists teach the 'end times' to be in the first century AD. Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which holds that some or all of the biblical prophecies concerning the Last Days (or End Times) refer to events which actually happened in the first century after Christs birth. ... Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which holds that some or all of the biblical prophecies concerning the Last Days (or End Times) refer to events which actually happened in the first century after Christs birth. ... // In Judeo-Christian theology, the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ...


Preterists believe that prophecies such as the Second Coming, the defiling of the Temple, the destruction of Jerusalem, the Antichrist, the Great Tribulation, the advent of The Day of the Lord and the Final Judgment were fulfilled at or about the year AD 70 when the Roman general (and future Emperor) Titus sacked Jerusalem and destroyed the Jewish Temple, putting a permanent stop to the daily animal sacrifices. Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which holds that some or all of the biblical prophecies concerning the Last Days (or End Times) refer to events which actually happened in the first century after Christs birth. ... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... The Destruction of Jerusalem (specifically, the Second Destruction of Jerusalem) was the culmination of the successful campaign of Titus Flavius against Judea after an unsuccessful attack four years prior by Cestius Gallus. ... For the Gorgoroth album, see Antichrist (album) Antichrist is translated from the Greek αντίχριστος antíkhristos, which literally means opposite of Christ. A broader meaning is in place of Christ. Therefore, antichrist means opposed to Christ by being in the place of Christ. ... In Christian eschatology, the Tribulation is a period of immense suffering, greater than anything before in history, which some claim will occur before the end of the world. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Last Judgement. ... This is about the emperor of ancient Rome. ... Hebrew יְרוּשָׁלַיִם (Yerushalayim) (Standard) Yerushalayim or Yerushalaim Arabic commonly القـُدْس (Al-Quds); officially in Israel أورشليم القدس (Urshalim-Al-Quds) Name Meaning Hebrew: (see below), Arabic: The Holiness Government City District Jerusalem Population 724,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 123,000 dunams (123 km²) Jerusalem (Hebrew:  , Yerushaláyim or Yerushalaim; Arabic:  , al-Quds, the Holiness)[2...


Proponents of Full Preterism do not believe in the bodily Resurrection of the dead and place this event as well as the Second Coming in AD 70, whereas proponents of Partial Preterism do believe in a bodily resurrection of the dead at a future Second Coming. Full preterists contend that those who consider themselves to be partial preterists are actually just futurists since they believe the Second Coming, Resurrection, Rapture and Judgment are still in the future. Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which deals with the position of past-fulfilment of the Last Days (or End Times) prophecies in varying degrees. ... // Main article: Jewish eschatology Orthodox Judaism holds that belief in the Resurrection of the Dead is one of the cardinal principles of the Jewish faith. ... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... Partial preterism is a form of Christian eschatology that holds much in common with but is distinct from Full preterism (or consistent or hyper preterism) in that it places the events of most of the Book of Revelation as occurring during the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD (and/or... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including...


Many preterists believe the first-century living Christians were literally raptured off the earth to be with Christ. At that time, their bodies were changed to be like Christ's. Preterists also believe the term 'Last Days' or 'End Times' refers not to the last days of planet Earth, or last days of mankind, but to the last days of the Old Covenant, the Mosaic Covenant which God had exclusively with Israel until year AD 70. // In Judeo-Christian theology, the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ... // In Judeo-Christian theology, the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ...


According to Preterism, many 'time passages' in the New Testament indicate with apparent certainty that the Second Coming of Christ, and the 'End Times' predicted in the Bible were to take place within the lifetimes of Christ's disciples: Matt. 10:23, Matt. 16:28, Matt. 24:34, Matt. 26:64, Rom. 13:11-12, 1 Cor. 7:29-31, 1 Cor. 10:11, Phil. 4:5, James 5:8-9, 1 Pet. 4:7, 1 Jn. 2:18. Preterism is a variant of Christian eschatology which holds that some or all of the biblical prophecies concerning the Last Days (or End Times) refer to events which actually happened in the first century after Christs birth. ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... // In Judeo-Christian theology, the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... Philippians redirects here. ... The Epistle of James is a book in the Christian New Testament canon. ... (Redirected from 1 Peter) In Christianity, the First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. ... (Redirected from 1 John) The First Epistle of John is a book of the Bible New Testament. ...


Rastafarians

The Rastafari movement believes the end times began with the crowning of Haile Selassie as Emperor of Ethiopia in 1930, and that he will soon reveal himself as God. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Haile Selassie Haile Selassie (Power of Trinity) (July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975) was the last Emperor (1930–1936; 1941–1974) of Ethiopia, and is a religious symbol in the Rastafarian movement. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


They moreover believe that Ethiopian historical events such as the Second Italo-Ethiopian War are prophesied in the Bible. The rastafarians are waiting for Selassie to call the day of judgement, punish the wicked, and take the righteous back to Africa to live in Mount Zion in Africa to live with him forever in perfect peace, love and harmony. The present society in which they find themselves is referred to as Babylon, and will be destroyed on the day of judgement. Italian troops fortify a position in Abyssinia Lasting seven months from 1935-1936, the Second Italo-Abyssinian War is often seen as a precursor to World War II and a demonstration of the inefficiency of the League of Nations. ... Dormition Church, situated on the modern Mount Zion Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Rastafarians have a unique interpretation of the end times, based on the Old Testament and the Book of Revelation. They believe Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie is God incarnate, the King of kings and Lord of lords mentioned in Revelation 5:5. While on the one hand Selassie's crowning was seen as the second coming, and events such as the Second Italo-Ethiopian War were seen as fulfilments of biblical and specifically Revelation prophecy there is also expectation that Selassie will call a day of judgement, when he will bring home the lost children of Israel (the black peoples taken out of Africa during the slave trade) to live with him in peace, love and harmony in the Mount Zion in Africa. Mount Zion is not a place, but the Rastas do believe that they will live there with Selassie in the physical sense of the word; e.g., living in their physical bodies in a physical place. There they will never die. Rasta hairstyle Rastafarianism is a religious movement that believes in the divinity of former emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... Haile Selassie Haile Selassie (Power of Trinity) (July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975) was the last Emperor (1930–1936; 1941–1974) of Ethiopia, and is a religious symbol in the Rastafarian movement. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Incarnation, which literally means enfleshment, refers to the DNA-encoding, conception, and live birth of a sentient creature (generally human) who is the material manifestation of an entity or force whose original nature is immaterial. ... The Second Coming or Last Coming refers to the Christian belief in the coming or earthly return of Jesus Christ to fulfill Messianic prophecy, such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including... Italian troops fortify a position in Abyssinia Lasting seven months from 1935-1936, the Second Italo-Abyssinian War is often seen as a precursor to World War II and a demonstration of the inefficiency of the League of Nations. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Dormition Church, situated on the modern Mount Zion Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Fictional treatments

Varying beliefs about the end times have been the subject of a number of works of fiction. Fiction (from the Latin fingere, to form, create) is storytelling of imagined events and stands in contrast to non-fiction, which makes factual claims about reality. ...


Literature

  • The Left Behind series of novels, comics, and motion pictures, originally by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins, are a fictional telling of these tales from the most popular, Futurist point of view, of an evangelist who wishes to convert people to belief in these prophecies.
  • A rapture of sorts occurs in the novel Job: A Comedy of Justice by Robert A. Heinlein.
  • "The Dead" by Mark E. Rogers depicts a fearful end to Humanity's reign on Earth. A (surprisingly small) number of people are "Raptured" from the face of the Earth - perhaps more controversially than anything else that happens in the book, the Pope is *not* "Raptured" - and the remaining people find themselves coming under increasing attack from reanimated corpses under the control of the Biblical demon, Legion. The corpses are all but unstoppable, being vulnerable only to fire, and continue to attack even when their bodies have suffered traumatic damage. (A bullet to the head will not stop them.) Legion and his host are committed to slaughtering all of Mankind in a series of extremely horrible ways. Technology fails at every level rendering Humanity all but defenceless. This novel could be considered the darkest vision of Mankind's final hours.
  • An end-times novel that depicts a Preterist point of view, entitled The Last Disciple, was written by well-known apologist Hank Hanegraaff (aka "The Bible Answer Man") and Sigmund Brouwer; it was released in Autumn 2004, ironically by the same publisher as the futurist Left Behind series.
  • A contemporary Marian visionary, Michelle Rios Rice, has written a superb account of Marian end-time revelations, "A Time of Fire~A Way of Fire", which argues that we are currently in the end times and that the Battle of Armageddon, which is being fought on many levels, has already begun.
  • The end-times of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos involves the destruction of all we know. Though multiple versions of how it will come to pass exist, one version he mentions comes in his short story The Call of Cthulhu, in which he states...

    "The time would be easy to know, for then mankind would have become as the Great Old Ones; free and wild and beyond good and evil, with laws and morals thrown aside and all men shouting and killing and revelling in joy. Then the liberated Old Ones would teach them new ways to shout and kill and revel and enjoy themselves, and all the earth would flame with a holocaust of ecstasy and freedom."
    —H. P. Lovecraft, "The Call of Cthulhu" For other uses, see Left Behind (disambiguation). ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... A panel from Tim LaHaye’s multi-million selling ‘’Left Behind’’ series, depicting the fate LaHaye anticipates for those who do not follow Jesus Christ. ... Book one in the Left Behind series Jerry B. Jenkins (born September 23, 1949 in Kalamazoo, Michigan) is an American novelist and biographer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Evangelism is the proclaiming of the Christian Gospel. ... In conservative Protestant Christian eschatology, the rapture (harpazo in Greek in 1 Thessalonians 4:17) is the name given to the event in which all Christians living on earth are simultaneously transported to Heaven to be with Jesus Christ. ... Job: A Comedy of Justice is a novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1984. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... This article or section is currently being developed or reviewed. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Left Behind (disambiguation). ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Cthulhu and Rlyeh Cthulhu Mythos is the term coined by the writer August Derleth to describe the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated horror fiction writers. ... The Call of Cthulhu is one of H. P. Lovecrafts best-known short stories, first published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales in February 1928. ... The Great Old Ones (also Old Ones or Cthulhu Cycle Deities) are a group of fictional deities in the Cthulhu mythos of H.P. Lovecraft. ... // Warhammer 40,000 In the fictional universe of Warhammer 40,000, the Old Ones traveled through space and manipulated minor species on several planets to grow into tools for their battle against the Ctan. ... The Call of Cthulhu is one of H. P. Lovecrafts best-known short stories, first published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales in February 1928. ...

    Essentially, humanity will have reverted to pure instinct and desires, and Cthulhu will usher in a new age in his own image.
  • Joel C. Rosenberg's bestselling political thrillers The Last Jihad, The Last Days, The Ezekial Option, and The Copper Scroll deal with the War of Gog and Magog and what will happen in the End Times previous to the rapture. His nonfiction book which recounts the reasoning behind his theories and the current perceived signs that the End Times will come in our generation is called Epicenter.

Cthulhu and Rlyeh Cthulhu (other spellings: Kutulu, Ktulu, Cthulu, Kthulhut, Thu Thu, Tulu[1], and many others) is a fictional entity created by horror author H.P. Lovecraft. ... Joel C. Rosenberg in Jerusalem with the Dome of the Rock in the background. ... The Last Jihad is a novel written by Joel C. Rosenberg. ... The Last Days is an Academy Award winning documentary, directed by James Moll and produced by June Beallor and Ken Lipper in 1998. ...

Television

  • In Buffy The Vampire Slayer and its spinoff Angel, the end of the world is treated less as a religious event and more as a general world-scale cataclysm that will not discriminate between Christians and non-Christians. In these shows, the end of the world is the moment when the Old Ones will return to the world and rule again. In this case, the end of the world is a negative event rather than a positive one.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an American cult television series that aired from March 10, 1997 until May 20, 2003. ... A Gothic angel in ivory, c1250, Louvre An angel is a supernatural being found in many religions. ... In the Buffyverse the Old Ones are the extremely powerful pure-breed demons that once dominated earth before humankind appeared. ...

Motion pictures

  • The motion picture The Omen (1976) and its sequels are predicated on Futurist end-times beliefs.
  • Another such motion picture is The Seventh Sign (1988).
  • The motion picture Rosemary's Baby features the birth of a child of Satan, who is presumably destined to mature into the Antichrist.
  • Alex de la Iglesia's Spanish horror-comedy motion picture "El Día de la Bestia" (Day of the Beast) depicts the efforts of a Basque priest and a young follower of heavy metal music to prevent the birth of the Antichrist.
  • Cloud Ten Pictures has produced three Left Behind movies, the first two based on the same-name books. The third movie, World At War, deviated slightly from the authors' works but retained the same characters and overall storyline. Cloud Ten has also produced various other films depicting a futuristic view of the End Times.
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger in the movie End of Days...
  • The quintessential End Times film might be The Rapture (1991).

For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A sequel is a work of fiction in literature, film, and other creative works that is produced after a completed work, and is set in the same universe but at a later time. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Seventh Sign is a 1988 film written by Clifford and Ellen Green and directed by Carl Schultz. ... Rosemarys Baby is a 1967 horror novel by Ira Levin which deals with Rosemary, a housewife in New York City who is a native of Omaha, Nebraska. ... Álex de la Iglesia (born December 4, 1965) is a Spanish film director. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... Languages Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers [4] other native languages Religions Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: Euskaldunak) are an indigenous people[] who inhabit parts of both Spain and France. ... . ... Heavy metal (sometimes referred to simply as metal) is a genre of rock music that developed between 1968 and 1974. ... Cloud Ten Pictures is a film production company located in St. ... End of Days is a 1999 action/horror film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and directed by Peter Hyams. ... The Rapture is an American rock band based in New York City. ...

See also

Yawm al-Qīyāmah (Arabic: ‎ literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Arabic name for the Last Judgement. ... End of the world may refer to: The ultimate fate of the universe, in cosmology The end of planet Earth, ultimate fate of planet Earth Risks to civilization, humans and planet Earth, future doomsday scenarios covering the end of civilization, humanity or the planet. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... for Christians who belong to Zionist denominations in southern Africa, see Zionist Churches Christian Zionism is a belief among some Christians that the return of the Jews to the Holy Land, and the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, is in accordance with Biblical prophecy. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Mahdi (disambiguation). ... Mysticism from the Greek μυστικός (mystikos) an initiate (of the Eleusinian Mysteries, μυστήρια (mysteria) meaning initiation[1]) is the pursuit of achieving communion or identity with, or conscious awareness of, ultimate reality, the divine, spiritual truth, or God through direct experience, intuition, or insight; and the belief that such experience is an... St. ... Yawm al-Qīyāmah (Arabic: ‎ literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... The ultimate fate of the universe is a topic in physical cosmology. ... Apocalypticism is a worldview based on the idea that important matters are esoteric in nature (hidden) and they will soon be revealed in a major confrontation of earth-shaking magnitude that will change the course of history. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual Organisation, also known as the Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual Organization, Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University (BKWSU), or Prajapita Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa Vidyalaya. Teachers of a form of meditation, or spirit channeling, called Raja Yoga [not to be confused with classical Patanjalis Raja Yoga... Barry Smith Barry Rumsey Smith (10 May 1933- 27 June 2002) was a preacher and author from New Zealand. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Number of the Beast is a concept from the Book of Revelation of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

References

  • Boyer, Paul. When Time Shall Be No More: Prophecy Belief in Modern American Culture. ISBN 0-674-95129-8
  • Graham, Billy. Approaching Hoofbeats: The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. ISBN 0-380-69921-4
  • Lindsey, Hal. The Late Great Planet Earth (1970 Bantam edition, seventeenth printing); current ISBN 0-310-27771-X
  • Lindsey, Hal. The 1980s: Countdown to Armageddon (1981), ISBN B00005VA37
  • Oropeza, B. J. 99 Reasons Why Nobody Knows When Christ Will Return, ISBN 0-8308-1636-4
  • Perry, Richard. "Of The Last Days: Listen, I Tell You A Mystery" (2003): ISBN 1-55306-656-1
  • Ruthven, Jon. The Prophecy That Is Shaping History: New Research on Ezekiel's Vision of the End. ISBN 1-59160-214-9

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Harold Lee Hal Lindsey (born 1929) is an American evangelist and Christian writer. ...

Dispensationalist commentary

Jerry Lamon Falwell (born August 11, 1933, in Lynchburg, Virginia) is an evangelical pastor and televangelist from the United States. ... H:For other uses of King James Version, see King James Version (disambiguation). ... A study Bible. ... Cyrus Ingerson Scofield (1843-1921) was an American lawyer and Bible scholar. ... The Scofield Reference Bible is a widely circulated annotated study Bible edited and annotated by the American Bible student Cyrus I. Scofield. ...

Further reading

  • Bigalke Jr., Ron J., One World: Economy, Government, and Religion in the Last Days. (ISBN 0-9749811-8-4)
  • Cohn, Norman, The Pursuit of the Millennium: Revolutionary Millennarians and Mystical Anarchists of the Middle Ages. ISBN 0-19-500456-6
  • DeMar, Gary. Last Days Madness: Obsession of the Modern Church. ISBN 0-915815-35-4
  • Heindel, Max, How Shall We Know Christ at His Coming?, May 1913 (stenographic report of a lecture, Los Angeles), ISBN 0-911274-64-2
  • LaHaye, Tim and Jenkins, Jerry, Are We Living in the End Times? ISBN 0-8423-3644-3
  • Lewis, Frederick E., Understanding the Bible and End Times ISBN 1-59886-386-X
  • Matson, Daniel W., Signs of the End: A Discovery of Biblical Timelines. www
  • Pearce, Tony, The Omega Files, New Wine Press, ISBN 1-903725-18-6 www
  • Riddlebarger, Kim, A Case for Amillennialism: Understanding the End Times. ISBN 0-8010-6435-X
  • Robbins, Thomas and Palmer, Susan J., Millennium, Messiahs, and Mayhem: Contemporary Apocalyptic Movements. ISBN 0-415-91649-6
  • Sliker, David, End-Times Simplified: Preparing Your Heart for the Coming Storm. ISBN 0977673804
  • Sproul, R. C., The Last Days According to Jesus. ISBN 0-8010-6340-X

Max Heindel (1865-1919) Max Heindel - born Carl Louis von Grasshoff in Aarhus, Denmark on July 23, 1865 - was a Christian occultist, astrologer, and mystic. ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type mayor-council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D)  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  465. ... A panel from Tim LaHaye’s multi-million selling ‘’Left Behind’’ series, depicting the fate LaHaye anticipates for those who do not follow Jesus Christ. ... Jerry B. Jenkins (born September 23, 1949 in Kalamazoo, Michigan) is a novelist and biographer whose books usually feature evangelical Christians as protagonists. ... R.C. Sproul Dr. Robert Charles Sproul (born 1939 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American, Calvinist theologian, and pastor. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
End times - Theopedia (321 words)
End times is a popular term used when referring to various interpretations of the Book of Revelation and other prophetic parts of the Bible, such as the Book of Daniel and various sayings of Jesus in the Gospels concerning the timing of Christ's Second Coming and the establishment of his kingdom.
Carson, is that that the end times were inaugurated at the death and resurrection of Jesus, yet the complete fulfillment of the end times remains future, with a tension between that which has already and not yet come to pass.
The study of "end times", known as eschatology (from the Greek eskhatos meaning last things), is a subject that includes such topics as death and the afterlife, the Second Coming of Christ, the Millennial Kingdom, the end of the world, resurrection of the dead, Heaven and Hell, and new creation.
End of Times.net (544 words)
During that time, an individual (the Mahdi), with the attribute of al-Hadi (one who guides), will be the means whereby atheistic philosophies and ideologies will disappear and the cruelty and conflict currently being experienced all over the world will come to an end.
The beginning of the end times is described in the hadiths as a state of chaos in which strife, wars and tribulations constantly increase, in which there is terrible moral degeneration all over the world, and in which people live far removed from religious values.
The Golden Age will be a time when war and conflict comes to an end, when those atheistic ideologies that wreaked such dreadful damage on mankind will finally be consigned to the waste bin of history, when Islamic morality spreads over the whole world, and when people turn in their millions to religion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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