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Emu

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Struthioniformes
Family: Casuariidae
Genus: Dromaius
Species: D. novaehollandiae
Binomial name
Dromaius novaehollandiae
(Latham, 1790)
The Emu has been recorded in the areas shown in orange.
The Emu has been recorded in the areas shown in orange.
Synonyms

Dromiceius novaehollandiae For other uses, see EMU. Binomial name (Latham, 1790) The Emu has been recorded in the areas shown in orange. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1067x1600, 656 KB) Emu, Melbourne Zoo If you are a (commercial) publisher and you want me to write you an email or paper mail giving you an authorization to use my works in your products or a license with the terms... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn3. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Families Struthionidae (ostriches) Rheidae (rheas) Casuariidae (emus etc. ... Genera Casuarius Dromaius For fossil forms, see article The bird family Casuariidae has four surviving members: the three species of cassowary, and the only remaining species of Emu. ... Species Dromaius novaehollandiae Dromaius baudinianus (extinct) Dromaius ater (extinct) Note that the acronym EMU has several meanings. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Latham John Latham (June 27, 1740 - February 4, 1837) was an English physician, naturalist and author. ... Image File history File links Dromaius_novaehollandiae_map_distribution_2. ... In scientific nomenclature, synonyms are different scientific names used for a single taxon. ...

The Emu (pronunciation: IPA: /ˈiːmjuː/[1][2]), Dromaius novaehollandiae, is the largest bird native to Australia and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. It is also the second-largest extant bird in the world by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. The soft-feathered, brown, flightless birds reach up to 2 m (6 ft) in height. The Emu is common over most of mainland Australia, although it avoids heavily populated areas, dense forest and arid areas. Emus can travel great distances at a fast, economical trot and, if necessary, can sprint at 50 km/h (30 mph) for some distance at a time.[3] They are opportunistically nomadic and may travel long distances to find food; they feed on a variety of plants and insects. For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... In biology, extant taxon is commonly used in discussions of living and fossil species. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Species Dromaius novaehollandiae Dromaius baudinianus (extinct) Dromaius ater (extinct) Note that the acronym EMU has several meanings. ... Families Struthionidae (ostriches) Rheidae (rheas) Casuariidae (emus etc. ... // Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus, 1758 The present-day distribution of Ostriches. ... Flightless birds evolved from flying ancestors; there are about forty species in existence today. ... Kilometres per hour (American spelling: kilometers per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ...


The Emu subspecies that previously inhabited Tasmania became extinct following the European settlement of Australia in 1788; the distribution of the mainland subspecies has also been affected by human activities. Once common on the east coast, Emu are now uncommon; by contrast, the development of agriculture and the provision of water for stock in the interior of the continent have increased the range of the Emu in arid regions. Emus are farmed for their meat, oil and leather. Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... // Following the loss of the American Colonies, Britain needed to find alternative destinations that could take the population of its overcrowded prisons. ... Emu oil is an oil made from the Emu. ...

Contents

Taxonomy and distribution

The emu was first described under the name of the New Holland Cassowary in Arthur Phillip's Voyage to Botany Bay, published in 1789.[4] The species was named by ornithologist John Latham, who collaborated on Phillip's book and provided the first descriptions of and names for many Australian bird species; its name is Latin for "fast-footed New Hollander". The etymology of the common name Emu is uncertain, but is thought to have come from an Arabic word for large bird that was later used by Portuguese explorers to describe the related Cassowary in New Guinea.[5] In Victoria, some terms for the emu were Barrimal in the Djadja wurrung language, myoure in Gunai, and courn in Jardwadjali.[6] Admiral Arthur Phillip RN (11 October 1738 – 31 August 1814) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator. ... John Latham John Latham (June 27, 1740 - February 4, 1837) was an English physician, naturalist and author. ... In botanical nomenclature, the ICBN prescribes a two-part name or binary name for any taxon below the rank of genus down to, and including the rank of species. ... Map of a part of New Holland made by William Dampier in 1699 New Holland is a historic name for the island continent of Australia. ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the scientific study of insects. ... Species Casuarius casuarius Casuarius unappendiculatus Casuarius bennetti Cassowaries (genus Casuarius) are very large flightless birds native to the tropical forests of New Guinea and northeastern Australia. ... The Gunai or Kurnai is one of the Aboriginal nations of Australia. ...


In his original 1816 description of the emu, Vieillot used two generic names; first Dromiceius, then Dromaius a few pages later. It has been a point of contention ever since which is correct; the latter is more correctly formed, but the convention in taxonomy is that the first name given stands, unless it is clearly a typographical error.[7] Most modern publications, including those of the Australian government,[8] use Dromaius, with Dromiceius mentioned as an alternative spelling. Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot (May 10, 1748 - 1831) was a French ornithologist. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Taxonomy, sometimes alpha taxonomy, is the science of finding, describing and naming organisms, thus giving rise to taxa. ... It has been suggested that Fat finger be merged into this article or section. ...


Classification

The Emu is classified in the family with their closest relatives the Cassowaries in the family Casuariidae in the ratite order Struthioniformes. However an alternate classification has been proposed splitting the Casuariidae into their own order Casuariformes. Species Casuarius casuarius Casuarius unappendiculatus Casuarius bennetti Cassowaries (genus Casuarius) are very large flightless birds native to the tropical forests of New Guinea and Australia. ... Genera Casuarius Dromaius For fossil forms, see article The bird family Casuariidae has four surviving members: the three species of cassowary, and the only remaining species of Emu. ... Families Struthionidae Casuariidae Dinornithidae Apterygidae Rheidae A ratite is any of a diverse group of large, flightless birds of Gondwanian origin, most of them now extinct. ...


Three different Dromaius species were common in Australia before European settlement, and one species is known from fossils. The small emus — Dromaius baudinianus and D. ater — both became extinct shortly after; however, the Emu, D. novaehollandiae, remains common. The population varies from decade to decade, largely dependent on rainfall; it is estimated that the Emu population is 625,000–725,000, with 100,000–200,000 in Western Australia and the remainder mostly in New South Wales and Queensland.[5] D. novaehollandiae diemenensis, a subspecies known as the Tasmanian Emu, became extinct around 1865. Emus were introduced to Maria Island off Tasmania and Kangaroo Island near South Australia during the 20th century. The Kangaroo Island birds have established a breeding population there. The Maria Island population became extinct in the mid-1990s. Species Dromaius novaehollandiae Dromaius baudinianus (extinct) Dromaius ater (extinct) Note that the acronym EMU has several meanings. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Binomial name Dromaius ater (Vieillot, 1817) Synonyms Dromaius novaehollandiae minor Spencer, 1906 Dromaius bassi Legge, 1907 Dromaius spenceri (partim) Mathews, 1912 Dromaius novaehollandiae ater The King Island Emu or Black Emu (Dromaius ater) is an extinct ratite species which occurred on King Island between Australia and Tasmania. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of species. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... NSW redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... Trinomial name Dromaius novaehollandiae diemenensis Le Souef, 1907 Synonyms Dromaeius diemenensis (lapsus) Le Souef, 1907 Dromaeius novaehollandiae diemenensis (lapsus) The Tasmanian Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae diemenensis) is an extinct subspecies of the Emu. ... Maria Island is a relatively small island about 10 km off the east coast of Tasmania. ... Kangaroo Island is Australias third largest island - after Tasmania and Melville Island. ...


There are three extant subspecies in Australia: This article is about the zoological term. ...

  • In the southeast, D. novaehollandiae novaehollandiae, with its whitish ruff when breeding;
  • In the north, D. novaehollandiae woodwardi, slender and paler; and
  • In the southwest, D. novaehollandiae rothschildi, darker, with no ruff during breeding.

Description

Emus have only three toes in a tridactyl arrangement; this adaptation for running is seen in other bird species, such as bustards and quails. The Ostrich has only two toes
Emus have only three toes in a tridactyl arrangement; this adaptation for running is seen in other bird species, such as bustards and quails. The Ostrich has only two toes

Emus are large birds. The largest individuals can reach up to two metres (6 ft 7 inches) in height (1–1.3 metres (3.2–4.3 ft) at the shoulder) and weigh between 30 and 45 kilograms (66–100 pounds).[5] They have small vestigial wings and a long neck and legs. Their ability to run at high speeds is due to their highly specialised pelvic limb musculature. Their feet have only three toes and a similarly reduced number of bones and associated foot muscles; they are the only birds with gastrocnemius muscles in the back of the lower legs. The pelvic limb muscles of Emus have a similar contribution to total body mass as the flight muscles of flying birds.[9] Image File history File links Emu_feet. ... Image File history File links Emu_feet. ... In biology, dactyly is the arrangement of digits (fingers and toes) on the hands, feet, or sometimes wings of an animal. ... Genera See text. ... Genera Coturnix Anurophasis Perdicula Ophrysia † See also Pheasant, Partridge, Grouse Quail is a collective name for several genera of mid-sized birds in the pheasant family Phasianidae, or in the family Odontophoridae. ... // Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus, 1758 The present-day distribution of Ostriches. ... The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lbm, or sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass (sometimes called weight in everyday parlance) in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The human vermiform appendix is a vestigial structure; it no longer retains its original function. ... The Gastrocnemius (pronounced ) muscle is a powerful superficial muscle that is in the back part of the lower leg (the calf). ...


Emus have brown to grey-brown plumage of shaggy appearance; the shafts and the tips of the feathers are black. Solar radiation is absorbed by the tips, and the loose-packed inner plumage insulates the skin. The resultant heat is prevented from flowing to the skin by the insulation provided by the coat,[10] allowing the bird to be active during the heat of the day. A unique feature of the Emu feather is its double rachis emerging from a single shaft. The sexes are similar in appearance. Two feathers Feathers are one of the epidermal growths that form the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on birds. ... Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ...


On very hot days, Emus pant to maintain their body temperature, their lungs work as evaporative coolers and, unlike some other species, the resulting low levels of carbon dioxide in the blood do not appear to cause alkalosis.[11] For normal breathing in cooler weather, they have large, multifolded nasal passages. Cool air warms as it passes through into the lungs, extracting heat from the nasal region. On exhalation, the Emu's cold nasal turbinates condense moisture back out of the air and absorb it for reuse.[12] Thermoregulation is the ability of an organism to keep its body temperature within certain boundaries, even when temperature surrounding is very different. ... “Vaporization” redirects here. ... Carbon dioxide is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ... Alkalosis refers to a condition reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma. ... In anatomy, a turbinate (or nasal concha) is a long, narrow and curled bone shelf (shaped like an elongated sea-shell) which protrudes into the breathing passage of the nose. ...


Their calls consist of loud booming, drumming and grunting sounds that can be heard up to two kilometers away. The booming sound is created in an inflatable neck sac.[5]


Ecology and behaviour

Emu eyes are golden brown to black. The naked skin on the neck is bluish-black

Emus live in most habitats across Australia, although they are most common in areas of sclerophyll forest and savanna woodland, and least common in populated and very arid areas. Emus are largely solitary, and while they can form enormous flocks, this is an atypical social behaviour that arises from the common need to move towards food sources. Emus have been shown to travel long distances to reach abundant feeding areas. In Western Australia, Emu movements follow a distinct seasonal pattern — north in summer and south in winter. On the east coast their wanderings do not appear to follow a pattern.[13] Emus are also able to swim when necessary. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1380x1035, 205 KB) Beschreibung Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Emu The Mep Report Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1380x1035, 205 KB) Beschreibung Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Emu The Mep Report Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Arid, largely treeless areas aside, most Australian bushland is sclerophyll forest. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person...


Diet

Emus forage in a diurnal pattern. They eat a variety of native and introduced plant species; the type of plants eaten depends on seasonal availability. They also eat insects, including grasshoppers and crickets, lady birds, soldier and saltbush caterpillars, Bogong and cotton-boll moth larvae and ants.[14] In Western Australia, food preferences have been observed in travelling Emus: they eat seeds from Acacia aneura until it rains, after which they eat fresh grass shoots and caterpillars; in winter they feed on the leaves and pods of Cassia; in spring, they feed on grasshoppers and quandong fruit.[3] Emus may serve as an important agent for the dispersal of large viable seeds, which could contribute to the maintenance of floral biodiversity.[15] Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Grasshopper (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies See Taxonomy section Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as true crickets), are insects somewhat related to grasshoppers and more closely related to katydids or bush crickets (family Tettigoniidae). ... Ladybird and ladybug redirect here. ... Binomial name Agrotis infusa (bogong moth) , Subspecies The Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa) is a temperate species of night-flying moth notable for appearing in major proportions around major public buildings in Canberra, the capital city of Australia, during spring (late September to November). ... Heliothis is a genus of moths, whose larvae are agricultural pests on the crop species tobacco, cotton and soybean. ... Binomial name F.Muell. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees Cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum, synonym ), also called Chinese cinnamon, is an evergreen tree native to southern China and mainland Southeast Asia west to Myanmar. ... A Desert Quandong nut sitting on a piece of paperbark. ...


Reproduction

Emu chicks have distinctive bilateral stripes that help to camouflage them
Emu chicks have distinctive bilateral stripes that help to camouflage them

Emus form breeding pairs during the summer months of December and January, and may remain together for about five months. Mating occurs in the cooler months of May and June. During the breeding season, males experience hormonal changes, including an increase in luteinizing hormone and testosterone levels, and their testicles double in size.[16] Males lose their appetite and construct a rough nest in a semi-sheltered hollow on the ground from bark, grass, sticks and leaves. The pair mates every day or two, and every second or third day the female lays an average of 11 (and as many as 20) very large, thick-shelled, dark-green eggs. The eggs are on average 134 x 89 millimeters (5.3 x 3.5 inches) and weigh between 700 and 900 grams (1.5–2 pounds),[17] which is roughly equivalent to 10–12 chicken eggs in volume and weight. The first verified occurrence of genetically identical avian twins was demonstrated in the Emu.[18] Download high resolution version (801x651, 148 KB)Baby Emu - Taken at Beacon Hill Park, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. ... Download high resolution version (801x651, 148 KB)Baby Emu - Taken at Beacon Hill Park, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. ... Luteinizing hormone (LH) is a hormone synthesized and secreted by gonadotropes in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland. ... Testosterone is a steroid hormone from the androgen group. ... Human male anatomy The testicles, known medically as testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ...


The male becomes broody after his mate starts laying, and begins to incubate the eggs before the laying period is complete. From this time on, he does not eat, drink or defecate, and stands only to turn the eggs, which he does about 10 times a day. Over eight weeks of incubation, he will lose a third of his weight and will survive only on stored body-fat and on any morning dew that he can reach from the nest. As with many other Australian birds, such as the Superb Fairy-wren, infidelity is the norm for Emus, despite the initial pair-bond: once the male starts brooding, the female mates with other males and may lay in multiple clutches; thus, as many as half the chicks in a brood may be fathered by others, or by neither parent as Emus also exhibit brood parasitism.[19] Some females stay and defend the nest until the chicks start hatching, but most leave the nesting area completely to nest again; in a good season, a female Emu may nest three times.[13] Binomial name Ellis, 1782 Superb Fairy-wren range  ;   Subspecies The Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus), also known as Superb Blue-wren or colloquially as Blue wren, is the best-known of all fairy-wrens, and found in a wide range of habitat types in south-eastern Australia. ... A Common Cuckoo being raised by a Reed Warbler. ...


Incubation takes 56 days, and the male stops incubating the eggs shortly before they hatch.[13] Newly hatched chicks are active and can leave the nest within a few days. They stand about 25 centimetres tall and have distinctive brown and cream stripes for camouflage, which fade after three months or so. The male stays with the growing chicks for up to 18 months, defending them and teaching them how to find food.[17] Chicks grow very quickly and are full-grown in 12–14 months; they may remain with their family group for another six months or so before they split up to breed in their second season. In the wild, Emus live between 10 to 20 years;[20] captive birds can live longer than those in the wild


Relationship with humans

Conservation status

Emus were used as a source of food by indigenous Australians and early European settlers. Aborigines used a variety of techniques to catch the bird, including spearing them while they drank at waterholes, poisoning waterholes, catching Emus in nets, and attracting Emus by imitating their calls or with a ball of feathers and rags dangled from a tree.[17] Europeans killed Emus to provide food and to remove them if they interfered with farming or invaded settlements in search of water during drought. An extreme example of this was the Emu War in Western Australia in 1932, when Emus that flocked to Campion during a hot summer scared the town’s inhabitants and an unsuccessful attempt to drive them off was mounted. In John Gould's Handbook to the Birds of Australia, first published in 1865, he laments the loss of the Emu from Tasmania, where it had become rare and has since become extinct; he notes that Emus were no longer common in the vicinity of Sydney and proposes that the species be given protected status.[4] Wild Emus are formally protected in Australia under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Languages Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religions Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group names Indigenous... The Emu War was a week-long military operation undertaken in Australia in 1932 to address public concern over the number of emus said to be running amok in the Murchison district of Western Australia. ... John Gould John Gould (14 September 1804 – 3 February 1881) was an English ornithologist. ... The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is an Act of the Parliament of Australia that provides a framework for protection of the Australian environment, including its biodiversity and its natural and culturally significant places. ...


Although the population of Emus on mainland Australia is thought to be higher now than before European settlement,[5] some wild populations are at risk of local extinction due to small population size. Threats to small populations include the clearance and fragmentation of areas of habitat; deliberate slaughter; collisions with vehicles; and predation of the young and eggs by foxes, feral and domestic dogs, and feral pigs. The isolated Emu population of the New South Wales North Coast Bioregion and Port Stephens is listed as endangered by the New South Wales Government.[21] Port Stephens Council () is a Local Government Area (LGA) on Port Stephens in New South Wales, Australia on the Pacific Highway. ...


Economic value

The Emu was an important source of meat to the Aborigines in the areas to which it was endemic. Emu fat was used as bush medicine, and was rubbed on the skin. It also served as a valuable lubricant. It was mixed with ochre to make the traditional paint for ceremonial body adornment, as well as to oil wooden tools and utensils such as the coolamon.[22] The Ochre Pits The Ochre Pits are a popular tourist destination in the Northern Territory, Australia, approximately 50 kilometres west of Alice Springs along the Larapinta Trail. ... The coolamon in this picture is at top left. ...


An example of how the Emu was cooked comes from the Arrernte of Central Australia who call it Kere ankerre: Arrente is both a language, a group of people, and an area of land in Central Australia. ... Central Australia is a term used to describe the area of land surrounding and including Alice Springs in Australia. ...

Emus are around all the time, in green times and dry times. You pluck the feathers out first, then pull out the crop from the stomach, and put in the feathers you've pulled out, and then singe it on the fire. You wrap the milk guts that you've pulled out into something [such as] gum leaves and cook them. When you've got the fat off, you cut the meat up and cook it on fire made from river red gum wood.[23]
Farmed Emu at Virginia's Emu Marketing Cooperative near Warrenton, Virginia, US.
Farmed Emu at Virginia's Emu Marketing Cooperative near Warrenton, Virginia, US.

Commercial Emu farming started in Western Australia in 1987 and the first slaughtering occurred in 1990.[24] In Australia, the commercial industry is based on stock bred in captivity and all states except Tasmania have licensing requirements to protect wild Emus. Outside Australia, Emus are farmed on a large scale in North America, with about 1 million birds in the US,[25] Peru and China, and to a lesser extent in some other countries. Emus breed well in captivity, and are kept in large open pens to avoid leg and digestive problems that arise with inactivity. They are typically fed on grain supplemented by grazing, and are slaughtered at 50–70 weeks of age. They eat two times a day and prefer 5 pounds of leaves each meal. Binomial name Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. ... Image File history File links Feeding_farmed_Emu. ... Image File history File links Feeding_farmed_Emu. ... Street scene, Warrenton, Virginia, ca. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


Emus are farmed primarily for their meat, leather and oil. Emu meat is a low-fat, low-cholesterol meat (85 mg/100 g); despite being avian, it is considered a red meat because of its red colour and pH value.[26][25] The best cuts come from the thigh and the larger muscles of the drum or lower leg. Emu fat is rendered to produce oil for cosmetics, dietary supplements and therapeutic products. There is some evidence that the oil has anti-inflammatory properties;[27] however, the US Food and Drug Administration regards pure emu oil product as an unapproved drug. Emu leather has a distinctive patterned surface, due to a raised area around the feather follicles in the skin; the leather is used in such small items as wallets and shoes, often in combination with other leathers. The feathers and eggs are used in decorative arts and crafts. Emu oil is an oil made from the Emu. ... Red meat in culinary terminology refers to meat which is red-colored when raw, while in nutritional terminology, it refers to meat from mammals. ... “FDA” redirects here. ...


Cultural references

New South Wales 100th Anniversary stamp
New South Wales 100th Anniversary stamp

The Emu has a prominent place in Australian Aboriginal mythology, including a creation myth of the Yuwaalaraay and other groups in NSW who say that the sun was made by throwing an Emu's egg into the sky; the bird features in numerous aetiological stories told across a number of Aboriginal groups.[28] The Kurdaitcha man of Central Australia is said to wear sandals made of emu feathers to mask his footprints. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Gamilaraay or Kamilaroi language is a Pama-Nyungan language of the Wiradhuric subgroup found mostly in South East Australia. ... This article is about the medical term. ... Kurdaitcha (or kurdaitcha man) is a ritual executioner in Aboriginal Australian culture. ... Central Australia is a term used to describe the area of land surrounding and including Alice Springs in Australia. ...


The Emu is popularly but unofficially considered as a faunal emblem—the national bird of Australia.[29] It appears as a shield bearer on the Coat of Arms of Australia with the Red Kangaroo and as a part of the Arms also appears on the Australian 50 cent coin. It has featured on numerous Australian postage stamps, including a pre-federation New South Wales 100th Anniversary issue from 1888, which featured a 2 pence blue Emu stamp, a 36 cent stamp released in 1986, and a $1.35 stamp released in 1994. The hats of the Australian Light Horse were famously decorated with an Emu feather plume. Australian Coat of Arms (since 1912) The Coat of Arms of Australia is the official symbol of Australia. ... Binomial name Desmarest, 1822 The Red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus) is the largest of all kangaroos and the largest surviving marsupial. ... Coins of the Australian dollar were introduced on 14 February 1966. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... For the NBA basketball player with the nickname see Penny Hardaway A variety of low value coins, including an Irish 2p piece and many U.S. pennies. ... Alternate meaning: Lighthorse (American Indian police) The Australian Light Horse soldiers were mounted infantry who served during the Boer War and World War I. The Light Horse differed from cavalry in that they usually fought dismounted, using their horses as transport to the battlefield and as a means of swift...


There are around 600 gazetted places named after the Emu in Australia, including mountains, lakes, creeks and towns.[30] During the 19th and 20th centuries, many Australian companies and household products were named after the bird; for example, in Western Australia, Emu branded beer has been produced since the early 20th century. The Swan Brewery continues to produce a range of Emu branded beers. Emu - Austral Ornithology is the quarterly peer-reviewed publication of the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union, also known as Birds Australia. The Gazetteer of Australia is a register of the location and spelling of geographical names across Australia. ... The old Swan brewery buildings viewed from the Narrows The Swan Brewery (, ) was founded in the centre of Perth, Australia in 1837. ... Emu Bitter logo Emu is a beer label owned by brewed by the Lion Nathan at the Swan Brewery in Western Australia. ... Emu, subtitled Austral Ornithology (ISSN 0158-4197), is the peer-reviewed scientific journal of the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union (RAOU). ... Australia The Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union was founded in 1901 to promote the study and conservation of the native bird species of Australia, making it the oldest national birding association of that country. ...


See also

Look up emu in
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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Australia has about 800 species of bird, ranging from the tiny 8 cm Weebill to the huge, flightless Emu. ... The Red Kangaroo is the largest macropod and is one of Australias heraldic animals, appearing with the Emu on the Coat of Arms of Australia. ...

References

  1. ^ Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary
  2. ^ American Heritage Dictionary
  3. ^ a b Davies, S. J. J. F. 1963. Emus. Australian Natural History 14:225–29
  4. ^ a b Gould, J. 1865. Handbook to the Birds of Australia Volume 2. Reprinted in 1972 by Landsdowne Press
  5. ^ a b c d e Australian Museum. 2001. Emu Dromaius novaehollandiae
  6. ^ Wesson, Sue C. (2001). Aboriginal flora and fauna names of Victoria: As extracted from early surveyors' reports. Melbourne: Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages. Retrieved on 2006-11-11. 
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ Patak, A. E. and Baldwin, J. 1998 Pelvic limb musculature in the emu Dromaius novaehollandiae (Aves : Struthioniformes: Dromaiidae): Adaptations to high-speed running. Journal of Morphology 238:23–37 PMID 9768501
  10. ^ Maloney, S. K. and Dawson, T. J. 1995. The heat load from solar radiation on a large, diurnally active bird, the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). Journal of Thermal Biology 20:381–87
  11. ^ Maloney, S.K. and Dawson, T.J. 1994. Thermoregulation in a large bird, the Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. B, Biochemical Systemic and Environmental Physiology. 164:464–72
  12. ^ Maloney, S.K. and Dawson, T.J. 1998. Ventilatory accommodation of oxygen demand and respiratory water loss in a large bird, the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), and a re-examination of ventilatory allometry for birds. Physiological Zoology 71:712–19
  13. ^ a b c Davies, S. J. J. F. 1976. The natural history of the Emu in comparison with that of other ratites. In Proceedings of the 16th international ornithological congress, H.J. Firth and J. H. Calaby eds. Australian Academy of Science, p. 109–20 ISBN 0-85847-038-1
  14. ^ Barker, R. D. and Vertjens, W. J. M. The Food of Australian Birds 1 Non-Passerines. CSIRO Australia ISBN 0-643-05007-8
  15. ^ McGrath, R. J. and Bass, D. 1999. Seed dispersal by Emus on the New South Wales north-east coast. EMU 99: 248–52
  16. ^ Malecki I. A. et al. 1998. Endocrine and testicular changes in a short-day seasonally breeding bird, the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), in southwestern Australia. Animal Reproduction Sciences 53:143–55 PMID 9835373
  17. ^ a b c Reader's Digest Complete Book of Australian Birds. 1976. Reader's Digest Services ISBN 0-909486-63-8
  18. ^ Bassett, S. M. et al. 1999. Genetically identical avian twins. Journal of Zoology 247: 475–78
  19. ^ Taylor, E. L. et al. 2000. Genetic evidence for mixed parentage in nests of the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology 47:359–64
  20. ^ Parks Victoria. Emu
  21. ^ Department of Environment and Conservation (NSW) Emu population in the NSW North Coast Bioregion and Port Stephens LGA - profile
  22. ^ South Australia Memory
  23. ^ Turner, Margaret-Mary, Arrernte Foods: Foods from Central Australia, IAD Press, Alice Springs, 1994, ISBN 0-949659-76-2 p47
  24. ^ O'Malley, P. 1997. Emu Farming in The New Rural Industries. Rural Industries Research & Development Corporation
  25. ^ a b USDA. Ratites (Emu, Ostrich, and Rhea)
  26. ^ USDA. 2005. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18 Emu, full rump, raw
  27. ^ Yoganathan, S. et al. 2003. Antagonism of croton oil inflammation by topical emu oil in CD-1 mice. Lipids 38:603–07. PMID 12934669
  28. ^ Dixon, R. B. 1916. Oceanic Mythology Part V. Australia
  29. ^ Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Australia's Coat of Arms
  30. ^ Geoscience Australia. 2004. Gazetteer of Australia

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikispecies has information related to:
  • BirdLife International (2004). Dromaius novaehollandiae. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 9 May 2006. Database entry includes justification for why this species is of least concern
  • Emu chicks emerging, article with sound clips, photos and videos.
  • "Kangaroo feathers" and the Australian Light Horse from the Australian War Memorial
  • Emu videos on the Internet Bird Collection

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... Image File history File links Emu. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... The Australian War Memorial is Australias national memorial to the members of all its armed forces and supporting organisations who have died or participated in the wars of the Commonwealth of Australia. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Birds - Emu (761 words)
Adult Emus are covered with shaggy grey-brown feathers except for the neck and head, which are largely naked and bluish-fl.
It is estimated that the Emu population is 625,000-725,000, with 100,000-200,000 in Western Australia and the majority of remaining populations in New South Wales and Queensland.
Emus are nearly fully grown at one year, and may breed at 20 months.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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