FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Empress Shotoku of Japan

Empress Kōken (孝謙天皇) or Shōtoku (称徳天皇) (718-770) was the 46th imperial ruler of Japan. She first ruled as Kōken from 749 to 758. She abdicated in favor of her second cousin, Junnin, but six years later she took the crown from him and reascended the throne. Her posthumus name for her second reign (764-770) was Shōtoku.


Today, she is remembered chiefly for conducting an affair with a Buddhist monk named Dokyo, a man on whom she heaped titles and power. The affair illustrated the growing power of the Buddhist priesthood and was a prime factor in Emperor Kammu's decision to move the capital away from Nara in 784.


Shotoku died of smallpox, after which she was succeeded by her first cousin twice removed, Emperor Konin. She should not be confused with Prince Shotoku (572-622), who was one of the first in Japan to sponsor Buddhism.

Preceded by:
Shomu
Empress of Japan Succeeded by:
Junnin
Preceded by:
Junnin
Empress of Japan Succeeded by:
Konin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Empress Koken - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (222 words)
Her posthumus name for her second reign (764-770) was Empress Shōtoku.
She should not be confused with Prince Shōtoku (572-622), who was one of the first in Japan to sponsor Buddhism.
Japanese dates correspond to the traditional lunisolar calendar used in Japan until 1873.
Empress Shotoku of Japan - definition of Empress Shotoku of Japan in Encyclopedia (186 words)
Empress Kōken (孝謙天皇) or Shōtoku (称徳天皇) (718-770) was the 46th imperial ruler of Japan.
Shotoku died of smallpox, after which she was succeeded by her first cousin twice removed, Emperor Konin.
She should not be confused with Prince Shotoku (572-622), who was one of the first in Japan to sponsor Buddhism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m