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Encyclopedia > Emperor Wu of Jin
Jin Wudi (晉武帝)
Family name: Sima (司馬; sī mǎ)
Given name: Yan (炎, yán)
Temple name: Shizu (世祖, shì zǔ)
Posthumous name: Wu (武, wǔ), literary meaning: "martial"

Emperor Wu of Jin, sim. ch. 晋武帝, trad. ch. 晉武帝, py. jìn wǔ dì, wg. Chin Wu-ti, personal name Sima Yan (司馬炎), courtesy name Anshi (安世) (236-May 17, 290) was a grandson of Sima Yi, a son of Sima Zhao, and the first emperor of the Jin Dynasty (265-420) after forcing the Cao Wei emperor Cao Huan to abdicate to him. He reigned from 265 to 290, and after destroying Eastern Wu in 280 was the emperor of the unified Chinese empire. Emperor Wu was known for his extravagance and sensuality, especially after the unification of China; legends boasted of his unimaginable potency over ten thousand concubines. Chinese personal names follow a number of conventions different from those of Western personal names. ... Sima (Simplified Chinese: 司马; Traditional Chinese: 司馬; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ssu-ma) is a Chinese family name. ... Chinese personal names follow a number of conventions different from those of Western personal names. ... Temple names (Traditional Chinese: 廟號 Simplified Chinese: 庙号 Pinyin: miào hào;), are commonly used when naming most Chinese, Vietnamese (such dynasties as Tran,Anterior Lê and Nguyen Dynasty) and most Korean rulers of the Goryeo and Joseon Dynasties. ... A posthumous name (Traditional Chinese: 諡號/謚號 Simplified Chinese: 谥号; Pinyin: shì hào; Romaji: shigō/tsuigō; Revised Romanization of Korean: siho) is a honorary name given to royalty in some cultures posthumously, that is, after the persons death. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiÇŽntǐzì; also called 简化字/簡化字, jiÇŽnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... PY, Py or py may stand for: Pinyin, a system of romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration to roman script) for Mandarin Chinese used in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Cha can also refer to a Latin American dance, also called the Cha-cha-cha. ... Events Pope Fabian succeeds Pope Anterus Births Deaths Pope Anterus Categories: 236 ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Events Jin Hui Di succeeds Jin Wu Di as emperor of China Births Pachomius, Christian monk (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 290 ... Sima Yi (179 - 251) was a general, military strategist, and politician of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ... Sima Zhao (司馬昭) (211-264) was the son of Prime Minister Sima Yi of the Kingdom of Wei, during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history. ... The Jin Dynasty (晉 pinyin jìn, 265-420) followed the Three Kingdoms and preceded the Southern and Northern Dynasties in China. ... Cao Wei (Simplified/Traditional Chinese: 曹魏; pinyin: Cáo Wèi), also known in English as the Kingdom of Wei (ch: 魏, py: wèi, wg: wei) (220-265) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... Cao Huan, ch. ... Events Wei Yuandi abdicates, end of the China. ... Events Jin Hui Di succeeds Jin Wu Di as emperor of China Births Pachomius, Christian monk (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 290 ... Eastern Wu (Chinese: 東吳, pinyin: dōng wú), also known as Sun Wu (Traditional Chinese: 孫吳, pinyin: sÅ«n wú) and (misleadingly) in English as the Kingdom of Wu, refers to a historical state in a region of China. ... Events The Chinese Jin Dynasty under Emperor Wu of Jin China unifies China by conquering the Kingdom of Wu, ending the Period of the Three Kingdoms. ... Concubinage is either the state of a couple living together as lovers with no obligation created by vows, legal marriage, or religious ceremony, or the state of a woman supported by a male lover who is married to, and usually living with, someone else. ...


Emperor Wu was commonly viewed as a generous and kind ruler, but was also wasteful. The generosity and kindness turned out to be down sides to his rule, as he became overly tolerant of the noble families' corruption and wastefulness, causing great drain on the people's resources. Further, when Emperor Wu established Jin Dynasty, he was concerned about his regime's stability, and, believing that the predecessor state Cao Wei was doomed by its failures to empower the princes of the imperial clan, he greatly empowered his uncles, his cousins, and his sons with authority and military commands, which ironically would lead to the great destabilization of the Jin Dynasty, as the princes engaged in an internectine struggle known as the War of the Eight Princes soon after his death, leading to the Wu Hu uprisings that nearly destroyed the Jin Dynasty and forced its relocation to the region south of the Huai River. This article appears to contradict itself. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Huai He The Huai River (Chinese: 淮河; pinyin: ) is about mid-way between the Yellow River (Huang He) and the Yangtze River. ...

Contents


Life before establishment of the Jin Dynasty

Sima Yan was born to Sima Zhao and his wife Wang Yuanji, daughter of the Confucian scholar Wang Su (王肅), in 236, as their oldest son. At that time, Sima Zhao was a mid-level official in the Cao Wei government and a member of a privileged clan, as the son of the renowned general Sima Yi. After Sima Yi seized power from the regent Cao Shuang in 249, Sima Zhao became more and more important. After his father's death in 251, Sima Zhao became the assistant to his brother, the new regent Sima Shi. After Sima Shi died in 255, Sima Zhao became regent and the paramount authority in the Cao Wei government. Sima Zhao (司馬昭) (211-264) was the son of Prime Minister Sima Yi of the Kingdom of Wei, during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history. ... Empress Dowager Wang Yuanji (王元姬) (217-268), formally Empress Wenming (文明皇后, literally, the civil and understanding empress) was an empress dowager during the Jin Dynasty (265-420). ... Confucianism (儒家 Pinyin: rújiā The School of the Scholars), sometimes translated as the School of Literati, is an East Asian ethical, religious and philosophical system originally developed from the teachings of Confucius. ... Events Pope Fabian succeeds Pope Anterus Births Deaths Pope Anterus Categories: 236 ... Cao Wei (Simplified/Traditional Chinese: 曹魏; pinyin: Cáo Wèi), also known in English as the Kingdom of Wei (ch: 魏, py: wèi, wg: wei) (220-265) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... Sima Yi (179 - 251) was a general, military strategist, and politician of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ... // High public office A regent, from the Latin regens who reigns is anyone who acts of head of state, especially if not the Monarch (who has higher titles). ... Cao Shuang (曹爽) is the son of Cao Zhen. ... Events Trajan Decius becomes Roman emperor. ... Events July 1 – In the Battle of Abrittus, the Goths defeat the Romans; emperors Decius and Herennius Etruscus are killed. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Events Births Deaths Wuqiu Jian, general of the Kingdom of Wei Categories: 255 ...


Sima Yan's first important appearance in history was in 260, when forces loyal to his father, led by Jia Chong, defeated an attempt by the Cao Wei emperor Cao Mao to take back power and killed Cao Mao. At that time, as a mid-level army general, he was commissioned by his father to escort the new emperor Cao Huan from his dukedom to the capital Luoyang. After his father was created the Duke of Jin in 263 in light of the army's conquest of Shu Han, he was named heir. However, at times Sima Zhao hesitated whether Sima Yan or his brother Sima You (司馬攸) would be the more appropriate heir -- as Sima You was considered talented and had also been adopted by Sima Shi, who had no biological sons of his own, and Sima Zhao, remembering his brother's role in the Simas' takeover of power, thought it might be appropriate to return power to his branch of the clan. However, a number of high level officials favored Sima Yan, and Sima Zhao agreed. After he was created the Prince of Jin in 264 (thus reaching the ultimate step before usurpation), Sima Yan was created the crown prince of Jin. Events Valerian I captured by the Persian king Shapur I; Gallienus becomes sole Roman emperor. ... Jia Chong (賈充) (217-282), courtesy name Gonghe (公闔), formally Duke Wu of Lu (魯武公), was an important official during the reign of Jin Dynasty (265-420)s founding emperor, Emperor Wu. ... Cao Mao, ch. ... Cao Huan, ch. ... Luoyang (Simplified Chinese: 洛阳; Traditional Chinese: 洛陽; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Events The Wei Kingdom conquered the kingdom of Shu Han, one of the Chinese Three Kingdoms. ... The Kingdom of Shu (蜀 shǔ) (221 – 263) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... Events Sun Hao succeeds Sun Xiu as ruler of the Chinese kingdom of Wu Births Deaths Deng Ai, Wei general Jiang Wei, Shu general,Grand Commander and strategist, and foster son of Zhuge Liang Zhang Yi, Shu general Zhong Hui, Wei general Categories: 264 ... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ...


In 265, Sima Zhao died without having actually taken imperial authority formally. Sima Yan became the Prince of Jin. Later that year, he forced Cao Huan to abdicate in favor of him, ending Cao Wei and starting Jin. Events Wei Yuandi abdicates, end of the China. ... Cao Huan, ch. ... Jin may refer to: Jin Dynasty (265-420) Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) (Jinn) Jin, a state in China during the Spring and Autumn Period Later Jin Dynasty, founded in 1616 by Nurhaci Jin, a ruler of the Xia dynasty The Jin state of late Bronze Age Korea Jin, a character...


Early reign: establishment of the Jin political system

Emperor Wu immediately sought to change what he saw as what doomed Cao Wei -- the lack of power that the imperial princes held. In 265, immediately after he took the throne, he created many of his uncles, cousins, brothers, and sons as imperial princes, each with independent military commands and full authority within their principalities. This system, while it would be scaled back after the War of the Eight Princes and the loss of northern China, would remain in place as a Jin institution for the duration of the dynasty's existence, and would be adopted by the succeeding Southern dynasties as well. Events Wei Yuandi abdicates, end of the China. ... The Southern dynasties 南朝 (nanchao in pinyin: nan2 chao2) include Song Dynasty, Qi Dynasty, Liang Dynasty and Chen Dynasty whose capital were all at Jiankang See also:Chinese history, Southern and Northern Dynasty, Chinese sovereign Categories: History of China ...


Another problem that Emperor Wu saw with Cao Wei's political system was its harshness in penal law, and he sought to reform the penal system to make it more merciful -- but the key beneficiaries of his changes turned out to be the nobles, as it quickly became clear that the mercy was being dealt out in an unequal manner. Nobles who committed crimes often received simple rebukes, while there were no meaningful reductions in penalties for ordinary defendants. This further led to massive corruption and extravagent living by the nobles, while the poor went without government assistance. For example, in 267, when several high level officials were found to have worked in conjunction with a county magistrate to seize public land for themselves, Emperor Wu refused to punish the high level officials while punishing the county magistrate harshly. Events Goths launch one of the first major barbarian invasions of the Roman Empire. ...


Militarily, Emperor Wu faced two major issues almost immediately -- incessant harassment from the rival Eastern Wu's forces, under emperor Sun Hao, and Xianbei and Qiang rebellions in Qin (秦州) and Liang (涼州) Provinces (modern Gansu). Most officials were more concerned about the Xianbei and Qiang rebellions and also with another non-Han people -- the Xiongnu, who had settled down in modern Shanxi after the dissolution of their state by Cao Cao in 216 under the watchful eyes of Chinese officials but were constantly feared for their military abilities, and these officials advised Emperor Wu to try to suppress the Xianbei and the Qiang before considering conquests of Eastern Wu. Under the encouragement of the generals Yang Hu (羊祜) and Wang Jun (王濬) and the strategist Zhang Hua (張華), however, Emperor Wu, while sending a number of generals to combat the Xianbei and the Qiang, prepared the southern and eastern border regions for war against the Eastern Wu throughout this part of his reign. He was particularly encouraged by reports of Sun Hao's cruelty and ineptitude in governing Eastern Wu; indeed, the officials in favor of war against Eastern Wu often cited this as reason to act quickly, as they argued that Eastern Wu would be harder to conquer if and when Sun Hao was replaced. However, after a major revolt by the Xianbei chief Tufa Shujineng (禿髮樹機能) started in 270 in Qin Province, Emperor Wu's attention became concentrated on Tufa, as Tufa was able to win victory after victory over Jin generals. Further, in 271, the Xiongnu noble Liu Meng (劉猛) rebelled as well, and while his rebellion did not last long, this further led Emperor Wu's attention away from attacking Eastern Wu. In 271, indeed, Jiao Province (交州, modern northern Vietnam), which had paid allegiance to Jin ever since the start of his reign, was recaptured by Eastern Wu. In 272, the Eastern Wu general Bu Chan (步闡), in fear that Sun Hao was going to punish him based on false report of his crimes, tried to surrender the important city of Xiling (西陵, in modern Yichang, Hubei) to Jin, but Jin relief forces were stopped by the Eastern Wu general Lu Kang, who then recaptured Xiling and killed Bu. In light of these failures, Yang took another tact -- he started a detente with Lu and treated the Eastern Wu border residents well, causing them to become impressed with Jin. Eastern Wu (Chinese: 東吳, pinyin: dōng wú), also known as Sun Wu (Traditional Chinese: 孫吳, pinyin: sÅ«n wú) and (misleadingly) in English as the Kingdom of Wu, refers to a historical state in a region of China. ... Sun Hao (å­«çš“) (242-284), courtesy name Yuanzong (元宗), originally named Sun Pengzu (孫彭祖) with the courtesy name Haozong (çš“å®—), was the fourth and final emperor of Eastern Wu during the Three Kingdoms period. ... The Xianbei (鮮卑, written XiānbÄ“i in pinyin or Hsien-pei in Wade-Giles) were a significant nomadic people residing in modern Manchuria and eastern Mongolia before migrating into areas of the modern Chinese provinces of Shanxi, Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Hebei, Inner Mongolia, and Liaoning. ... The Qiang people (羌族; Pinyin: qiāng zú) are an ethnic group. ... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, or modified as Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A Xiongnu belt buckle. ... Shanxi (Chinese: 山西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shansi) is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Cao Cao (155 – 220), whose name is also often transliterated and should be correctly pronounced as Tsao Tsao, was a regional warlord and the last Chancellor of Eastern Han Dynasty who rose to great power during the last years of the Eastern Han Dynasty in ancient China. ... Events The Baths of Caracalla in Britain is divided into Britannia Superior and Britannia Inferior. ... Yang Hu (羊祜) (221-278), courtesy name Shuzi (叔子), was a Jin Dynasty (265-420) general whose great advocacy for plans to conquer the Eastern Wu finally persuaded Emperor Wu to carry them out, but he would not live to see the plans implemented. ... Zhang Hua (張華) (232-300), courtesy name Maoxian (茂先), was a Jin Dynasty (265-420) official and poet. ... Events Quintillus briefly holds power over the Roman Empire, and is succeeded by Aurelian Vandals and Sarmatians driven out of Roman territory Romans leave Utrecht after regular invasions of Germanic people. ... Events Goths forced to withdraw across the Danube Roman Emperor Aurelian withdraws troops to the Danube frontier, abandoning Dacia. ... Events Roman emperor Aurelian reconquers the kingdom of Palmyra (Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor), forcing queen Zenobia to flee to Parthia. ... Yichang (宜昌) is a city in the Hubei province of China. ... Hubei (Chinese: 湖北; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hu-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hupeh) is a central province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Lu Kang (陸抗; 226 – 274) was a son of Lu Xun and the grandson of Sun Ce. ... For the Spanish amulet, see: Detente bala. ...


When Emperor Wu ascended the throne in 265, he honored his mother Wang Yuanji as empress dowager. In 266, he also honored his aunt Yang Huiyu (Sima Shi's wife) an empress dowager, in recognition of his uncle's contributions to the establishment of Jin Dynasty. He created his wife Yang Yan empress the same year. In 267, he created her oldest surviving son, Sima Zhong crown prince -- based on the Confucian principle that the oldest son by an emperor's wife should inherit the throne -- a selection that would, however, eventually contribute greatly to political instability and Jin Dynasty's decline, as Crown Prince Zhong appeared to be developmentally disabled and unable to learn the important skills necessary to govern. Emperor Wu further made perhaps a particular fatal choice on Crown Prince Zhong's behalf -- in 272, he selected Jia Nanfeng, the strong-willed daughter of the noble Jia Chong, to be Crown Prince Zhong's princess. Crown Princess Jia would, from that point on, have the crown prince under her tight control. Before Empress Yang died in 274, she was concerned that whoever the new empress would be would have ambitions to replace the crown prince, and therefore asked Emperor Wu to marry her cousin Yang Zhi. He agreed. Empress Dowager (Chinese, Korean and Japanese: 皇太后; Chinese pinyin Húang Tài Hòu, Korean pronunciation: Hwang Tae Hu, Japanese pronunciation: Kōtaigō) was title given to the mother of a Chinese emperor. ... Events Ireland - Rule of High King Cormac mac Airt ends (approximate) Births Deaths Categories: 266 ... Empress Dowager Yang Huiyu (羊徽瑜) (214-278), formally Empress Jingxian (景獻皇后, literally the decisive and wise empress), semi-formally Empress Dowager Hongxun (弘訓太后) was an empress dowager during the Jin Dynasty (265-420). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Empress Yang Yan (楊艷) (238-274), courtesy name Qiongzhi (瓊芝), formally Empress Wuyuan (武元皇后, formally the martial and discerning empress) was an empress of Jin Dynasty (265-420). ... Emperor Hui of Jin, sim. ... Developmental Disability (also called mental handicap and, as defined by the UK Mental Health Act 1983), mental impairment and severe mental impairment) is a term for a pattern of persistently slow learning of basic motor and language skills (milestones) during childhood, and a significantly below-normal global intellectual capacity as... Events Roman emperor Aurelian reconquers the kingdom of Palmyra (Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor), forcing queen Zenobia to flee to Parthia. ... Empress Jia Nanfeng (賈南風) of the Jin Dynasty was the daughter of Jia Chong - Son of Jia Xu. ... Jia Chong (賈充) (217-282), courtesy name Gonghe (公闔), formally Duke Wu of Lu (魯武公), was an important official during the reign of Jin Dynasty (265-420)s founding emperor, Emperor Wu. ... Events The Gallic Empire (Gaul and Britain) is reconquered by Roman Emperor Aurelian With the conquests of the Palmyran Empire (272) and the Gallic Empire, the Roman Empire is united again Births Deaths Pope Felix I Cao Fang, emperor of the Kingdom of Wei Categories: 274 ... Empress Yang Zhi (楊芷) (259-292), courtesy name Jilan (季蘭), nickname Nanyin (男胤), formally Empress Wudao (武悼皇后, literally the martial and fearful empress) was an empress of Jin Dynasty (265-420). ...


In 273, Emperor Wu would undertake a selection of beautiful women throughtout the empire -- a warning sign of what would eventually come. While he concentrated on the daughters of officials, the selection process apparently was broader, for he also ordered that no marriages take place until the selection process was done. Events Under the command of Emperor Aurelian, the Roman Army sacks the city of Palmyra. ...


Middle reign: unification of the Chinese empire

In 276, Emperor Wu suffered a major illness -- which led to a succession crisis. While Crown Prince Zhong would be the legitimate heir, but both the officials and the people hoped that Emperor Wu's capable brother, Sima You the Prince of Qi, would inherit the throne instead. After Emperor Wu became well, he divested some military commands from officials that he thought wanted Prince You to be emperor, but otherwise took no other punitive actions against anyone. Events Sassanid Shah Bahram II succeeded Bahram I. Probus became Roman Emperor. ...


Later that year, Yang Hu again brought to Emperor Wu's attention his plan to conquer Eastern Wu. Most of the officials were opposed, still concerned with Tufa's rebellion, but Yang was supported by Du Yu (杜預) and Zhang. Emperor Wu considered their suggestions seriously but did not implement it at this time.


Also in 276, pursuant to his promise to the deceased Empress Yang, Emperor Wu married her cousin Yang Zhi and created her empress. The new Empress Yang's father, Yang Jun, became a key official in the administration and became exceeding arrogant.


In 279, with the general Ma Long (馬隆) having finally put down Tufa's rebellion, Emepror Wu concentrated his efforts on Eastern, and commissioned a six-pronged attack led by his uncle Sima Zhou (司馬伷), Wang Hun (王渾), Wang Rong (王戎), Hu Fen (胡奮), Du, and Wang Jun, with the largest forces under Wang Hun and Wang Jun's commands. Each of the Jin forces advanced quickly and captured the border cities that they were targeting, with Wang Jun's fleet heading east down the Yangtze and clearing the river of Eastern Wu fleets. The Eastern Wu prime minister Zhang Ti (張悌) made a last ditch attempt to defeat Wang Hun's force, but was defeated and killed. Wang Hun, Wang Jun, and Sima Zhou each headed for Jianye, and Sun Hao was forced to surrender in spring 280. Emperor Wu created Sun Hao the Marquess of Guiming. The integration of former Eastern Wu territory into Jin appeared to be a relatively smooth process. Events Births Deaths Categories: 279 ... Events The Chinese Jin Dynasty under Emperor Wu of Jin China unifies China by conquering the Kingdom of Wu, ending the Period of the Three Kingdoms. ...


After the fall of Eastern Wu, Emperor Wu ordered that provincial governors be no longer in charge of military matters and become purely civilian governors, and that regional militias be disbanded, despite opposition by the general Tao Huang (陶璜) and the key official Shan Tao (山濤). This would also eventually prove to create problems later on during the Wu Hu rebellions, as the regional governors were not able to raise troops to resist quickly enough. He also refused suggestions to have the non-Han gradually moved outside of the empire proper.


Late reign: setting the stage for disasters

In 281, Emperor Wu took 5,000 women from Sun Hao's palace into his own, and thereafter became even more concentrated on feasting and enjoying the women, rather than on important matters of state. It was said that there were so many beautiful women in the palace that he did not know whom he should have sexual relations with; he therefore rode on a small cart drawn by goats, and wherever the goats would stop, he would stop there, as well. Because of this, many of the women planted bamboo leaves and salt outside their bedrooms -- both items said to be favored by goats. In light of his disinterest in important matters, Empress Yang's father Yang Jun and uncles Yang Yao (楊珧) and Yang Ji (楊濟) became effectively in power. Events Births Deaths Categories: 281 ...


Emperor Wu also became more concerned about whether his brother Prince You would seize the throne if he died. In 282, he sent Prince You to his principality, even though there was no evidence that Prince You had such ambitions. Prince You, in anger, grew ill and died in 283. Events Carus becomes Roman emperor A new city was constructed in Fuzhou slightly south of the original city Ye. ... Events December 17 - Pope Gaius succeeds Pope Eutychian December - Numerian was proclaimed Roman emperor by his soldiers. ...


As Emperor Wu grew ill in 289, he considered whom to make regent. He considered both Yang Jun and his uncle Sima Liang the Prince of Ru'nan, the most respected of the imperial princes. As a result, Yang Jun became fearful of Sima Liang and had him posted to the key city of Xuchang (許昌, in modern Xuchang, Henan). Several other imperial princes were also posted to other key cities in the empire. By 290, Emperor Wu resolved to let Yang and Sima Liang both be regents, but after he wrote his will, the will was seized by Yang Jun, who instead had another will promulgated in which Yang alone was named regent. Emperor Wu died soon thereafter, leaving the empire in the hands of a developmentally disabled son and nobles intent on shedding each other's blood for power, and while he would not see the disasterous consequences himself, the consequences would soon come. Events Constantius Chlorus married Flavia Maximiana Theodora, stepdaughter of Maximian after renouncing Helena, his wife and mother of Constantine the Great. ... Xuchang (Simplified Chinese: 许昌; Traditional Chinese: 許昌; pinyin: Xǔchāng), with a population of over 4 million people, is a city in Henan Province, China. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ... Events Jin Hui Di succeeds Jin Wu Di as emperor of China Births Pachomius, Christian monk (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 290 ...


Era names

Events Wei Yuandi abdicates, end of the China. ... Events The Gallic Empire (Gaul and Britain) is reconquered by Roman Emperor Aurelian With the conquests of the Palmyran Empire (272) and the Gallic Empire, the Roman Empire is united again Births Deaths Pope Felix I Cao Fang, emperor of the Kingdom of Wei Categories: 274 ... Events Eutychian elected pope (probable date) September 25 - Marcus Claudius Tacitus appointed emperor by the senate Births Eusebius of Caesarea (approximate date) Saint George, soldier of the Roman Empire and later Christian martyr (or 280, approximate date). ... Events The Chinese Jin Dynasty under Emperor Wu of Jin China unifies China by conquering the Kingdom of Wu, ending the Period of the Three Kingdoms. ... Events The Chinese Jin Dynasty under Emperor Wu of Jin China unifies China by conquering the Kingdom of Wu, ending the Period of the Three Kingdoms. ... Events Constantius Chlorus married Flavia Maximiana Theodora, stepdaughter of Maximian after renouncing Helena, his wife and mother of Constantine the Great. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Jin Hui Di succeeds Jin Wu Di as emperor of China Births Pachomius, Christian monk (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 290 ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Events Jin Hui Di succeeds Jin Wu Di as emperor of China Births Pachomius, Christian monk (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 290 ...

Personal information

  • Father
    • Sima Zhao, Prince Wen of Jin, posthumously honored as Emperor Wen of Jin
  • Mother
  • Wives
    • Empress Yang Yan (created 266, d. 274), mother of Prince Gui, Emperor Hui, and Prince Jian, and Princesses Pingyang, Xinfeng, and Yangping
    • Empress Yang Zhi (created 276, d. 290), cousin of Empress Yang Yan, mother of Prince Hui
  • Major Concubines
    • Consort Zuo Fen (左芬)
    • Consort Hu (胡芳), daughter of Hu Fen (胡奮)
    • Consort Zhuge Wan (諸葛婉)
    • Consort Shen, mother of Princes Jing, Wei and Ai
    • Consort Xu, mother of Prince Xian
    • Consort Gui, mother of Prince Zhi
    • Consort Zhao, mother of Prince Yu
    • Consort Zhao, mother of Prince Yǎn
    • Consort Li, mother of Princes Yun and Yàn
    • Consort Yan, mother of Prince Gai
    • Consort Chen, mother of Prince Xia
    • Consort Zhu, mother of Prince Mo
    • Consort Cheng, mother of Prince Ying
    • Consort Wang, mother of Emperor Huai
  • Children
    • Sima Gui (司馬軌), died early, posthumously created Prince Dao of Piling (289)
    • Sima Zhong (司馬衷), the Crown Prince (created 267), later Emperor Hui of Jin
    • Sima Jian (司馬柬) (b. 262), initially the Prince of Ru'nan (created 270), later the Prince of Nanyang (created c. 276), later Prince Xian of Qin (created 289, d. 291)
    • Sima Jing (司馬景), Prince Huai of Chengyang (created 269, d. 270)
    • Sima Wei (司馬瑋) (b. 271), initially created the Prince of Shiping, later Prince Yin of Chu (created c. 289, executed by Empress Jia Nanfeng 291)
    • Sima Xian (司馬憲), Prince Shang of Chengyang (created 270?, d. 273?)
    • Sima Zhi (司馬祉) (b. 271), Prince Chong of Donghai (created and d. 273)
    • Sima Yu (司馬裕) (b. 271), Prince Ai of Shiping (created and d. 277)
    • Sima Yǎn (司馬演) (note different tone than his father and brother), Prince Ai of Dai (created 289)
    • Sima Yun (司馬允) (b. 272), initially Prince of Puyang (created 277), later Prince Zhongzhuang of Huainan (created 289, killed by Sima Lun 300)
    • Sima Gai (司馬該) (b. 272), Prince Huai of Xindu (created 277, d. 283)
    • Sima Xia (司馬遐) (b. 273), Prince Kang of Qinghe (created 289, d. 300)
    • Sima Mo (司馬謨) (b. 276), Prince Ai of Ruyin (d. 286)
    • Sima Ai (司馬乂) (b. 277), Prince Li of Changsha (created 289, demoted to Prince of Changshan 291, restored 301, killed by Sima Yong 304)
    • Sima Ying (司馬穎) (b. 279, initially the Prince of Chengdu (created c. 289), later the Crown Prince (created 304), later demoted back to Prince of Chengdu (304, forced to commit suicide 306)
    • Sima Yàn (司馬晏) (b. 283) (note different tone than his father and brother), Prince Xiao of Wu (initially created 289, demoted to Prince of Bingtu 300, later created Prince of Dai, restored to Prince of Wu in 301, killed by Han Zhao forces 313)
    • Sima Chi (司馬熾), initially the Prince of Yuzhang (created 290), later the Crown Prince (created 304), later Emperor Huai of Jin
    • Sima Hui (司馬恢) (b. 283, d. 284), posthumously created Prince Shang of Bohai
    • Eight other sons who died early without being created princes
    • Princess Changshan
    • Princess Changguang
    • Princess Pingyang
    • Princess Xinfeng
    • Princess Yangping
    • Princess Wannian
Preceded by:
None (dynasty founded)
Emperor of Jin Dynasty (265-420)
265290
Succeeded by:
Emperor Hui of Jin
Preceded by:
Cao Huan of Cao Wei
Emperor of China (Northern/Central/Southwestern)
265290
Preceded by:
Sun Hao of Eastern Wu
Emperor of China (Southeastern)
280290

  Results from FactBites:
 
Emperor Wu of Jin China - definition of Emperor Wu of Jin China in Encyclopedia (122 words)
Emperor Wu of Jin China - definition of Emperor Wu of Jin China in Encyclopedia
Chin Wu-ti (between 234 and 236-May 17,290) was a grandson of Sima Yi and the first emperor of the Jin Dynasty (265-420).
Emperor Wu was known for his extravagence and sensuality, espcially after the unification of China after 280; legends boasted of his unimaginable potency over ten thousand concubines.
China and Korea, 300 to 500 CE (3389 words)
The Jin emperor was carried off and forced to become a cupbearer, until Liu Cong had him executed.
The newly declared Jin emperor was made to serve Liu Ts'ung as had his predecessor, by rinsing cups during feasts, until he too was executed.
In the south, meanwhile, Liu Yu was able to force the Jin emperor to abdicate in his favor, and Liu Yu began what was to be known as the Liu Song dynasty.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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