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Encyclopedia > Emperor Suzaku

Emperor Suzaku (朱雀天皇 Suzaku-tennō) (923-952) was the 61st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. He ruled from 930 to 946.[1] Events June 15 - Battle of Soissons: King Robert I of France is killed, King Charles the Simple is arrested by the supporters of Duke Rudolph of Burgundy. ... Events Hugh Capet marries Adelaide of Aquitaine Deaths Emperor Suzaku of Japan Hugh, Duke of Burgundy Categories: 952 ... For the CPR ocean liner, see Empress of Japan. ... Events With the establishment of the Icelandic Althing, now the worlds oldest parliament, the Icelandic Commonwealth is founded. ... Events Eadred I succeeds his brother as king of England End of the reign of Emperor Suzaku of Japan Emperor Murakami ascends the throne of Japan Births Deaths May 26 - King Edmund I of England Abu-Bakr Muhammad ben Yahya as-Suli Categories: 946 ...

Contents

Genealogy

Before his ascension of the Chrysanthemum Throne, his personal name (his imina)[2] was Hiroakira-shinnō.[3] He was also known as Yutaakira-shinnō.[4] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Imperial Seal of Japan. ...


Hiroakira-shinnō was the 11th son of Emperor Daigo and Empress Consort Onshi, a daughter of the regent and great minister of the council of state, Fujiwara no Mototsune.[5] Emperor Daigo (醍醐天皇 Daigo Tennō) (January 18, 885– October 23, 930) was the 60th Imperial Ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Fujiwara no Mototsune (藤原基経, 836-891) continued the trend begun by Yoshifusa of monopolising the position of regent to the Japanese emperor. ...


Events of Suzaku's life

Suzaku's older brother died unexpectedly young, as did his brother's son. These untimely deaths opened the way for Suzaku to acede to the throne.

  • Enchō 8, on the 22nd day of the 9th month (930): In the 33rd year of the reign of Daigo-tennō (醍醐天皇33年), the emperor died; and the succession (the senso) was received by his eleventh son, Hiroakira-shinnō[6] (also known as Yutaakira-shinnō).[7]
  • Enchō 8, in the 11th month (930): Emperor Suzaku, who was only 8 years old, acceded to the throne (the sokui).[8]
  • Enchō 9, on the 26th day of the 4th month (931): The era name was changed to mark the beginning of the new emperor's reign.[9]
  • Jōhei 1, on the 19th day of the 7th month (931): The former-Emperor Uda (867-931) died at the age of 65.[10]
  • Jōhei 2, in the 8th month (932): The udaijin (Minister of the Right) Fujiwara no Sadakata (873-932) died at the age of 65.[11]
  • Jōhei 3, in the 8th month (933): The dainagon (Counselor) Fujiwara no Nakahira, brother of sesshō (Regent) Fujiwara Takahira, is named udaijin.[12]
  • Jōhei 3, in the 12th month (933): Ten of the chief dignitaries of the empire went falcon-hunting together in Owari province. Each of them was magnificent in his formal hunting attire.[13]
  • Jōhei 5 (935): The Great Fundamental Central Hall (kompon chūdō) on Mt. Hiei burned down.[14]
  • Jōhei 6, on the 19th day of the 8th month (936): Fujiwara Tadahira was named daijō-daijin (Prime Minister); and in this same period, Fujiwara Nakahira was named sadaijin (Minister of the Left), and Fujiwara Tsunesuke was named udaijin.[15]
  • Jōhei 7, in the 12th month (937): The former-Emperor Yōzei celebrated his 70th birthday.[16]
  • Jōhei 8, in the 4th month (937): Serial intermittent ground-tremors were felt in Heian-kyo from the 10th through the 29th days of this month.[17]

During his reign Taira no Masakado staged a rebellion in the Kantō region and denominated himself the new emperor, but the rebellion was eventually put down. Enchō (Japanese: 延長) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... Events With the establishment of the Icelandic Althing, now the worlds oldest parliament, the Icelandic Commonwealth is founded. ... Events With the establishment of the Icelandic Althing, now the worlds oldest parliament, the Icelandic Commonwealth is founded. ... Events Ramiro II of Leon becomes king of León Eric Bloodaxe becomes second king of Norway Births Deaths Emperor Uda of Japan Harald I of Norway Categories: 931 ... Events Ramiro II of Leon becomes king of León Eric Bloodaxe becomes second king of Norway Births Deaths Emperor Uda of Japan Harald I of Norway Categories: 931 ... Emperor Uda (宇多天皇 Uda Tennō) (May 5, 867- July 19, 931) was the 59th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Events Foundation of the St. ... Udaijin (右大臣), most commonly translated as Minister of the Right, was a government position in Japan in the late Nara and Heian periods. ... Fujiwara no Sadakata 873-932), also known as Sanjo Udaijin (三条右大臣), was a Japanese poet. ... Events Jersey was seized by William Longsword, Duke of Normandy . ... Dainagon ), often translated as Great Councillor, was a government post of the Japanese ritsuryo governmental system, which was in place for much of the classical and feudal periods. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Japanese Imperial Advisers. ... Events Jersey was seized by William Longsword, Duke of Normandy . ... Events Václav (Saint Wenceslas), Duke of the Bohemians, murdered by his brother, Boleslav I, who succeeds him Gyeonhwon, the king of Hubaekje, is overthrown by his eldest son Singeom. ... Mount Hiei (Jp. ... Events King Taejo of Goryeo (Wanggeon) defeats Hubaekje. ... Fujiwara no Tadahira (藤原 å¿ å¹³; 880 - 949) was a kuge (Japanese noble) who served as regent under Emperor Suzaku who ruled from 930 to 946. ... Events Athelstan wins the Battle of Brunanburh September 21 - Magdeburg is now the capital of the Holy Roman Empire, after a Diet held by Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor Births Duke William IV of Aquitaine (d. ... Emperor Yōzei (from the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu) Emperor Yōzei (陽成天皇 Yōzei-tennō) (869-949) was the 57th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Events Athelstan wins the Battle of Brunanburh September 21 - Magdeburg is now the capital of the Holy Roman Empire, after a Diet held by Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor Births Duke William IV of Aquitaine (d. ... Location of Kyoto, on the main island of Japan Kyoto (Japanese: 京都市; Kyōto-shi) is a city in Japan that has a population of 1. ... Taira no Masakados tomb(Burial only his head). ... Kantō region, Japan. ...


Suzaku reigned for 16 years, and died at the age of 30.[18] He was succeeded by his younger brother, Emperor Murakami. Emperor Murakami (村上天皇 Murakami Tennō) (June 2, 926 – May 25, 967) was the 62nd imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ...


Kugyō

Kugyō (公卿) is a collective term for the very few most powerful men attached to the court of the Emperor of Japan in pre-Meiji eras.-- kugyō of Suzaku-tennō (in French) For the CPR ocean liner, see Empress of Japan. ... Meiji (明 bright, brilliant æ²» reign, government) may refer to: Meiji Restoration, the revolution that ushered in the Meiji Era Meiji period - the period in Japanese history when the Meiji Emperor reigned Emperor Meiji of Japan - Mutsuhito, the Meiji Emperor, who reigned during Meiji Era Meiji Constitution - ie. ...


In general, this elite group included only three to four men at a time. These were hereditary courtiers whose experience and background have brought them to the pinnacle of a life's career. During Suzaku's reign, this apex of the Daijō-kan included: The Daijō-kan ) was the Department of State in Nara and Heian period Japan and briefly under the Meiji Constitution. ...

  • Sesshō, Fujiwara no Tadahira (藤原忠平), 880-949.[19]
  • Kampaku, Fujiwara no Tadahira (藤原忠平).[20]
  • Daijō-daijin, Fujiwara no Tadahira (藤原忠平).[21]
  • Sadaijin, Fujiwara no Tadahira (藤原忠平).
  • Sadaijin, Fujiwara no Nakahira (藤原仲平).
  • Udaijin, Fujiwara no Sadakata (藤原定方).
  • Udaijin, Fujiwara no Nakahira (藤原仲平).
  • Udaijin, Fujiwara no Tsunesuke (藤原恒佐).
  • Udaijin, Fujiwara no Saneyori (藤原実頼), 900-970.[22]
  • Nadaijin
  • Dainagon

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Japanese Imperial Advisers. ... Fujiwara no Tadahira (藤原 忠平; 880 - 949) was a kuge (Japanese nobel) who served as regent under Emperor Suzaku who ruled from 930 to 946. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The Daijō daijin ) or Chancellor of the Realm was the head of the Daijō-kan, or Department of State in Heian Japan and briefly under the Meiji Constitution. ... Sadaijin (左大臣), most commonly translated as Minister of the Left, was a government position in Japan in the late Nara and Heian periods. ... Udaijin (右大臣), most commonly translated as Minister of the Right, was a government position in Japan in the late Nara and Heian periods. ... Naidaijin (内大臣), usually translated as Inner Minister -- also known as the Minister of the Center (中大臣) -- was a Japanese government post. ... Dainagon ), often translated as Great Councillor, was a government post of the Japanese ritsuryo governmental system, which was in place for much of the classical and feudal periods. ...

Eras of Suzaku's reign

The years of Suzaku's reign are more specifically identified by more than one era name or nengō.[23] Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... The Japanese era calendar scheme is a common calendar scheme used in Japan, which identifies a year by the combination of the Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ...

  • Enchō (923-931)
  • Jōhei (931-938)
  • Tengyō (938-947)

Enchō (Japanese: 延長) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... Jōhei (Japanese: 承平, also romanized as Shōhei) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... Tengyō (天慶) is the name of a Japanese era equivalent to the years 938-947 on the Western calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, pp. 134-139; Brown, Delmer. (1879). Gukanshō, pp. 294-295; Varley, H. Paul (1980) Jinnō Shōtōki, pp. 181-183.
  2. ^ Brown, p. 264. [Up until the time of Emperor Jomei, the personal names of the emperors (their imina) were very long and people did not generally use them. The number of characters in each name diminished after Jomei's reign.]
  3. ^ Titsingh, p. 134; Varley, p. 181.
  4. ^ Brown, p. 294.
  5. ^ Varley, p. 181.
  6. ^ Titsingh, p. 134; Varley, p. 181.
  7. ^ Brown, p. 295, Varley, p. 44. [A distinct act of senso is unrecognized prior to Emperor Tenji; and all sovereigns except Jitō, Yōzei, Go-Toba, and Fushimi have senso and sokui in the same year until the reign of Go-Murakami.]
  8. ^ Titsingh, p. 134; Varley, p. 44.
  9. ^ Brown, p. 295; Varley, p. 181-182.
  10. ^ Titsingh, p. 135; Brown, p. 295.
  11. ^ Titsingh, p. 135.
  12. ^ Titsingh, p. 135; Brown, p. 294.
  13. ^ Titsingh, p. 135.
  14. ^ Brown, p. 295.
  15. ^ Titsingh, p. 135.
  16. ^ Titsingh, p. 135.
  17. ^ Titsingh, p. 136.
  18. ^ Varley, p. 183.
  19. ^ Brown, p. 294.
  20. ^ Brown, p. 294.
  21. ^ Brown, p. 294.
  22. ^ Brown, p. 295.
  23. ^ Titsingh, p. 134.
  • Brown, Delmer M. and Ichirō Ishida, eds. (1979). [ Jien, 1221], Gukanshō (The Future and the Past, a translation and study of the Gukanshō, an interpretative history of Japan written in 1219). Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-03460-0
  • Titsingh, Isaac, ed. (1834). [Siyun-sai Rin-siyo/Hayashi Gahō, 1652], Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon, tr. par M. Isaac Titsingh avec l'aide de plusieurs interprètes attachés au comptoir hollandais de Nangasaki; ouvrage re., complété et cor. sur l'original japonais-chinois, accompagné de notes et précédé d'un Aperçu d'histoire mythologique du Japon, par M. J. Klaproth. Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland.--Two copies of this rare book have now been made available online: (1) from the library of the University of Michigan, digitized January 30, 2007; and (2) from the library of Stanford University, digitized June 23, 2006. Click here to read the original text in French.
  • Varley, H. Paul , ed. (1980). [ Kitabatake Chikafusa, 1359], Jinnō Shōtōki ("A Chronicle of Gods and Sovereigns: Jinnō Shōtōki of Kitabatake Chikafusa" translated by H. Paul Varley). New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-04940-4
Preceded by
Emperor Daigo
Emperor of Japan:
Suzaku

930-946
Succeeded by
Emperor Murakami

  Results from FactBites:
 
Emperor Suzaku - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (104 words)
Emperor Suzaku (朱雀天皇 Suzaku Tennō) (923-952) was the 61st imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
He was a son of Emperor Daigo and Empress Consort Onshi, a daughter of Fujiwara no Mototsune.
During his reign Taira no Masakado staged a rebellion in the Kantō region and denominated himself the new emperor, but the rebellion was eventually put down.
Tale of Genji (2514 words)
For this reason the Emperor normally had a range of recognized relationships with women, less because of sexual acquisitiveness on his part than because he was required to make his prestige relatively widely accessible to the members of the upper aristocracy.
Genji, the hero of the tale, is an Emperor's son by an Intimate who has lost her father and so has no support of any kind beyond the Emperor's personal devotion to her.
The Emperor longs to appoint Genji Heir Apparent over his firstborn, who is the son of a Consort, but he knows that the court would never stand for it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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